Login  
 
 
Go Back   Chamber of Secrets > MuggleNet Editorials > General Editorial

Found in Translation - Part Two



Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old February 8th, 2007, 10:39 pm
more2live4  Female.gif more2live4 is offline
MuggleNet Editorial
 
Joined: 2823 days
Posts: 0
Found in Translation - Part Two

This is to discuss Found in Translation - Part Two: A Field Guide for Americans by Robbie Fischer.


Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old February 9th, 2007, 1:34 am
moe_shalash  Male.gif moe_shalash is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 3403 days
Location: a desert in arabia
Age: 24
Posts: 77
Re: Found in Translation - Part Two

oh, now I know how a Balacalava looks like, thanks


__________________
Big fan of Luna, Neville and Ginny (the other Trio)

Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old February 9th, 2007, 1:39 am
WoodsMom  Female.gif WoodsMom is offline
Student
 
Joined: 3533 days
Location: texas
Age: 44
Posts: 145
Re: Found in Translation - Part Two

This is great thanks!!

Are you doing one in terms? In OOTP I had no idea what Snogging was and was trying to figure out just what Kreacher was doing with Mr. Blacks pants?..... anyhoo, I did figure it out later...


Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old February 9th, 2007, 2:21 am
notasquib2  Female.gif notasquib2 is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 3033 days
Location: Right here. Can't you see me?
Posts: 1
Re: Found in Translation - Part Two

Another fun read! Thanks!

One correction—I don't think that the Fang in the films is a boarhound. It looks like a Neopolitan mastiff, a breed native to Italy and recently recognized by the American Kennel Club as a member of the Working group, not a hound. From what I can find, a boarhound is another name for Great Dane, although it may not be the same breed Americans recognize.


Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old February 9th, 2007, 3:41 am
SusanBones's Avatar
SusanBones  Female.gif SusanBones is offline
Inconceivable!
 
Joined: 3593 days
Location: in a galaxy far, far away
Posts: 4,090
Re: Found in Translation - Part Two

I knew a lot more of the things in this editorial than in the first one. I have even, unfortunately, had tripe. My grandmother used to make tripe soup, which I tried not to eat. Tripe is very chewy.


Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old February 9th, 2007, 4:52 am
FishEByrd  Male.gif FishEByrd is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 3459 days
Location: A fort made of books
Age: 42
Posts: 24
Re: Found in Translation - Part Two

I had tripe in Menudo. Once.

I couldn't find the perfect picture of "snogging" but I believe that's the British equivalent of "sucking face," a.k.a. "tonsil hockey." I always thought the word "snogging" evoked images of mucus being exchanged. Eurgh.

Someone asked me about "git," which is another hard thing to illustrate. I learned from Monty Python that it's pronounced with a hard "G" (like "get"). It basically means "twerp" or "jerk." Some of these things you can just pick up from the context.

It's interesting that the Brits use the word "cow," when speaking of a human female, in the same sense that they would call a male human a "git." As in: "That Skeeter cow..." In the U.S. a certain term for a female dog is used in the same way...so effectively, indeed, that most people consider it a "dirty word."

While we're talking swear words, I have a theory that the time Ron called someone a "b--" the word he was using had a double g in it and ended in "er." That's a very strong word in British usage. It doesn't mean anything in standard American.

And finally, if you've seen the first HP movie, you know that "bogey" is British for "booger." In American English, "bogey" means one of three things: a nickname for Humphrey Bogart, an approaching or pursuing enemy, and most importantly, the first name of the creature who will "get you if you don't watch out" (his last name is "man"). Or so generations of American children have been told. This is why I think the Latin American version of PS/SS mistranslates the "curse of the bogeys" as "curse of the demons" rather than "curse of the boogers."


__________________
Robbie Fischer
Hagrid lookalike

"Er - I don' want ter be rude, but who the ruddy hell are you?" - Hagrid
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old February 9th, 2007, 7:03 am
chrishris chrishris is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 3097 days
Posts: 0
Re: Found in Translation - Part Two

Jumpers are knitted items of clothing that are pulled on over the head - also known as 'pullovers' for this self evident reason.
An open fronted jumper is known as a cardigan.
All of these items can also be known as 'woollies" because traditionally they are of course knitted using wool.

PS if you mean the Crocodile Hunter please spell his name correctly
ie Steve Irwin
a small thing but important.


Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old February 9th, 2007, 7:26 am
Mundungus Fletc's Avatar
Mundungus Fletc  Male.gif Mundungus Fletc is offline
Head of the Dept of
Magical Fundraising
 
Joined: 3757 days
Location: England
Posts: 4,420
Re: Found in Translation - Part Two

Balaclavas are so called because when the British Army went to the Crimea in 1854 it was very badly equipped. As winter set in the soldiers suffered from the cold. Women in England knitted the eponymous garments and sent them out to the British main supply base at Balaclava.

