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  #61  
Old May 10th, 2005, 7:01 am
Muku_Muku  Female.gif Muku_Muku is offline
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Konbanwa Dobby san, HarryLass san, to Nemetoad san, Hajimema****e.

@Dobby san: My friends have atrocious pronunciation, as well. They say day-sue for desu, and other similar things.

@HarryLass san: You know more than I do at present, it would seem, and I initiated this thread. Would you post the songs in Nihongo please?

@Nemetoad san: The version I learned is 'toire wa doko desuka,' but benjo may be another word for bathroom. The only thing I know is that it should be ___ wa doko desuka to ask where something is.


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Last edited by Muku_Muku; May 10th, 2005 at 7:03 am.
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  #62  
Old May 10th, 2005, 7:22 am
Mahoutsukai  Undisclosed.gif Mahoutsukai is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TENSHI
Yes, your right. Itīs an anime. Itīs the opening song of Digimon Tamers, singer is Wada Kouji.

But in my dictionary itīs "komban wa" and I saw that s.o. wrote sayoonara (thought itīs the right way)

What is "'Watshi no oyagi wa baka desu". I know that yagi is "goat" and baka "stupid" and I believe Watashi is "You". So is it "You are a stupid goat?"
Hello,

Watashi means "I".

Baka does mean "stupid".

Oyaji: I think the correct spelling is oyaji. It is a term used by men to refer to their father (the corresponding word for mother would be ofukuro). It is a casual term and would be used only in informal conversation between friends. It is not derogatory but very casual and not classy.

So that sentence would translate as "My father is stupid."

Quote:
Originally Posted by malfoysferret
....Im horrible at writing in romaji, but here goes....

Hajimema****e!! Watashi wa kariforunia daigaku santa barbara de Nihongo o benkyo****eimasu. Yon nen gurai Nihongo o benkyo****andesu ga, jugyou no soba de hanashi no renshu o amari shinakatta.
Minna san, ****sumon ga arun desu... Nihongo de katta Harry Potter no hon ga hoshii!! Dareka ga, intaneto de kau uebusaito ga ****eimasuka?

amazon.co.jp

Amazon has a Japanese subsidiary which sells Japanese books.

日本の勉強頑張ってください。


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  #63  
Old May 10th, 2005, 7:31 am
Muku_Muku  Female.gif Muku_Muku is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mahoutsukai
Hello,

Watashi means "I".

Baka does mean "stupid".

Oyaji: I think the correct spelling is oyaji. It is a term used by men to refer to their father (the corresponding word for mother would be ofukuro). It is a casual term and would be used only in informal conversation between friends. It is not derogatory but very casual and not classy.

So that sentence would translate as "My father is stupid."




amazon.co.jp

Amazon has a Japanese subsidiary which sells Japanese books.

日本の勉強頑張ってください。
You are correct that it is oyaji. I think I probably typed the wrong letter the first time. I don't know whether it is only used by men to refer to their dads, though, and I use it all the time (I am most certainly not a guy). My dad taught it to me, and he goes to Japan relatively often, and spends lots of time around native speakers for work. You may be right, though. The literal translation is a bit deragatory, though.


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  #64  
Old May 10th, 2005, 7:32 am
Mahoutsukai  Undisclosed.gif Mahoutsukai is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Muku_Muku
@Nemetoad san: The version I learned is 'toire wa doko desuka,' but benjo may be another word for bathroom. The only thing I know is that it should be ___ wa doko desuka to ask where something is.

There are several different words for bathroom/restroom.

Toire is one. It comes from the work "toilet" and is spelled using katagana.

Otearai is another. This is a more elegant word. 御手洗 is the kanji.

Obenjo/benjo is another. This is a less classy and would not be used in front of people that you do not know. (there may be regional usage variation.)


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  #65  
Old May 10th, 2005, 7:38 am
Muku_Muku  Female.gif Muku_Muku is offline
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Makes sense. Arigatou Mahoutsukai san, to hajimema****e.

Oyasumi Mahoutsukai san. It is almost midnight here and I have a test tomorrow.


