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Harry and Dumbledore: Joint Character Analysis



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  #41  
Old July 20th, 2008, 6:32 pm
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Re: Harry and Dumbledore: Joint Character Analysis

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Originally Posted by horcrux4 View Post
True enough!

Back to Harry, but still on the same topic - did Harry react at all to being told that Dumbledore loved him? It seemed to me when I read it that it went over Harry's head as he was so angry and distressed over Sirius. He certainly never looked at Dumbledore as a grandfather figure but always as the wise old professor. (I think if a headmaster of mine had told me he loved me - in a fatherly way of course - I'd have been quite shocked)
Harry was way too distraught to listen to him, but I suppose Dumbledore's words would have sunk in at some time or other I think, seeing Harry's willingness to forget everything when he meets Dumbledore's portrait after the war.

I think Harry did love Dumbledore; as early as HBP or perhaps even earlier, in DH he was angry as a child would be towards its parent, because it learnt things about the parent from elsewhere, when it should have learnt it from him.

Betrayal comes with love, and in DH I think Harry was angry, betrayed because Dumbledore had not told him, he was not angry that Dumbledore was friends with GG or about Aberforth's opinion of his brother, his anger was that Dumbledore never told him all this, and he had to hear it from a third person.

While yes, normally headmasters don't tell students that they love them, but here I think Dumbledore loved Harry and Harry looked up to Dumbledore, mainly because Dumbledore was closely connected to Harry from day one.

He was in reality Harry's guardian, who decided everything for Harry. Even after Sirius came on the scene, it was Dumbledore who called the shots.

Don't tell Harry about the Prophecy, go back to the Dursleys, when to leave the Dursleys after vacation, almost everything was Dumbledore's decision. And I think Dumbledore grew to love him, and I think Harry too, reciprocated.

And that's why some of Harry's suffering can be attributed to Dumbledore, because had Dumbledore so wished he could have done so much more.

That is the part I don't understand really, for example, leaving Harry with the Dursleys for almost 10 years without supervision, allowing them to ill treat them; if he could get a howler at exactly the right moment (in OOTP after the dementors came), then I also think he could have done a bit more; more than simply telling the Dursleys that they had not done enough after 16 years IMO.


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  #42  
Old July 20th, 2008, 7:01 pm
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Re: Harry and Dumbledore: Joint Character Analysis

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Harry was way too distraught to listen to him, but I suppose Dumbledore's words would have sunk in at some time or other I think, seeing Harry's willingness to forget everything when he meets Dumbledore's portrait after the war.
I agree Dumbledore's words would have fully sunk in later. But remember they met at Kings Cross and had that long talk before Harry met with him at the portrait. So a lot of things were cleared up for Harry (from his point of view - I think many readers were still scratching their heads with all the horocrux and hallows business, .). But too, Harry was fond of Dumbledore before that, remember his anquish at Dumbledore's death?

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I think Harry did love Dumbledore; as early as HBP or perhaps even earlier, in DH he was angry as a child would be towards its parent, because it learnt things about the parent from elsewhere, when it should have learnt it from him.
I would agree, but more as a beloved mentor in my view. But I agree that was why he was angry - especially when he found out the last bit, at the very last minute.

Quote:
Betrayal comes with love,
I would respectfully disagree with the general statement. I don't feel that anyone on the good side would have done what Dumbledore did to Harry. As it was Dumbledore only trusted that information to one other person - and even then not with full disclosure.

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I think Dumbledore grew to love him, and I think Harry too, reciprocated.
I agree they had love for one another.

Quote:
And that's why some of Harry's suffering can be attributed to Dumbledore, because had Dumbledore so wished he could have done so much more.
I would say the suffering could be attributed to Dumbledore because he caused it. I feel the 'something more' Dumbledore could have done was to have done the right thing from the beginning.

