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HP and its relation to Greek Mythology



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  #21  
Old October 5th, 2006, 1:48 am
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Re: Merope and the Myth of Sisyphus

There are lots of charactors in the book named for stars. Like Sirius and Remus. Then there are flower names like Pansy, Narsissa, and Petunia, even Lavender. Could it be that all flower named people are evil? Is Lavender going to be evil? I don't know. Are all star named people good? And some names which are found in history, such as famous alchemists. I don't know how all these are related though. Looking at the origin for a name may lead us to a clue or at least some understanding of what Jo was thinking when she picked that name for the charactors name. I don't know what we can find out, but it is nice to know where the name may have come from.


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  #22  
Old October 5th, 2006, 3:16 am
AnneBonny  Female.gif AnneBonny is offline
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Re: Merope and the Myth of Sisyphus

I don't doubt that that is precisely what JK Rowling had in mind when she gave the character that particular name. We've seen on numerous occasions references to history and literature in these books. I think that's one of the things that has made them such instant classics- although it is "pop" culture, it also has all the literary elements of the classics, with multiple levels of meaning to many parts of the book, including words and names used.

For example, Remus Lupin. Remus in mythology is one of the two brothers who were the sons of the god of war (Mars), cast into the Tiber river and rescued and nursed by a wolf (aha!). Lupin of course also means "wolf" in latin.

I don't know how relevant the story of Romulus and Remus is to Harry Potter in general- if it is a simple connection to the wolf (a clue when we first meet the character), or if there is more to it. Remus, according to mythology, is killed by his brother Romulus. Hopefully this is not an implication for Remus Lupin's fate.


Sirius as well is derived from mythology. He was the loyal hunting dog of Orion. When Artemis was tricked into killing Orion to demonstrate her archery skills (Apollo challenged her to hit that "speck out in the ocean"), she made him into a constellation. Sirius the dog was unwaveringly loyal and would never stop searching for Orion, so Artemis placed him in the heavens as well with his master. A comment on the general character of Sirius Black?

Sirius in Egyptian mythology was the most important star in the heavens- responsible for providing heat and light in the summer. Sirius represented the goddess Sothis, bringing fertility and the new year. She is also the guide to the afterlife for the pharoahs.

Sirius is the most powerful star, the most important, the most influential- the center of the super-ego and the personal identity. Sirius connects people with the stars.



Last edited by AnneBonny; October 5th, 2006 at 3:35 am.
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  #23  
Old October 5th, 2006, 4:41 am
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Re: Merope and the Myth of Sisyphus

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Originally Posted by Kidney Pie View Post
Then there are flower names like Pansy, Narsissa, and Petunia, even Lavender. Could it be that all flower named people are evil? Is Lavender going to be evil? I don't know. Are all star named people good?
Well... Pansy is bad....
Narcissa is bad though... (but it seems she is bad in a good way... )
to be evil, you don't have to love... like Voldemort... but she loves her family...
we can just label her as selfish to the point she can be evil for her and her loved ones happiness...
Petunia... I still hope she is not that evil...

and the highlight....

I thought Lily is a kind of a flower too???


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  #24  
Old October 5th, 2006, 5:14 am
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Re: Merope and the Myth of Sisyphus

Well, not all star people are good, because Bellatrix and various other members of the Black family are named after stars and are far from good. Sirius's associations with dogs (especially big, powerful ones) are highlighted by his name, and he was a very faithful friend, especially to James, whose animal form was that of a dominant male creature (and you don't have to be servile to be faithful).
The flower names seem to be chosen because the character is like the flower. Lavender is very sweet and pretty, and Lavender is quite a girly-girl; Petunias are delicate ornamental flowers with a sweet scent and a sort of prissy demeanor; lilies are big, graceful flowers that smell gorgeous but are also associated with death (why I don't know). Pansies are cutesy little flowers, which is I suppose what Parkinson aspires to be.
It's interesting that Sisyphus's son was Odysseus (if I remember correctly), who was exceptionally intelligent and had a gift for persuading others to agree with him and do his bidding (the other Greeks said he had a silver tongue, and he came up with the idea for the Trojan Horse); I see a definite parallel with Voldemort. If Odysseus attended Hogwarts, he would be a Slytherin.


