Login  
 
 
Go Back   Chamber of Secrets > MuggleNet Editorials > General Editorial

Found in Translation - Part Three



Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old February 10th, 2007, 4:09 am
more2live4  Female.gif more2live4 is offline
MuggleNet Editorial
 
Joined: 2781 days
Posts: 0
Found in Translation - Part Three

This is to discuss Found in Translation - Part 3: What's in a Name? by Robbie Fischer.


Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old February 10th, 2007, 6:56 am
bribe
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Re: Found in Translation - Part Three

Three well written and informative editorials. It always helps to know what people in different countries mean when they use colloquialisms.

Just one note. Sirius is actually a trinary star. The two main stars are in turn orbited by a faint third star that was only discovered in the 1930's. Other than this well done.


Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old February 10th, 2007, 7:20 am
kerri  Undisclosed.gif kerri is offline
Second Year
 
Joined: 3205 days
Posts: 221
Re: Found in Translation - Part Three

I love this editorial. The funny thing is, Ive never had trouble with the English slang, but I was taken with JKR's imagination when it came to names. My favorite names in the series are Sirius Black and Severus Snape.

I never knew their was a real Severus....hmm, kinda makes you think why she named him after a tyrant king. Great editorial, and thanks!

How about pictures of the different owls, I've always been curious about the animals and pets in the books. Like Draco's eagle owl.


Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old February 10th, 2007, 8:24 am
Mundungus Fletc's Avatar
Mundungus Fletc  Male.gif Mundungus Fletc is offline
Head of the Dept of
Magical Fundraising
 
Joined: 3716 days
Location: England
Posts: 4,409
Re: Found in Translation - Part Three

Septimius Severus was not much of a tyrant compared to other Roman Emperors - he was known to be sympathetic to Christians and did not persecute them personally. Interestingly he died at York.


__________________
Give a man a gun and he can rob a bank. Give him a bank and he can rob the world.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old February 10th, 2007, 11:56 am
another_pleb  Undisclosed.gif another_pleb is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 3203 days
Posts: 0
Re: Found in Translation - Part Three

An interesting article. However, what you wrote about humbugs is incorrect. Humbugs are famous for their black and white striped appearance.

Hydrangeas are famous for their differing colour depending on if they are planted on acid, (pink petals) or alkali soil (blue petals).

Apart from that, very good.


Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old February 10th, 2007, 1:54 pm
loona  Female.gif loona is offline
Third Year
 
Joined: 3550 days
Location: florida
Age: 35
Posts: 373
Re: Found in Translation - Part Three

I just read both part 2 and 3 ... just wanted to say thanks again!!!


Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old February 10th, 2007, 2:59 pm
julieann  Female.gif julieann is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 2751 days
Posts: 0
Re: Found in Translation - Part Three

very very good

only dumbledore had a scar of the london underground, not a birthmark.

this was very helpful to someone who's never gone farther than canada, and therfore not to savvy with all the brittish slang. thanks!


Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old February 10th, 2007, 4:39 pm
SandyT  Undisclosed.gif SandyT is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 3307 days
Posts: 0
Re: Found in Translation - Part Three

All three editorials were excellent and extremly helpful! Thanks for the pictures.

As an add-on. A narcissa (daffodil) is also poisonous. Gophers who will rip through a garden, from underground, and eat the bulbs of tulips and such, won't touch a daffodil, because they are poisonous.


Again, excellent work!


Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old February 10th, 2007, 4:48 pm
T_Brightwater T_Brightwater is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 3096 days
Posts: 0
Re: Found in Translation - Part Three

Very good! I lived in England for two and a half years, and even I wasn't sure what "spotted dick" was.

Hermione does have a mythological namesake, also - she was the daughter of Menelaus and Helen of Troy.

Sirius's uncle Alphard is also named for a star - I think it's in one of the Dippers. And Merope is one of the Pleiades; according to some versions of the story, she's the faint star that you could only see if you had very good eyesight, because she, a demigoddess, had married a mortal. Not only does this sound rather like Merope Gaunt and Tom Riddle, but the star name makes me wonder if her mother was a Black. (cf. Draco Malfoy, who has a constellation name and whose mother was a Black.)

There are several saints named Severus, including Severus of Antioch, who, interestingly enough, is a saint in the Oriental Orthodox churches (Coptic, etc.) but considered a heretic in the Eastern (Greek, Russian, Byzantine, etc.) Orthodox churches.

And would you believe there was a Saint Nymphodora? She and her two sisters were healers and virgin martyrs. Their feast day is September 10.



Last edited by T_Brightwater; February 11th, 2007 at 7:23 pm. Reason: misspelled word
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old February 10th, 2007, 5:05 pm
lafemmenissa  Female.gif lafemmenissa is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 3117 days
Location: Santa Fe
Age: 32
Posts: 81
Re: Found in Translation - Part Three

Fantastic! I really enjoy reading about name origins to see what they might infer about a particular character's personality.
Also, very impressive posts above! Very intellegent group we've got reading these books.

best,
la femme


__________________
W.O.M.B.A.T. Grade One: Outstanding
W.O.M.B.A.T. Grade Two: Exceeds Expectations
Join the ASA today and help prevent spoilers!
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old February 10th, 2007, 5:33 pm
embememu  Undisclosed.gif embememu is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 3361 days
Posts: 12
Re: Found in Translation - Part Three

That was the best one yet! i loved the section with flowers and stars because even though i'm English I don't know too much about flowers and stars. The picture of the narcissus looks really like a daffodil. i assume they are the same... i'm a nitwit.