Quote:
That is the part I don't understand really, for example, leaving Harry with the Dursleys for almost 10 years without supervision, allowing them to ill treat them; if he could get a howler at exactly the right moment (in OOTP after the dementors came), then I also think he could have done a bit more; more than simply telling the Dursleys that they had not done enough after 16 years IMO.
I agree and this together with raising Harry, planning to send him to his death without telling him, were two of Dumbledore's most machiavellian plans (although I feel there were others.) He had several "can you top this" schemes.


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  #43  
Old July 22nd, 2008, 11:54 pm
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Re: Harry and Dumbledore: Joint Character Analysis

Did Dumbledore do the right thing leaving Harry with the Dursleys? Did he realize the extent to which Harry would be mistreated?

I think it was a right move. I don't think he knew how badly he would be mistreated however i believe he knew that the Dursleys would not treat him as their own child. I think he knew that the Dursleys did not tolerate magic as such, however living with the Dursleys kept Harry down to earth. He didn't become big headed or arrogant because he did not know to the full extent of his parents death and of his fame. If he did i believe his personalitly would have changed slightly....i think it did him good



Dumbledore allows Harry to grow and test his strengths while keeping a close eye on him when he comes to Hogwarts. Why did he choose to observe rather than interact?


Learning through experience. If you watch someone do something it isn't the same learning experience as if you do it yourself. Dumbledore wanted Harry to gain the experience of having to think things for himself and not relying on others to help him too much. This really helped Harry as a person and gave him the strength to do these things he did.

Dumbledore tells us he made a mistake in not sharing the Prophecy with Harry until the end of OotP. When would Harry have been ready to hear it? Would their relationship have had more time to progress if Dumbledore had told Harry the truth earlier?

I think GOF the end of that after Voldemorts return would have been useful, however even before that it would have been use to Harry so he would know what he was up against before OOTP. Although Harry was young and new to the Wizarding world, he might not have understood it as well. We saw after Harry was told of the phrophecy that he changed some of his views from wanting to do things to thinking he was only doing them because he thougt he hAD too, this could have easily reflected in Harry's choices and decisions at a much earlier age.
I do think their relationship would have had more time to progress if Dumbledore has told Harry sooner. I believe that Harry was slightly...dissapointed if you wish with Dumbledore not telling him this news much earlier than he did.

In HBP, Harry and Dumbledore spend the most time together of any book. What qualities do they find in each other that balance each other? Do they make a good team?

I think they make a good team. Dumbledore really listened to what Harry had to say, other Order members, teachers ignored and shunted away Harry's accusations of Draco and Snape and yet although Dumbledore didn't necessarily confind in Harry of what he knew he let Harry express these views of his and didn't put him down in saying he was imagining it or was wrong. The got along well, Harry was eager to hear what Dumbledore said and Dumbledore was ready and willing to tell Harry things and discuss these things with him. Even though a few times they disagreed they did not hold that against each other which was a good bond.

Should Dumbledore have broken his promise to Snape and told Harry more of the plan and the truth?

I think that is Dumbledore had told Harry more of the plan and the truth, thinsg may have changed a lot. We know Harry's distraught reaction to Dumbledore's death, it would be possible that Harry would have tried at least to stop it even more. Or looking at it another way he would have understood more, however i don't think we would have gone through the emotional rollercoaster we did.

Dumbledore tells Harry several times that he will tell him "the full story" of the ring? Would he have done so? Would he have included the truth about the stone?

I believe that in time he would have. Harry would have eventually have learnt about the Hallows, and i think the truth about it would have been important to Harry, not only trust from Dumbledore but to work out other things too. I think the thing that stopped him from doing so was his fear of Harry;s reaction. Dumbledore was ashamed of what the ring did to him, therefore he was reluctant to telling Harry the whole truth before his death. He felt bad about it and didn't want others to reflect thet way he felt about it as well.


In DH, Harry questions his relationship with Dumbledore more than any other. What does this questioning do to his feelings about Dumbledore?