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  #66  
Old May 10th, 2005, 7:45 am
Mahoutsukai  Undisclosed.gif Mahoutsukai is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Muku_Muku
You are correct that it is oyaji. I think I probably typed the wrong letter the first time. I don't know whether it is only used by men to refer to their dads, though, and I use it all the time (I am most certainly not a guy). My dad taught it to me, and he goes to Japan relatively often, and spends lots of time around native speakers for work. You may be right, though. The literal translation is a bit deragatory, though.
Oh course there will also be women who use more masculine phrases.
Oyaji is primarily used by men.

I have been living in Tokyo for the last 20 years and the only women I have heard say oyaji are rebellious youth, those raised in more harsh
environments or those wanting present a street smart image.

If a man uses this to refer to his father, it is not derogatory at all. One Japanese dictionary I just checked even states that it is a term used to express familiarity/affection.

ETA:
Good luck on your test. Based on the time difference you must be on the west coast -- I was raised there as well.



Last edited by Mahoutsukai; May 10th, 2005 at 7:47 am.
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  #67  
Old May 11th, 2005, 7:01 am
Muku_Muku  Female.gif Muku_Muku is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mahoutsukai
Oh course there will also be women who use more masculine phrases.
Oyaji is primarily used by men.

I have been living in Tokyo for the last 20 years and the only women I have heard say oyaji are rebellious youth, those raised in more harsh
environments or those wanting present a street smart image.

If a man uses this to refer to his father, it is not derogatory at all. One Japanese dictionary I just checked even states that it is a term used to express familiarity/affection.

ETA:
Good luck on your test. Based on the time difference you must be on the west coast -- I was raised there as well.
I am rebellious, perhaps, but not in such a way. I don't care about being street smart. I will have to tell watashi no chichi, though, as he will find it very funny. Arigatou, though, for the clarification. I shall remember and not use it when I am in Japan.

Thanks for the luck It may or may not have helped. I think I did alright, though. English is so easy with my teacher.


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  #68  
Old May 14th, 2005, 3:23 am
Nurikabe  Undisclosed.gif Nurikabe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TENSHI
But I need help, could s.o. please translate the following sentences:

Zensokuryoku de mirai mo ima mo kake nukero

Sou boku wa ki zuitan da zutto shukudai wasureteta
Sore wa hitotsu no nazo nazo nazo "Boku wa dare nan darou?"

Suraidingu ****e surimuketa hiza itakutatte ne
Sugu tachiagaranakya chansu wa nigete yuku wakatteru sa



Yume miru koto ga subete hajimari sore ga kotae daro
Dare yori tooku e tonde miseru yo subete no asu wo tsuranuite

Chiheisen made tonde yuke hane wo moratta yuukitachi
Tsuyoku ookiku naru tame ni boku mo hashiridasou

Kikoete ita yo kaunto daun zutto mae kara
Junbi wa dekiteru sa ima sugu hajimeyou zero ni kaware!

Shinjirarenakya mabataki ****eru setsuna ni kieru yo
Kokoro no hyouteki sorasazu hashire subete no chikara butsukeyou

Zensokuryoku de mirai mo ima mo kake nukero
Remember that a song is a type of poem and translating a poem usually makes it worthless. This is not a word for a word translation because doing that wouldn't make sense.

"Run at top speed through today and future.

Yes, I realized that I've been forgetting the most important question.
The question is "Who am I?"

My knee aches because I did a sliding tuckle,
but if I don't get up and start chasing, the chance will be lost. You don't have to tell me that.

To dream is the start of everything and that gives you the answer.
I'll go farther then anybody, going farther than anybody's tomorrow.

The braves have wings to fly over the horizon.
I'll run to become strong myself.

I've been hearing the signal to start the race,
I'm ready and waiting for that to signal a go.

If you don't believe, it wil be gone in a blink.
Keep your mind on the target and run with all might.

Run at top speed through today and future."

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mahoutsukai
Oyaji is primarily used by men.
More on oyaji. You can use it affectionately to anyone old enough to be your father, has good skills or command a respect and owns a shop (or a factory). For example, someone who owns a tofu shop can be called "Tofu ya no oyaji" (ya=shop). The important point for this usage is that he has to be respected but is familiar or appears familiar to you.

