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  #871  
Old March 3rd, 2005, 5:07 pm
FoxyDoxy  Female.gif FoxyDoxy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alci
I guess full gowns was not in your unifrom code...


Ha! non existent skirts and 'bling' seemed to be the uniform (and whatever victoria Beckam or some other Chav goddess was wearing) Actually probably not fair of me to speak ill of them, I doubt my spiky purple hair'd fit in at your school anymore than their hoodies and chains.
Pupil appearances aside it's a shame that all schools do not value manners and good behavior as much as public schools. Stricter boundaries seem to make it easier to learn. Lessons where chairs are thrown ect really drag everyone down and make it impossible to concentrate.

Quote:
Labour keeps telling us that all schools are just as good as each other - so clearly both our former schools must be the same...government ministers don't lie


Bloody blair. "Education, education, education" My foot!


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Last edited by FoxyDoxy : March 3rd, 2005 at 5:11 pm.
  #872  
Old March 3rd, 2005, 5:13 pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FoxyDoxy
Bloody blair. "Education, education, education" My foot!


You don't think El Presidente's policy to give out A*s to everyone, even if they can't read or write, is working then


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  #873  
Old March 3rd, 2005, 5:47 pm
FoxyDoxy  Female.gif FoxyDoxy is offline
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Perzident blairs is top geezer! Me wuden't be minista for 'elf if it weren't for 'im.

we're doomed!


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  #874  
Old March 4th, 2005, 7:48 am
Goldberry  Female.gif Goldberry is offline
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Which is correct: all of THE sudden or all of A sudden? All of *insert correct form here* sudden I can't remember!


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  #875  
Old March 4th, 2005, 8:45 am
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Mundungus Fletc  Male.gif Mundungus Fletc is offline
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I would say all of a sudden (I think)


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  #876  
Old March 4th, 2005, 11:54 am
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Agreed


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  #877  
Old March 4th, 2005, 12:31 pm
icklek  Female.gif icklek is offline
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I have a question about two phrases I hear a lot on American TV (I'm from the UK). Both sound horribly wrong to me but seem to be very common over there, so I was just wondering if they're correct to use.

The first is "bunch of" - e.g. "I know a bunch of people that like that movie".

The second is "would have" - e.g. "The concert sounded great, I wish I would have gone to it".

To me, the word bunch should only be used when talking about grapes or flowers etc - something that is actually bunched together. As for my second example, should it not be "I wish I had gone to it"?

To the person who asked about how to handle cutlery - when cutting food I hold the fork in my left hand and my knife in my right, but then I put my knife down and change my fork to my right hand to actually eat. If I'm eating something that doesn't require a knife at all the fork/spoon is always in my right hand.

One last thing, why do Americans constantly use the word "real" when they should be using "really"? As in "he's real smart" - it really bugs me!!!


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Last edited by icklek : March 4th, 2005 at 12:37 pm.
  #878  
Old March 4th, 2005, 12:57 pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by icklek
so I was just wondering if they're correct to use.The first is "bunch of" - e.g. "I know a bunch of people that like that movie".


In informal American English this is acceptable. However in formal writing or in all forms of British English; group, not bunch, would be used.

Quote:
The second is "would have" - e.g. "The concert sounded great, I wish I would have gone to it".


It's somewhat convoluted as a construction so I'd obviously prefer "I had". [/QUOTE]


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Thus choosing to die resisting, rather than to live submitting, they fled only from dishonour, but met danger face to face, and after one brief moment, while at the summit of their fortune, escaped, not from their fear, but from their glory.

Thucydides: The Peloponnesian War
  #879  
Old March 4th, 2005, 4:36 pm
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This is my las post, goodbye. I have never been able to get an avatar anyway


  #880  
Old March 4th, 2005, 8:22 pm
Goldberry  Female.gif Goldberry is offline
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Ah, thanks, guys! About "real": I think fewer people are using that now, thankfully. I usually hear people over 30 saying it, and personally it reminds me of Leave it to Beaver when I think about it (such as in "gee, that's real neat!" or something), but maybe that's just around here.


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  #881  
Old March 5th, 2005, 5:20 am
Dreamless  Female.gif Dreamless is offline
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I'd like to point out, that English is one of the hardest languages to learn. So please, if you write in English and it isn't your native tongue, don't feel bad, we all must learn things and I find forgein languages hard to learn, I know a few Japanese words but not a lot.

