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-   -   The Improve Your English Thread v3 (http://www.cosforums.com/showthread.php?t=95976)

RemusLupinFan September 29th, 2006 12:06 am

The Improve Your English Thread v3
 
Opening PostSo the idea for this thread is for Non-English speakers to get corrections and advice on their English and we English speakers to do our best to help them.

So if anyone has any questions or just wants to run something by us, go ahead.

References:
Version 1
Version 2

Last few posts from previous thread::    


  
Quote:

Originally Posted by Mundungus Fletc (Post 4093981)
In Britain a common form for first name is "given name"

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wab (Post 4094022)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Tiberius
Also, the jopurnalistic style tends to result in short paragraphs, sentences. (See? it just doesn't work outside a headline.)

27 words is the ideal length for a sentence. One sentence a par is the most easily readable and typographically attractive over a range of column widths (although anyone who lays text across more than two columns -- and double should only in extreme cirumstances with ragged right justification -- should be shot).

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tiberius (Post 4094081)
27 words? Bah. Bah, I say!

Sentences should vary in their length. They should not all be the same. If they are it gets very boring. And it can get repetitive. Just like this. This is boring.

On the other hand, sentences should not go on and on and on without a break, because then it gets very hard to read and the person who is reading it may get bored or lose track of where the sentence is going and stop reading, which means that your sentence won't get its point across at all, and even adding in punctuation to break up the flow a bit won't help.

Ideally, sentences should be varied in length. Use short sentences and long sentences, mixing them in together to get a good variety. it helps to break up the flow. This helps the reader to follow what you are writing, making your text easier to read, and giving it more impact.

This can be used to your advantage if you know how the basis behind these rules work. In my Moody Mysteries (link in my sig), I've used a single long run-on sentence to create the impression of a lot of things all happening at once.

  



Please continue. :)

Tiberius September 29th, 2006 12:17 am

Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3.0
 
Yay! Shiny new thread of grammatical goodness!

*posts so he can find it again*

And to be on topic....

IT'S (with the apostrophe) is always short for "IT IS". For any other use, even the posessive, you should use ITS.

ominous September 29th, 2006 1:57 am

Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3.0
 
I am going to study English with a TV drama "Desperate Wives"
Is "Desperate Wives" good for studying English?
The English in this TV series can be regarded so-called "standard English" if there are anything like "standard English"?
By the way, what do you call a TV series like "Desperate Wives", "Lost" or something like that?
Can I call them as a TV drama?

Masterfroggy September 29th, 2006 2:07 am

Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3.0
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ominous (Post 4095076)
I am going to study English with a TV drama "Desperate Wives"
Is "Desperate Wives" good for studying English?
The English in this TV series can be regarded so-called "standard English" if there are anything like "standard English"?
By the way, what do you call a TV series like "Desperate Wives", "Lost" or something like that?
Can I call them as a TV drama?

Not really, it is an American programme and not that well written.

Rastaban43 September 29th, 2006 2:36 am

Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3.0
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ominous (Post 4095076)
Can I call them as a TV drama?

Yes, it'd be a drama or something like that.

I think any English language programme would be good for learning English. Desparate House Wives happens to be one of the few programmes on the tellie that is amusing to watch, so I say go for it! You'd learn a lot less with a programme that had complicated English. Usually news presenters will have good grammar (since they're reading from a pre-written teleprompter.)

Quote:

Originally Posted by Masterfroggy (Post 4095101)
Not really, it is an American programme and not that well written.

I beg your pardon? We Britons don't have a monopoly on cleverly written TV programmes.

Masterfroggy September 29th, 2006 2:57 am

Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3.0
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Rastaban43 (Post 4095168)
I beg your pardon

That's all right
Quote:

Originally Posted by Rastaban43 (Post 4095168)
We Britons don't have a monopoly on cleverly written TV programmes.

Where do I say we did? :no:

Desperate House Wives is not well written because it is not well written, it has nothing to do with it not being well written because it is an American programme

The questions asked were “Is "Desperate Wives" good for studying English?” and “The English in this TV series can be regarded so-called "standard English" if there are anything like "standard English"?”

And I answered; No it’s not good for studying English it’s an American programme. The language used is not “Standard English” the language used is/or might be called Midwestern American or Central North American or Hollywood American. However Standard English it is not.

Rastaban43 September 29th, 2006 3:23 am

Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3.0
 
Hmm, I see what you were saying. But Americans speak English, whether or not they do it exactly the same as we do. There are really only minor spelling, punctuation and vocabulary differences, but most of the grammar is the same. I suppose if one only wanted to learn the way the English speak English, they'd be both limiting themselves because we aren't the only ones who speak it correctly and complicating matters due to the number of different dialects (in a very loose sense of the word) in and around our lovely little isle. In the end, any programme, English or American, would be a great learning aid for anyone studying from another language. Cartoons are actually really good because they tend to use simpler words than adult programmes like Desparate Houswives.

Mundungus Fletc September 29th, 2006 7:44 am

Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3.0
 
It's my understanding that for historical reasons the version of English taught in Korea is American English so learning from US TV programmes would be fine

ominous September 30th, 2006 3:06 am

Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3.0
 
In English, is there such an idiom "go to the house" meaning "killing someone"?
One of my colleague student said that she saw this in her dictionary.
I can't quite believe there is a such an idiom like this.
:cool:

Tiberius September 30th, 2006 3:30 am

Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3.0
 
I've never heard it....

arithmancer September 30th, 2006 3:33 am

Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3.0
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Tiberius (Post 4097588)
I've never heard it....