When you use it on anyone who you don't respect or isn't familiar enough, oyaji is derogatory because it implies that he simply got old without doing the simple thing like working hard, to earn respects from neighbors. For example, if I saw someone older than me litter on a street, he is an "oyaji" because he is doing a stupid thing. Other examples are, someone who
*dress badly (and bald headed)
*keep making stupid jokes
*is boring
*is generally a nuisance


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  #69  
Old May 14th, 2005, 4:51 am
chronium  Male.gif chronium is offline
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anyone willing to translate a couple of online interviews and some websites? If you are just PM me and I will give you the details


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  #70  
Old May 14th, 2005, 9:28 am
Joanne May  Female.gif Joanne May is offline
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namida atsumete yozora e kaesou
yuragu koto nai ai dake baramake
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  #71  
Old May 15th, 2005, 11:57 pm
Muku_Muku  Female.gif Muku_Muku is offline
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Konnichiwa, Joanne_May san Hajimema****e. Eigo de itte kudasai. Please say it in English (translate). Arigatou!


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  #72  
Old May 16th, 2005, 12:01 pm
fllama  Female.gif fllama is offline
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Oh. My. Guh. Ok I'm what you would call semi-new and well.. this might be total sidelining (who am I kidding, it totally is), I just stumbled onto this place and I will so be using this thread. I'm in my final year of high school and my Jap is bits and pieces of just random stuff.

I once tried to say I was lazy and ended up saying "Gogo shimasu" in an exam/interview - in between holding their stomachs of laughter, my friends told me I had instead said something along the lines of "I do afternoon" ?? Ah well


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  #73  
Old May 17th, 2005, 1:27 pm
Muku_Muku  Female.gif Muku_Muku is offline
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Hajimema****e, fflama san. That's the whole purpose of this thread, so go ahead and ask any questions or practice or whatever. Your questions help us learn, especially me, since watashi wa baka desu (I am stupid), at least in Japanese.


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  #74  
Old May 27th, 2005, 4:15 pm
SyeiraSerena  Undisclosed.gif SyeiraSerena is offline
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Konnichiwa. Watashi wa namae hagiwara sumiko desu. Hajimema****e.
Hello. My name is Hagiwara Sumiko. How do you do? XD

Well, that's probably all I know for introduction. Heh. Unless I've forgotten what I've learnt. >.> Oh well.

I know that tomodachi is friend. So, how do I say "Can we make friends?" in Japanese?

Well, that'll be all for now.


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  #75  
Old May 28th, 2005, 3:11 am
Nurikabe  Undisclosed.gif Nurikabe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fllama
I once tried to say I was lazy and ended up saying "Gogo shimasu" in an exam/interview - in between holding their stomachs of laughter, my friends told me I had instead said something along the lines of "I do afternoon" ?? Ah well
It will mean "(I'll do that) in afternoon." in a conversation. You should have said "Watashi ha nonbiri-ya desu." "Nonbiri" means good natured kind of acting slowly and addition of "-ya", literally "shop" but more like "person" here, makes it a description.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Muku_Muku
Hajimema****e, fflama san. That's the whole purpose of this thread, so go ahead and ask any questions or practice or whatever. Your questions help us learn, especially me, since watashi wa baka desu (I am stupid), at least in Japanese.
Use, "Nihongo ga heta (=sloppy) desu." for that. Or if you happen to be in Osaka, try "Aho na gaijin desu." This makes everyone from Osaka laugh.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SyeiraSerena
I know that tomodachi is friend. So, how do I say "Can we make friends?" in Japanese?
"Tomodachi ni narou ne." (Let (us) become friends, okay?) should do it. If it's part of introducing yourself, try "Nakayoku ****e kudasai." (Please be friendly to (me).) "Naka" is spelled out using kanji meaning "friend" and "yoku" is just another form of "yoi" or good. "Yoroshiku onegai shimasu." meaning literally "(Thank you for) letting me join." does the trick in a formal situation. Japanese language is really simple isn't it?


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  #76  
Old May 28th, 2005, 3:47 am
fllama  Female.gif fllama is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Muku_Muku
Hajimema****e, fflama san. That's the whole purpose of this thread, so go ahead and ask any questions or practice or whatever. Your questions help us learn, especially me, since watashi wa baka desu (I am stupid), at least in Japanese.
My friends and I call each other baka heads all the time. We always wondered whether it really did mean stupid or we were just saying some non-existent insult. But I doubt your japanese is as bad as mine - when I don't know something I tend to throw around particle like they're going out of style or say something completely random.