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  #25  
Old October 6th, 2006, 12:40 am
AnneBonny  Female.gif AnneBonny is offline
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Re: Merope and the Myth of Sisyphus

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kidney Pie View Post
There are lots of charactors in the book named for stars. Like Sirius and Remus. Then there are flower names like Pansy, Narsissa, and Petunia, even Lavender. Could it be that all flower named people are evil? Is Lavender going to be evil? I don't know. Are all star named people good? And some names which are found in history, such as famous alchemists. I don't know how all these are related though. Looking at the origin for a name may lead us to a clue or at least some understanding of what Jo was thinking when she picked that name for the charactors name. I don't know what we can find out, but it is nice to know where the name may have come from.


I don't think it could be so simple as "flower = evil" and "star = good" but I do think that these things have other meanings sometimes. Narcissa especially seems to be a very appropriate name. Narcissus in mythology was so vain that he fell in love with his own reflection (as a result of various different curses depending on which story you follow- the goddess Nemesis cursed him on behalf of the nymph Echo who loved him unrequietedly and pined away, or a young man named Ameinias was in love with Narcissus who was so dispassionate he sent Ameinias a gift of a sword- with which he killed himself on Narcissus' doorstep and cursed him to know the pain of unrequited love). Either way, Narcissus did nothing but stare at his own reflection in the river, entranced, and pined away out of love for himself and died.

Narcissa the name instantly implies vanity. Although we have not seen much of this particular character, that trait certainly applies to the rest of her family.


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  #26  
Old October 6th, 2006, 5:53 am
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Re: Merope and the Myth of Sisyphus

Quote:
Originally Posted by AnneBonny View Post
Narcissa the name instantly implies vanity. Although we have not seen much of this particular character, that trait certainly applies to the rest of her family.
JK must have mistaken to name them...

Lucius Narcissus
Draco Narcissus
Narcissa Narcissus...

they all share the same traits...
Vanity for their family...
glory for them...


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  #27  
Old November 26th, 2006, 10:52 am
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Re: Merope and the Myth of Sisyphus

im going to have to sleep on this on and soak up all of this.


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  #28  
Old November 26th, 2006, 1:21 pm
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Re: Merope and the Myth of Sisyphus

You may also want to check out HP and its relation to Greek Mythology.


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  #29  
Old December 13th, 2006, 7:18 pm
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Re: HP and its relation to Greek Mythology

Quote:
Originally Posted by Peg View Post
Thus my assertion that Luna is essentially equivalent to Artemis. Here it is from encyclopaedia mythica:

They're seperate, and yet they're not. Luna is a part, or aspect, of Artemis/Diana. Anyway, now to make this relavent to HP. Does this mean anything concerning Luna Lovegood? Like I said a while ago, Artemis is represented by a stag. You know, James's animagus form. Luna Lovegood is able to hear the voices beyond the veil, and recognizes them for what they are in OotP. Perhaps she will somehow play a role in forging a connection of some sort between Harry and his parents in Book 7.

Luna's name also puts her in a smallish group of people associated with the moon: Luna Lovegood, Remus Lupin (werewolf, remember), Fenrir Greyback (sme reason as for Lupin), Theodore Nott and his Death Eater father (Nott is the Norse moon goddess), and Ollivander ("moonlike" eyes). I know most of those have nothing to do with Greek myth, but since I'm discussing Luna's name, I thought I'd mention them. Can anyone think of anything else connecting these people? For one thing, if we asume Ollivander is good (he appears to be fairly close to Dumbledore, since he writes about Harry's wand), they're equally split between good and evil. OK, fine, I know that's off topic, you don't have to answer (unless, of course, there's any relevant moon symbloism in Greek mythology).
I haven't noticed that there was so much moon-stuff in HP! Not to forget the "half-moon-spectacles" of Dumbledore. There was no one named "selene" yet or was there? (Greek word for "moon")