__________________
"You said to us once before, that there was time to turn back if we wanted to. We've had time, haven't we?"
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old February 11th, 2007, 12:12 am
FishEByrd  Male.gif FishEByrd is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 3417 days
Location: A fort made of books
Age: 41
Posts: 24
Re: Found in Translation - Part Three

I don't know if a narcissus and a daffodil are exactly the same, but I believe the Jonquil is similar if not identical to the narcissus.


__________________
Robbie Fischer
Hagrid lookalike

"Er - I don' want ter be rude, but who the ruddy hell are you?" - Hagrid
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old February 11th, 2007, 12:45 am
abbeyroad  Undisclosed.gif abbeyroad is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 2979 days
Location: In front of my computer
Posts: 0
Re: Found in Translation - Part Three

I knew most of the flowers, a few of the stars, and a few names from mythology, but the names I didn't know were intriguing. The map of the London Underground certainly changed my mental picture of Dubledore's scar! Thanks once again for these great editorials.


Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old February 11th, 2007, 1:42 am
ruse  Undisclosed.gif ruse is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 2954 days
Posts: 12
Re: Found in Translation - Part Three

These were very enjoyable...thank you for the time you put into this. I think Horace has the heart of a poet!!! His name fits.


Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old February 11th, 2007, 2:20 am
T_Brightwater T_Brightwater is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 3096 days
Posts: 0
Re: Found in Translation - Part Three

Narcissus is the name of the genus which contains daffodils, jonquils, and narcissi; I've heard all of those common names used interchangeably. One species of Narcissus is N. jonquilla.


Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old February 11th, 2007, 3:07 am
frizzle  Undisclosed.gif frizzle is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 3107 days
Location: Philadelphia PA
Posts: 2
Re: Found in Translation - Part Three

Re: eating kippered fish for breakfast: Haven't you ever eaten bagels and lox? Lox is just another form of salted smoked fish. Salting and smoking were methods of preserving food before refridgeration.

Re: Jumper. In the U.S., it is a sleeveless dress which you wear over a blouse. In the U.K., it is a sweater.

Very clever, useful editorials. Thanks!


Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old February 11th, 2007, 4:58 am
Chas  Male.gif Chas is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 3465 days
Location: Chicago, IL, USA
Age: 73
Posts: 21
Re: Found in Translation - Part Three

A great series of editorials. Thanks!

Technically, the Andromeda galaxy is called the Galaxy in Andromeda (or the Nebula in Andromeda if you are old enough). To the naked eye it looks like a fuzzy star (unless you live in Chicago where any sort of stars is a rarity ), which happens to be in the constellation Andromeda.


__________________
Chas

W.O.M.B.A.T. Grade 1: Exceeds Expectations
W.O.M.B.A.T. Grade 2: Exceeds Expectations
W.O.M.B.A.T. Grade 3: Exceeds Expectations

Last edited by Chas; February 11th, 2007 at 7:28 pm. Reason: added a minor comment
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old February 11th, 2007, 6:52 am
riazul  Female.gif riazul is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 3883 days
Location: India
Age: 24
Posts: 0
Re: Found in Translation - Part Three

I read all 3 parts and I must say they were very well written not to mention informative.. Helped me in picturing certain things which I had previously been unable to.. However I'd like to add one bit of info.. I don't know if anyone has already mentioned this but 'Padma' means 'Lotus' in Sanskrit and is also another name for a goddess in Hindu Mythology.


__________________
I am a Pottermaniac!!
I am a GRYFFINDOR!!
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old February 11th, 2007, 11:42 am
FishEByrd  Male.gif FishEByrd is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 3417 days
Location: A fort made of books
Age: 41
Posts: 24
Re: Found in Translation - Part Three

Quote:
Originally Posted by frizzle View Post
Re: eating kippered fish for breakfast: Haven't you ever eaten bagels and lox? Lox is just another form of salted smoked fish. Salting and smoking were methods of preserving food before refridgeration.

Re: Jumper. In the U.S., it is a sleeveless dress which you wear over a blouse. In the U.K., it is a sweater.

Very clever, useful editorials. Thanks!
Somehow, lox was never around at home for breakfast use. It's not the sort of thing my family does. Whenever I had lox it was always either a lunchtime or a late-night run to a Jewish deli.


__________________
Robbie Fischer
Hagrid lookalike

"Er - I don' want ter be rude, but who the ruddy hell are you?" - Hagrid
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old February 11th, 2007, 12:10 pm
Linda_Carrig  Female.gif Linda_Carrig is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 3273 days
Location: Alvor, Portugal
Age: 62
Posts: 1
Re: Found in Translation - Part Three

Brilliant!
Just one thing: in England, they don't say. "What's for dessert?", they say "What's for pudd?", which is a short form of the word "pudding".
I've never had kippers myself but I do eat a lot of fish; fresh, pickled, salted or canned (like tuna or sardines). Folks, be sure to eat some kind of fish now and then--it's good for you and tasty too.


Reply With Quote
Reply
Go Back  Chamber of Secrets > MuggleNet Editorials > General Editorial

Bookmarks


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 2:53 pm.


Powered by: vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Original content is Copyright MMII - MMVIII, CoSForums.com. All Rights Reserved.
Other content (posts, images, etc) is Copyright its respective owners.