Man, I was homeschooled since first grade, I think I'd be terribly put out in a Brit shcool. Really, black marks?

EDIT: I was just reading Chapter Three 'THe Knight Bus' in POA. I was wondering if it is common (or not so common) for someone to drop their 'H's when they talk, like Stan?

Also, I've been taught to not start off a sentance with the word 'and' (though sometimes I do) is that common in British writting?

Example: And without even removing his glass, he slumped back onto his pillows and fell asleep. (POA, Chapter 3, pg, 48)

Can anyone answer my questions?


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Last edited by Dreamless : March 5th, 2005 at 4:07 pm.
  #882  
Old March 6th, 2005, 3:00 pm
murmure  Female.gif murmure is offline
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I don't think English is a hard language to learn...But, sorry, I can't answer your questions (even if I also think that it's incorrect to start a sentence with "and"). By the way, I have a very silly question, what does IMO (or IMHO??) mean, I see it everywhere on forums. Feel free to correct my mistakes if there are some...


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  #883  
Old March 6th, 2005, 3:03 pm
Mundungus Fletc's Avatar
Mundungus Fletc  Male.gif Mundungus Fletc is offline
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There is a supposed grammatical rule about not starting a sentence with a conjunction but it's done all the time. And it's fairly common for some people to drop their aitches (Hs) but it's exagerrated in the film


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  #884  
Old March 6th, 2005, 3:30 pm
sparrowowl  Female.gif sparrowowl is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by murmure
I don't think English is a hard language to learn...But, sorry, I can't answer your questions (even if I also think that it's incorrect to start a sentence with "and"). By the way, I have a very silly question, what does IMO (or IMHO??) mean, I see it everywhere on forums. Feel free to correct my mistakes if there are some...


IMO=In My Opinion, IMHO=In My Humble Opinion

It is technically incorrect. When I intend to begin a sentence with a conjunction I try to imagine the sentence without it and see how it sounds. Usually the conjunction is unnecessary and a sentence would function fine without it. "And without even removing his glass, he slumped back onto his pillows and fell asleep." in this case (as in most) the point of the sentence would be conveyed just as well without the "and". It's nothing major IMO and writers use their discretion.


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  #885  
Old March 7th, 2005, 9:10 pm
Frazil  Male.gif Frazil is offline
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To quote Bill Bryson's Troublesome Words:

"The belief that and should not be used to begin a sentence is without foundation. And that's all there is to it."



  #886  
Old March 8th, 2005, 4:58 pm
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my advice : Hooucked of Fonicks werked fer me!


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  #887  
Old March 9th, 2005, 5:04 am
Dreamless  Female.gif Dreamless is offline
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Well, I just wasn't sure about it, I have seen the same thing in 'My Fair Lady' but, it seems kinda weird when you read it in a book. I don't know, I was always taught not to start a sentance with a word like 'and' or' but', like I really care, I thought that was just silly cause' I had seen people use it like that, just like JKR does. I guess, as long as you get your point across to the readers, it really doesn't matter much that you use conjunctions.


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~Writers aren't exactly people.... they're a whole bunch of people trying to be one person.~
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~Unless one is a genius, it is best to aim at being intelligible.~ Anthony Hope Hawkins

~If you want a friend in Washington, get a dog.~ Harry S. Truman


"Anyway, Dementors must be Demented dead people!"
[Me, from 'Dementors: Beasts or Beings?']
  #888  
Old March 9th, 2005, 10:42 am
leverystrange  Female.gif leverystrange is offline
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I also have a question about a few things I've heard on American TV, (maybe it's just me...) They seem to say 'BRING' in situations where I would say 'TAKE" and 'WITH' when I would say 'TO' eg:

If I am standing at my dressing table in my bedroom (putting my make-up on), my suitcases are standing at the door and my husband comes in, I would say to him: 'Please could you take my suitcases to the car.', however the Americans would usually say 'Please could you bring my suitcases to the car' ??

and...

I would say to someone: 'Could I speak to you?', whereas Americans say: 'Could I speak with you?' (I have visions of both people jabbering away together...)

Or am I just being silly?


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