Quote:
Just thought I'd mention something no one's brought up yet: the spinx is actually originally from Greek mythology. It features in the story of Oedipus, the trajic hero of Sophocles's Oedipus trilogy (Oedipus Rex, Oedipus at Colonus, and Antigone). In the story, when Oedipus is a young man, he travels to Thebes to get away from his adoptive parents (who he doesn't know adopted him) when he hears a prophesy saying that he'll kill his father. When he reaches the city, he finds that the sphinx is not letting anyone in or out unless they answer its riddle, and that it kills everyone who gets the answer wrong (which has been everyone who has guessed). The riddle is (paraphrased) "what animal goes on four legs in the morning, two legs at noon, and three legs in the evening?" (the answer is a man- we crawl, then we walk, and then we use a cane). Oedipus gets the answer right (like Harry does in GoF), and the sphink kills itself. I'm not saying that Harry's a parallel to Oedipus, but I think the story may be relavent, since we have had a sphinx giving a riddle in the HP serries. What so you all think?
I've noticed that too and got led to this threads by a mod because I started an own thread about this. I find a comparison between the oracle in "Rex Oedipus" and the prophecy in HP very interesting.

Let me tell the important happenings in the story of "Rex Oedipus" for this comparison:

Oedipus has been predicted to murder his father and marry his mother before he was even born. So his father Laios abandoned him in the wilderness that he may die. Luckily he was found and brought into another kingdom where he was raised as the son of the king and never told about his true identity. When the oracle told him he is to murder his father and marry his mother, he left his adoptiv-father which he believed was his real father so he may not harm him. On his way on another kingdom he came to a crossroad and was blocked by a coatch. Though he as passenger should have waited as it has been the custom he murdered the driver and all his companions. Inside the coach was the king of Thebia his real father, who he murdered too without knowledge of his identity. Then he rescued Thebia from the sphinx and became the king. So he married his mother without knowing what he was doing. In the end the gods were angry at Thebia and deases were spreading. Asking the seer about the source of all this he told Oedipus about the murder of his father, but Oedipus didn't believe the seer because he had done everything to prevent the prophecy from becoming true in his whole life. The story has a very sad ending: after Oedipus got the evidence presented he went crazy and blinded himself.


Interesting aspects are:
- Voldemort and Oedipus fulfilled the prophecy/oracle by trying to prevent it coming true
- yet there can argued against destiny because both men made mistakes in their trying to prevent the prophecies coming true:

- Oedipus didn't know that his adoptiv father wasn't his real father and he didn't talk with him about the prophecy in the first place so he didn't learn early enough (although he came across some hints that his "father" wasn't his real one)
- this and Oedipus constantly blocking up people who want to advise him shows that he thinks he can solve this problem all alone like he has solved the riddle of the Sphinx (but notice: while there are contests in ancient greece of riddle solving an oracle isn't an riddle and is interpreted in the community)
- he also didn't know the content of the oracle because he didn't know how to interpret an oracle at all: he took it all literally instead of metaphorically

- Voldemort didn't know the whole content of the prophecy (like Oedipus not knowing about his father) and didn't wait to learn more either
- he has also a similar arrogance, I think
- he didn't know that prophecies don't have to come true (like Dumbledore said in OotP) so he also took everything literally

but there's a similar situation with Harry too, remember Harry's "vision" of Sirius being tortured?
- by trying to help Sirius he actually caused his death (in the chain of happenings) because:

- he didn't question the reality: how the two most wanted wizards can just walk into the ministery of magic in broad daylight
- he didn't listen to Hermiony who warned him about his "people-saving-thing" which can also be regarded as some kind of arrogance
- he didn't question the dream, he took everything "literally"

Those similarities make me think that Rowling is showing mediate characters like the ancient drama:
- they have little faults which cause great problems when they get in high positions
- those faults come into play because the characters don't accept help
- they have different ways to choose and choose the wrong because they are not listening to advice or too impatient to wait to learn more (notice the crossroad as metaphor in "Rex Oedipus")
- they commit hybris (overstepping rules and customs, going to far, arrogance)

Sorry for the large post, but this was going on in my head for a while. Opinions?