"... kuruma o... o... oh my god"

Anywho. I've got an assignment and I have to pretend I'm a tour guide showing tourists around my city, and write out this passage/commentary of what I'd say. I'm doing ok so far, but there's about four sentences that I'm totally destroying and need desperate help with:

1. Cairns is located close to the world famous Great Barrier Reef and the Daintree Rainforest.

2. The centre of town is a five minute walk from the resort.

3. The bus will be stopping at the esplanade soon.

4. Lunch will be served after the video.


Any help/suggestions will be muchly appreciated


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Last edited by fllama; May 28th, 2005 at 3:56 am.
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  #77  
Old May 28th, 2005, 4:25 am
Muku_Muku  Female.gif Muku_Muku is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SyeiraSerena
Konnichiwa. Watashi wa namae hagiwara sumiko desu. Hajimema****e.
Hello. My name is Hagiwara Sumiko. How do you do? XD

Well, that's probably all I know for introduction. Heh. Unless I've forgotten what I've learnt. >.> Oh well.

I know that tomodachi is friend. So, how do I say "Can we make friends?" in Japanese?

Well, that'll be all for now.
Hajimema****e. Tomodachi ni narou ne.


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  #78  
Old May 28th, 2005, 3:48 pm
SyeiraSerena  Undisclosed.gif SyeiraSerena is offline
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Arigatou gozaimasu, Muku_Muku-san, Nurikabe-san.

If I want to enquire about something. How am I supposed to ask?
eg. I want to ask my friend what movie she watched yesterday.
or I want to know what is the title of a book my friend is reading.


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  #79  
Old May 31st, 2005, 5:59 am
Muku_Muku  Female.gif Muku_Muku is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SyeiraSerena
Arigatou gozaimasu, Muku_Muku-san, Nurikabe-san.

If I want to enquire about something. How am I supposed to ask?
eg. I want to ask my friend what movie she watched yesterday.
or I want to know what is the title of a book my friend is reading.
'ka' at the end of a sentence can make something a question, I believe. Also, do- is the usual beginning of a 'question word.' For instance, 'Toire wa doko desuka' is a question. Doko means where, and deseka makes it a question. Other 'question words' are dore (which one of several ones), dono (which N), dochira (which way, which one of several, which person), and docchi (informal of Dochira). I don't have enough vocabulary to ask things like that, but I think "What did you eat?" would be "Anata wa dono wo (not sure if that is there or not) tabema****aka." The answer then would be, perhaps, "Watashi wa sushi wo tabema****a." I hope this makes sense.

Please correct me if I am wrong in any of this. This is just my best guess, and I know very little on the subject.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fllama
My friends and I call each other baka heads all the time. We always wondered whether it really did mean stupid or we were just saying some non-existent insult. But I doubt your japanese is as bad as mine - when I don't know something I tend to throw around particle like they're going out of style or say something completely random.

"... kuruma o... o... oh my god"
If you are translating things like that, you know far more than I. I wish I just threw in particles...instead, I tend to switch to Latin or Spanish or German or French or Italian, or sometimes even to English I say things like "Oyasumi, meine amica" or "Ego wa pelucheux desu" Then I say things like that in my sleep, supposedly. Don't feel bad with particles


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Last edited by Muku_Muku; May 31st, 2005 at 5:54 am.
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  #80  
Old May 31st, 2005, 6:18 am
Mirielle  Female.gif Mirielle is offline
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Konnichiwa. Watashi no namae wa Mirielle desu. Minasan, hajimema****e!
Good afternoon. My name is Mirielle. How is everyone going? (I think?!)

Quote:
"What did you eat?" would be "Anata wa dono wo (not sure if that is there or not) tabema****aka." The answer then would be, perhaps, "Watashi wa sushi wo tabema****a." I hope this makes sense.
Hmm I always thought "What did you eat" would actually be '[Anata wa] nani wo tabema****aka.' I can't remember how to say this in a more casual way - would it be nani wo tabeta no??? (I remember vaguely my teacher saying "no" could be used as implying a question. Please correct me if I'm wrong here)
Plus I was always taught not to say anata, instead you should say the name of the person or even leave it out.
Kono thread wa ii desu yo! This thread is good - it's forcing me to refresh my very stale Japanese!


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