And tripe is one of the most disgusting foods known to humanity

edit - in part 3 can you point out that Dumbledore's scar is a map of the London Underground (i.e. the underground railway) and not a map of underground London


__________________
Give a man a gun and he can rob a bank. Give him a bank and he can rob the world.

Last edited by Mundungus Fletc; February 9th, 2007 at 7:39 am.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old February 9th, 2007, 7:51 am
Tiberius's Avatar
Tiberius  Male.gif Tiberius is offline
Zonko's Employee
 
Joined: 4321 days
Location: umop ap!sdn w,i
Age: 35
Posts: 3,974
Re: Found in Translation - Part Two

Quote:
On the other hand, very few Americans have the word “budgerigar” or its shortened form “budgie” in their vocabulary. I’m still not sure exactly how to pronounce the longer word.
They are a common species here in Australia, both as a pet, and as a wild bird in the more arid parts of the country. “Budgerigar” is pronounced BUDGE-er-ee-gar. I believe the word is an Australian Aboriginal name for this bird.


__________________

If this text is blue, you're going too fast.


Proud three-time winner of the Flirtiest Member Hogsie!
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old February 9th, 2007, 8:10 am
kitten2cat  Female.gif kitten2cat is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 2949 days
Location: USA
Posts: 3
Re: Found in Translation - Part Two

I totaly love the idea of these editorials! It has helped me a lot, a lot better than google anyways. Isn't it cool that we (American's specificaly) know about all this 'culture' and it stems for HP? Horray for the fandom!


__________________
I LOVE HARRY POTTER!

My motto: I've confessed, I'm obsessed!
My Theory: Book 7 will end in 1997, Book 1 (origianaly) was realesed in 1997. Coincidence? I don't belive it is.

WOMBAT Grade 1: Outstanding!
WOMBAT Grade 2: Exceeds Expectaions!




Join the movement to kick Peter Pettigrew out of the Marauders!
Make James, Sirius, Remus, Fred and George the REAL Marauders!
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old February 9th, 2007, 12:24 pm
lilyvanillie lilyvanillie is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 2984 days
Posts: 0
Re: Found in Translation - Part Two

HAHA! These editorials have made me laugh so much! I never realised how many different words America has from Britain!


Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old February 9th, 2007, 12:48 pm
Nial  Male.gif Nial is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 2791 days
Posts: 0
Re: Found in Translation - Part Two

Moleskin isn't made of moles (blecch). My dictionary says: "A thick strong cotton fabric with a shaved pile surface." But in the films Hagrid's coat looks to me as if it is made of moles...


Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old February 9th, 2007, 12:52 pm
Linda_Carrig  Female.gif Linda_Carrig is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 3314 days
Location: Alvor, Portugal
Age: 63
Posts: 1
Re: Found in Translation - Part Two

Great editorial! The dog in the movie is indeed a Napolitan Dog. A boarhound is about the size of a Great Dane but I believe it has wiry hair.
Here in Portugal they have a dish made of tripe; it's called dobrada and it is this that McGonagall offers to Trelawney at the Christmas feast in the Portuguese version.
A jumper is a pullover sweater usually wool. Where did this word came from? I have no idea.
Looking forward to the next installment


Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old February 9th, 2007, 1:57 pm
HP_hedgehog  Male.gif HP_hedgehog is offline
Second Year
 
Joined: 3144 days
Age: 24
Posts: 160
Re: Found in Translation - Part Two

Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda_Carrig View Post
Great editorial! The dog in the movie is indeed a Napolitan Dog. A boarhound is about the size of a Great Dane but I believe it has wiry hair.
Here in Portugal they have a dish made of tripe; it's called dobrada and it is this that McGonagall offers to Trelawney at the Christmas feast in the Portuguese version.
A jumper is a pullover sweater usually wool. Where did this word came from? I have no idea.
Looking forward to the next installment
Well, logically speaking... a sweater is something you pull over your head...


__________________


Dare and feed it milk...?

Offering milk only annoys Knarls compared to spoiling... and you wouldn't want to know what an infuriated Knarl will do to you, now would you?
Join the ASA today and help prevent spoilers!.


W.O.M.B.A.T. Grade 1: Outstanding
W.O.M.B.A.T. Grade 2: Exceeds Expectations..
W.O.M.B.A.T. Grade 3: Outstanding

Average: Outstanding!
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old February 9th, 2007, 2:45 pm
Boromir  Male.gif Boromir is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 3330 days
Location: spinners end
Age: 24
Posts: 1
Re: Found in Translation - Part Two

The more and more I read of the basic things american's can't understand, I mean "snogging", "balacalva" "trainers" and "jumpers" are basic fundamental things in helping you understand a certain situations. How anyone could not understand all these and still claim that they enjoy the books as much a someone who can is beyond me.


Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old February 9th, 2007, 2:58 pm
muggles_rock  Female.gif muggles_rock is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 3463 days
Location: Arizona, USA
Age: 42
Posts: 1
Re: Found in Translation - Part Two

Quote:
Originally Posted by Boromir View Post
The more and more I read of the basic things american's can't understand, I mean "snogging", "balacalva" "trainers" and "jumpers" are basic fundamental things in helping you understand a certain situations. How anyone could not understand all these and still claim that they enjoy the books as much a someone who can is beyond me.

Oh - come one, we are not idiots. It's just a difference in culture. These are not main points or concepts. What the mind does not know, it fills in with what is known. Besides, we find it enjoyable to learn about things in European culture. That is part of the fun for me. I feel like saying something nasty to you but I will refrain.


Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old February 9th, 2007, 3:50 pm
The_Old_One  Male.gif The_Old_One is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 2792 days
Location: Canada
Posts: 9
Re: Found in Translation - Part Two

Thanks so much for these two, and (in advance) the third article in this series. As a Canadian, and one over 50, I am familiar with almost all the terms and descriptions used by the esteemed JKR in the books. In fact, here in Canada, we get the British version, so when I read about Ron's (and Harry's) Christmas jumpers, I knew they were sweaters. I DID wonder what my American friends would think them to be, as well as what they might make of balaclavas, hosepipes, tripe and puddings (the term "pudding", by the way is used very differently in Canada these days than it used to be - a pudding, in the British sense is, essentially, a dessert (see Dickens' A Christmas Carol, when Tiny Tim extolls the virtues of a wonderful Christmas pudding). Nowadays, we here in Canada seem to use the North American harmonised version of "pudding", meaning something creamy and thick in a bowl, usually deriving from a box with the word Jello on it, though sometimes made from scratch.

Just one interesting note regarding Balaclavas. Indeed, the term came from the type of woven or knitted helmet worn by the British in the Battle of Balaclava. These head coverings were, apparently known as "protectors" prior to the battle in question. Why, then, the name change? Well, it seems there were TWO articles of clothing that were renamed as a result of that battle, because of the fame and sacrifice of the soldiers. The battle of Balaclava was none other than the famed "Charge of the Light Brigade", lead by the Earl of Cardigan. You guessed it fans! To commemorate that ill-fated charge, the knitted sweater the Earl wore was forever to be known as the cardigan, and the "protector" the soldiers wore, which didn't protect 300 of those 600, was renamed the Balaclava.

In any case, as you can see, I love this sort of information and look forward to Installment 3. Thanks to all who have contributed to this discussion!!

The_Old_One


Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old February 9th, 2007, 4:03 pm
SusanBones's Avatar
SusanBones  Female.gif SusanBones is offline
Inconceivable!
 
Joined: 3593 days
Location: in a galaxy far, far away
Posts: 4,090
Re: Found in Translation - Part Two

Balaclava is not unknown to winter athletes in America. I own one, in fact. I think that people who live in the warmer climates of the USA would be less likely to see one or use one, though. They are usually only worn in extremely cold weather.


Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old February 9th, 2007, 5:06 pm
embememu  Undisclosed.gif embememu is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 3403 days
Posts: 12
Re: Found in Translation - Part Two

There's so many words that seem so common to me. It's weird. And i've never heard of a jumper being a type of dress. It's just a sweater or woolly top type thing. also, to my mind the word budgie usually applies to the small blue birds.


__________________
"You said to us once before, that there was time to turn back if we wanted to. We've had time, haven't we?"
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old February 9th, 2007, 5:37 pm
lafemmenissa  Female.gif lafemmenissa is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 3159 days
Location: Santa Fe
Age: 33
Posts: 81
Re: Found in Translation - Part Two

Hooray for part two! I knew all of the clothing, but as for tripe (ewwwwww) and the budgie, I had no clue what those were. How cute is that Scops Owl, by the way? No wonder Pig has a hard time with large packages. I gathered that he was small, but not that small! What about Eagle Owls? Those seem fairly popular with the antagonists of these books. Also, it's pretty common now in the U.S. for people to take cloth shopping bags with them to the grocery stores, especially the health food stores, and to farmer's markets.
And to you Brits who just can't believe that we "Yanks" don't know some of this stuff, you'd be surprised as to what you don't know about our culture, so ease up a bit, eh? We're all enjoying learning about your culture. You should be flattered.

best,
la femme


__________________
W.O.M.B.A.T. Grade One: Outstanding
W.O.M.B.A.T. Grade Two: Exceeds Expectations
Join the ASA today and help prevent spoilers!
Reply With Quote
Reply
Go Back  Chamber of Secrets > MuggleNet Editorials > General Editorial

Bookmarks


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 7:15 am.


Powered by: vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Original content is Copyright MMII - MMVIII, CoSForums.com. All Rights Reserved.
Other content (posts, images, etc) is Copyright its respective owners.