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Last edited by Passionfruit; December 13th, 2006 at 7:24 pm.
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  #30  
Old February 1st, 2007, 3:19 am
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Re: HP and its relation to Greek Mythology

I found this on wikipedia, could this be use of Nagini?
Asclepius, the son of Apollo, learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one serpent bringing another (which Asclepius himself had fatally wounded) healing herbs. To prevent the entire human race from becoming immortal under Asclepius's care, Zeus killed him with a bolt of lightning. Asclepius' death at the hands of Zeus illustrates man's inability to challenge the natural order that separates mortal men from the gods. In honor of Asclepius, snakes were often used in healing rituals. Non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor in dormitories where the sick and injured slept. In The Library, Apollodorus claimed that Athena gave Asclepius a vial of blood from the Gorgons. Gorgon blood had magical properties: if taken from the left side of the Gorgon, it was a fatal poison; from the right side, the blood was capable of bringing the dead back to life.
Sorry if someone else posted this already.. I found it interesting. It would give Nagini some purpose


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  #31  
Old February 18th, 2007, 1:00 am
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Re: HP and its relation to Greek Mythology

Another person: Alecto the Death Eater

From wikipedia
Alecto (Greek: Ἀληκτώ, "the implacable") is one of the Erinyes in Greek mythology. According to Hesiod, she was the daughter of Gaea fertilized by the blood spilled from Uranus when Cronus castrated him. She is the sister of Tisiphone and Megaera.
Alecto is the Erinye with the job of castigating the moral crimes (such as anger), especially if they are against other people. Her function is very similar to Nemesis, with the difference that the latter's function is to castigate crimes against the gods.
Alecto appeared in Virgil's Aeneid, and also in Dante's Inferno as one of the three Erinyes.


Funny to see that the Alecto in the Greek Mythology punished other people for their crime, while she's a bad guy herself in the HP series. Alecto is also "unceasing" in the Mythology, maybe a hint at her unceasing giggling during the tower scene.

------------------

And the other Death Eater Amycus

From wikipedia
In Greek mythology, Amycus was the son of Poseidon and Melia. He was a boxer and King of the Bebryces, a mythical people in Bithynia. Polydeuces beat him in a boxing match when the Argonauts passed through Bithynia.
He was also a prominent Trojan during the Trojan War. He married Theona and had one son: Mimas.


and ...

Other Amycus in Greek Mythology
In Greek mythology, Amycus was a centaur. This son of Ophion attended Pirithous' wedding and fought against the Lapiths, where he was killed by Pelates. The minor planet 55576 Amycus is named after this centaur.


Again is also Amycus displayed as a good character in the Mythology. But the Centaur Amycus has one similarity to other bad people in the series, the relation to Astrology.

-------------

Also Argus Filch is probably or quite sure named after the Argus in the Greek Mythology.

Actually there are five Argus in the Mythology. List

But the first one is the most "suspicious" one.

Wiki - Argus
1. Argus Panoptes (Argus "all eyes") is a giant with a hundred eyes. He was also the nymph Io's brother.


Seeing that Argus Filch has his eyes everywhere in Hogwarts it's not wonder when he's named after the 100eyed giant.


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Last edited by Tenshi; February 18th, 2007 at 1:09 am.
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  #32  
Old February 20th, 2007, 1:49 am
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Re: HP and its relation to Greek Mythology

Severus was born to a witch, Eileen Prince, and a muggle, Tobias Snape. Thus making him a half-blood.
Perseus, the hero of Argolis, was the son of Zeus and Acrisius' daughter Danae. Thus, making him a demi-god, half mortal half god.
Again another similarity / parallel between the Perseus myth and Severus Snape.
Tobias Snape was very cruel both to his wife and his son.
Acrisius killed the nurse and enclosed Danae and her son in a wooden chest and threw them into the sea.