Neither have I.

GenevieveS September 30th, 2006 4:26 am

Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3.0
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Rastaban43 (Post 4095168)
Usually news presenters will have good grammar (since they're reading from a pre-written teleprompter.)

And sports announcers will have awful grammar. When I was in 7th grade, my English teacher taught us some basic grammar rule (I think it was about using the objective case for objects of a preposition -- like "That's for her", rather than "That's for she."), and told us we all now knew more than any given ABC Sports announcer.....

Rastaban43 October 1st, 2006 1:18 am

Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3.0
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by GenevieveS (Post 4097711)
And sports announcers will have awful grammar. When I was in 7th grade, my English teacher taught us some basic grammar rule (I think it was about using the objective case for objects of a preposition -- like "That's for her", rather than "That's for she."), and told us we all now knew more than any given ABC Sports announcer.....

I don't think that's so common anymore. It's becoming really in vogue to speak with correct grammar, and sports readers aren't any exception, what with the rise in metrosexuality, it's OK for men to like sports and be fashionable at the same time.

But I'll listen more closely the next time Liverpool's playing. Wasn't really paying attention today as I was swearing too loudly to really think about grammar.

mugglebeki October 1st, 2006 7:18 pm

Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3.0
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by RemusLupinFan (Post 4094840)
Opening PostSo the idea for this thread is for Non-English speakers to get corrections and advice on their English and we English speakers to do our best to help them.

I've been meaning to comment on this opening post. I am fully bilingual, but English is my second language (Spanish being my first). As I've read through the Forums, I've noticed so many grammatical errors and misspelled words in some posts that it is really difficult to understand what the poster is trying to say. I know that some typographical errors can go unnoticed, but not all are typos. Most of the posters here are English speakers, but I've noticed that the majority of the Non-English speakers (people from France, Spain, Germany, South America) have less spelling errors. So maybe the opening post should be addressed to all posters, as a help to "Improve Your English". I have used this thread to help me with a word I was not sure of, and you've very kindly provided the correct word, so in that respect I think this is a very helpful thread. Thank you for "listening".

Rastaban43 October 1st, 2006 10:07 pm

Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3.0
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by mugglebeki (Post 4101522)
... I've noticed that the majority of the Non-English speakers (people from France, Spain, Germany, South America) have less spelling errors ...

Nit-picking ...

You should say 'fewer spelling errors'. Because 'errors' is quantitative, you should use 'fewer' to describe it. 'Less' is reserved for words that are unquantifiable like 'milk' or 'sugar'.

Every time I do this, rotsie comes along to correct my spelling, but I want her to know that I actually realised that I had misspelled quantitative first, then corrected myself before ever mashing the 'Submit Reply' button. :p

ominous October 2nd, 2006 6:41 am

Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3.0
 
Oh! It's hilarious.
I just saw the opening sequece of the pilot episode of Desperate Housewives season 1. It's very fun. Especially the part when a neighboring woman took off a piece of paper on the blender she borrowed from a dead woman from 6 months before. "Always look at the bright side." But wasn't that too much bright? :lol: I think it's the way of living lives we, you and I, are doing.
And one thing more. I found out that you Americans call that home appliance a "blender" while we Koreans always call it a mixer.
:cool:

arithmancer October 2nd, 2006 6:46 am

Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3.0
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ominous (Post 4102928)
Oh! It's hilarious.
I just saw the opening sequece of the pilot episode of Desperate Housewives season 1. It's very fun. Especially the part when a neighboring woman took off a piece of paper on the blender she borrowed from a dead woman from 6 months before. "Always look at the bright side." But wasn't that too much bright? :lol: I think it's the way of living lives we, you and I are doing.
And one thing more. I found out that you Americans call that home appliance a "blender" while we Koreans always call it a mixer.
:cool:

In US-speak, a mixer is a different kitchen appliance. it is used to mix cake batter, cookie dough, and such. Here's a photo.

mugglebeki October 2nd, 2006 8:50 pm

Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3.0
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Rastaban43 (Post 4102049)
You should say 'fewer spelling errors'. Because 'errors' is quantitative, you should use 'fewer' to describe it. 'Less' is reserved for words that are unquantifiable like 'milk' or 'sugar'.

OK, thanks for correcting me. See that's the main problem when one speaks more than one language, sometimes a word just gets stuck and won't come out. I truly appreciate the correction.

Rastaban43 October 3rd, 2006 2:43 am

Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3.0
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by mugglebeki (Post 4103877)
OK, thanks for correcting me. See that's the main problem when one speaks more than one language, sometimes a word just gets stuck and won't come out. I truly appreciate the correction.

Don't mention it. That's what we're here for, eh what? Just slap me if I get too obnoxious.

ItsMagic October 3rd, 2006 4:59 pm

Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3.0
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by zgirnius (Post 4102941)
In US-speak, a mixer is a different kitchen appliance. it is used to mix cake batter, cookie dough, and such. Here's a photo.

I dont know if this makes much of a difference either but i think most Brits(like myself) would us the word BLENDER for crushing up fruit and making smoothes or veg for soup!
a MIXER would be anything we use to Mix something ie a spoon or i would be more familiar using the word when asking for something to add to my Barcardi!:lol:


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