“ “ Severus, ” said Dumbledore, turning to Snape, “ You know what I must ask you to do. If you are ready . . . if you are prepared . . . ”
“ I am, ” said Snape.
He looked slightly paler than usual, and his cold, black eyes glittered strangely.
“ Then, good luck, ” said Dumbledore, and he watched, with a trace of apprehension on his face, as Snape swept wordlessly after Sirius. ”
Pg. 713 Chapter thirty-six The Parting of the Ways GoF American version
The next morning, when other guests arrived with horses and Perseus was empty handed, Polydectes demanded from Danae's son to bring him the promised present. — Perseus myth
Headmaster Albus Dumbledore asked Severus to resume his role as spy, still at great peril to himself. There is a great similarity here where Polydectes demands that Perseus bring him the head of the Gorgon, Medusa. Thus sending him on an angst-ridden journey.
Perseus and Andromeda legend. There have been numerous discussions as to whom has loved Severus Snape aside from his mother. I believe that this legend echoes / parallels that it was Lily Evans.
Perseus took his revenge on Polydectes by turning him into stone, using Medusa’s head.
Snape raises his wand and with an Avada Kedavra a green jet shoots from his wan and hits Dumbledore squarely in the chest. Dumbledore is blasted into the air, for a split second seems to hang suspended beneath the shining skull of the Dark Mark and falls slowly backward like a doll over the battlement and out of sight. Here Severus Snape kills the Headmaster out of duty paralleling the turning Polydectes to stone via Medusa’s head.
As you can see there are many parallels, if not similarities to the Perseus myth in regards to Severus Snape. Severus Snape rearranged is Perseus Evans. Although the way I see it is Perseus / Evans. Joanna Kathleen Rowling has said that Severus Snape is an anagram. From that one can get save Evans. I postulate that Lily Evans Potter is an anagram. From that one can get save Snape. Going back to the Perseus / Andromeda legend one can say that Andromeda could be Lily Evans. Or if you just use that alone by itself, you can get save Sev.


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  #33  
Old March 9th, 2007, 2:35 am
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Re: HP and its relation to Greek Mythology

Quote:
Originally posted by Passionfruit:
I haven't noticed that there was so much moon-stuff in HP! Not to forget the "half-moon-spectacles" of Dumbledore. There was no one named "selene" yet or was there? (Greek word for "moon")
No Selene yet (that I've noticed, at any rate), but it was an older name for the moon goddess, later Artemis/Diana.

Quote:
I've noticed that too and got led to this threads by a mod because I started an own thread about this. I find a comparison between the oracle in "Rex Oedipus" and the prophecy in HP very interesting.

Let me tell the important happenings in the story of "Rex Oedipus" for this comparison:

Oedipus has been predicted to murder his father and marry his mother before he was even born. So his father Laios abandoned him in the wilderness that he may die. Luckily he was found and brought into another kingdom where he was raised as the son of the king and never told about his true identity. When the oracle told him he is to murder his father and marry his mother, he left his adoptiv-father which he believed was his real father so he may not harm him. On his way on another kingdom he came to a crossroad and was blocked by a coatch. Though he as passenger should have waited as it has been the custom he murdered the driver and all his companions. Inside the coach was the king of Thebia his real father, who he murdered too without knowledge of his identity. Then he rescued Thebia from the sphinx and became the king. So he married his mother without knowing what he was doing. In the end the gods were angry at Thebia and deases were spreading. Asking the seer about the source of all this he told Oedipus about the murder of his father, but Oedipus didn't believe the seer because he had done everything to prevent the prophecy from becoming true in his whole life. The story has a very sad ending: after Oedipus got the evidence presented he went crazy and blinded himself.


Interesting aspects are:
- Voldemort and Oedipus fulfilled the prophecy/oracle by trying to prevent it coming true
- yet there can argued against destiny because both men made mistakes in their trying to prevent the prophecies coming true:

- Oedipus didn't know that his adoptiv father wasn't his real father and he didn't talk with him about the prophecy in the first place so he didn't learn early enough (although he came across some hints that his "father" wasn't his real one)
- this and Oedipus constantly blocking up people who want to advise him shows that he thinks he can solve this problem all alone like he has solved the riddle of the Sphinx (but notice: while there are contests in ancient greece of riddle solving an oracle isn't an riddle and is interpreted in the community)
- he also didn't know the content of the oracle because he didn't know how to interpret an oracle at all: he took it all literally instead of metaphorically

- Voldemort didn't know the whole content of the prophecy (like Oedipus not knowing about his father) and didn't wait to learn more either
- he has also a similar arrogance, I think
- he didn't know that prophecies don't have to come true (like Dumbledore said in OotP) so he also took everything literally

but there's a similar situation with Harry too, remember Harry's "vision" of Sirius being tortured?
- by trying to help Sirius he actually caused his death (in the chain of happenings) because:

- he didn't question the reality: how the two most wanted wizards can just walk into the ministery of magic in broad daylight
- he didn't listen to Hermiony who warned him about his "people-saving-thing" which can also be regarded as some kind of arrogance
- he didn't question the dream, he took everything "literally"

Those similarities make me think that Rowling is showing mediate characters like the ancient drama:
- they have little faults which cause great problems when they get in high positions
- those faults come into play because the characters don't accept help
- they have different ways to choose and choose the wrong because they are not listening to advice or too impatient to wait to learn more (notice the crossroad as metaphor in "Rex Oedipus")
- they commit hybris (overstepping rules and customs, going to far, arrogance)

Sorry for the large post, but this was going on in my head for a while. Opinions?
I totally should have noticed the prophecies. I now feel like an idiot. Not just for not noticing, but for actually using "totally" in a scentence.

Anyway, that is interesting. In a way, then, you're saying Voldemort is a bit of a parallel to Oedepus in that they make the same mistake. Well, that mistake is Oedepus's downfall, and has been Voldy's once. Is it too much to hope that it will be again? Do you know what happens in Oedepus at Colonus by any chance, anyone? I've only read Antigone.

Quote:
Originally posted by CoeurDeLeon:
I found this on wikipedia, could this be use of Nagini?
Asclepius, the son of Apollo, learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one serpent bringing another (which Asclepius himself had fatally wounded) healing herbs. To prevent the entire human race from becoming immortal under Asclepius's care, Zeus killed him with a bolt of lightning. Asclepius' death at the hands of Zeus illustrates man's inability to challenge the natural order that separates mortal men from the gods. In honor of Asclepius, snakes were often used in healing rituals. Non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor in dormitories where the sick and injured slept. In The Library, Apollodorus claimed that Athena gave Asclepius a vial of blood from the Gorgons. Gorgon blood had magical properties: if taken from the left side of the Gorgon, it was a fatal poison; from the right side, the blood was capable of bringing the dead back to life.
Sorry if someone else posted this already.. I found it interesting. It would give Nagini some purpose
So Nagini's a symbol of immortality? I can see that. It lends credence to Dumbledore's theory that she's a horcrux, too. I think there's someone or something called Nagini in one of the Asian mythologies, too, though. I'll look it up in a bit.


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  #34  
Old March 25th, 2007, 3:30 am
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Re: HP and its relation to Greek Mythology

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Originally Posted by TENSHI View Post
Also Argus Filch is probably or quite sure named after the Argus in the Greek Mythology.
Another point I'd like to add to Argus, in the myth, Hera send him to watch Io (one of Zeus's lovers), and he acts as Hera's spy. Argus always acts as the spy, but more important, in OotP, he acts directly under Umbridge's instructions. Though the only similiarity I can find between Umbridge and Hera is that they're both seen as evil, I still think it's interesting that both Argus' work under an evil woman.


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Old March 25th, 2007, 3:26 pm
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Re: HP and its relation to Greek Mythology

Interesting parallel between Umbridge and Hera. Hera is known to kill (or try to kill) Zeus illegitimate offspring, so harm toward children is another.
As I'm looking up information, I found a connection between Hera and the centaurs:

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Originally Posted by http://library.thinkquest.org/26264/inhabitants/creatures/site002.htm
[Centaurs] come into the world because the priest Ixion dares to fall in love with the goddess Hera. Zeus punishes the priest by confusing him so that he lands in a cloud thinking it is Hera. Being enamored with the cloud that he thinks is Hera, the cloud gives birth to the Centaurs.
Not sure how it fits, but it's interesting.

However, Hera isn't really seen as "evil", and more jealous. Her husband Zeus had about 115 separate extramarital flings, though, so she did have a reason to be so jealous.


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  #36  
Old March 25th, 2007, 5:51 pm
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Re: HP and its relation to Greek Mythology

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Not sure how it fits, but it's interesting.
Hmm... I'm trying to think of something, but come up with nothing. Though it is interesting that Hera caused the creatures that carry Umbridge away...

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However, Hera isn't really seen as "evil", and more jealous. Her husband Zeus had about 115 separate extramarital flings, though, so she did have a reason to be so jealous.
True... I suppose I've just been tainted by Hercules The Legendary Journeys, heh.


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Old March 26th, 2007, 11:11 am
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Re: Merope and the Myth of Sisyphus

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Sirius as well is derived from mythology. He was the loyal hunting dog of Orion. When Artemis was tricked into killing Orion to demonstrate her archery skills (Apollo challenged her to hit that "speck out in the ocean"), she made him into a constellation. Sirius the dog was unwaveringly loyal and would never stop searching for Orion, so Artemis placed him in the heavens as well with his master. A comment on the general character of Sirius Black?

Sirius in Egyptian mythology was the most important star in the heavens- responsible for providing heat and light in the summer. Sirius represented the goddess Sothis, bringing fertility and the new year. She is also the guide to the afterlife for the pharoahs.

Sirius is the most powerful star, the most important, the most influential- the center of the super-ego and the personal identity. Sirius connects people with the stars.
Just wanted to add this to your perfect summary: Sirius is a "double star". There is a a "Sirius A", more common and usually visible, and a "Sirius B", wich can only be seen every X years (can't remember how many exactly).

I think this could be related with the fact that the character was foremerly believed to be a completely different someone from what he was later discovered to be.


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Old March 27th, 2007, 2:06 am
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Re: HP and its relation to Greek Mythology

Or Sirius' behavior depending on the situation. We have the Sirius who watches Harry and gives him care and advice, but then there is also the side of Sirius that is less "together" and less effective.

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Sirius represented the goddess Sothis, bringing fertility and the new year. She is also the guide to the afterlife for the pharoahs.
Fascinating...The connection between Sirius and the underworld is established in that Sirius is beyond the veil. But this connection to the new year is interesting. Is this a connection to the life-death-rebirth cycle? I doubt Sirius will come back to us, but Harry may see him again in some form.


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Old April 2nd, 2007, 1:03 am
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Re: HP and its relation to Greek Mythology

And if I remember correctly, the Egyptians believed that the star Sirius was the actual physical location of the Underworld. Whether this is correct or not, Sirius is definitely related somehow to the underworld, which is ruled by the god Osiris, who was killed and then brought back to life, so I agree that we will see him again in some form.


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Old April 2nd, 2007, 6:27 am
apolloscasche  Female.gif apolloscasche is offline
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Re: HP and its relation to Greek Mythology

Just rereading GoF, and thought I'd point out the maze being similiar to the maze created by Daedalus to house the Minotaur... granted the HP maze had many obstacles, however the Minotaur was a pretty nasty beast, he might equal several of the obstacles in the other maze, heh. I bet there's more similiarities, however it's been quite some time since I read the myth... Although I'm sure they are other mazes in other cultures, I would think Daedalus' maze is one of the more popular..


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