I think he feels quite bitter towards Dumbledore at parts, for not telling him certain things such as his family growing up in Godrics Hollow, etc However i do think that Harry also punishes himself for not asking about Dumbledore and his past more. We see his thought son how all they discussed was him, his past present and future and he regrets that. He believed that if Dumbledore had told him these things, they would have had a closer bond. This in the book really puts Harry down and a few times makes him question his search for the Horcruxes and whether he will be sucessful or not.

Did Dumbledore ask too much of Harry? Should he have told him more of the truth?

Harry knew exactly what Dumbledore had asked him to do, he knew the extent to what he was doing and what he had to do, it was more of the lack of knowledge he has about what he was doing from Dumbledore. However is Dumbledore has told him the truth then it would have been too easy

Would Harry and Dumbledore have been friends if they had both lived?

Oh i definately think so, i think the whole experience would have made them stronger and given them a stronger bond, especially if they did it side by side. They would have learnt things from each other, about each other. Harry still looked up to Albus even at the end, even after all the htings he worried about in the seventh book.


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  #44  
Old July 31st, 2008, 7:07 pm
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Re: Harry and Dumbledore: Joint Character Analysis

Happy Bday Harry!


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  #45  
Old August 30th, 2008, 2:57 am
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Re: Harry and Dumbledore: Joint Character Analysis

I think Dumbledore was kind of a failure. He had the greatest magical chops in the universe. but he didn't do much.

In the final book he explained this as being his own fear of being corrupted by power and responsibility. Yet he wasn't shown at all trying to cooperate with ScrimGeur: he demanded complete obedience from him, didn't get it, and left the ministry to hang.

But he was very ineffective in preventing Voldemort from rising to power both times.

Even if he had reservations against facing Voldemort directly, Dumbledore could probably have singlehandedly taken out a large portion of Voldemort's followers at any given time. Many of the death eaters would have simply fled or disbanded at that point. It became obvious throughout the final 2 books the Death Eaters had a complex fear and greed dependency on Voldemort that was only sustained by the pleasure they got in inflicting that fear on others.


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Old August 30th, 2008, 6:09 am
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Re: Harry and Dumbledore: Joint Character Analysis

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I agree and this together with raising Harry, planning to send him to his death without telling him, were two of Dumbledore's most machiavellian plans (although I feel there were others.) He had several "can you top this" schemes.

Dumbledore was tempted by power, imho. He held magical power, and intellectual power, and leadership power. The fact that he turned down some types of power (the Hallows) does not mean that he turned away from all power.

In the movie Labyrinth there is a line by the Goblin King Jareth. He says:

"I ask for so little. Just fear me, love me, do as I say and I will be your slave."

Although it is from another movie the above quote goes a long way toward defining my feelings about Dumbledore.

I ask for so little---Ha! Dumbledore asks for so much throughout the course of the series. First and foremost trust without questions. There are many instances of "Dumbledore has his reasons" and "Dumbledores man through and through" throughout the series but one in particular always gets me. (I might be confusing book with movie---if so I apologize)

Take the line "You must have shown me real loyalty down there, Harry. Nothing but that could have drawn Fawkes to you." At first glance this looks and sounds like a benign statement. A testament to Harry's loyalty and courage. But it could easily be subtle manipulation. You needed help. Only I could provide it to you, and weren't you lucky that you had faith in me. Trust me. Rely on me. And you will always have my help.

To me, help should be freely given without conditions. But Dumbledore sets up early on Harry's reliance on him. In fact, by refusing to give answers to the rest of the Order (and McGonagll in particular) who else COULD Harry trust? Dumbledore actually handicaps Harry in this way.

Fear Me---How many references through out the books was it mentioned that Dumbledore was the only one Voldemort ever feared? Or how awesome the battle between he and Grindlewald was? If Voldemort--if TWO great evil wizards could not best Dumbledore in power then we should all know our place. In another way, Dumbledore instills fear into Harry and the Order, by keeping them in the dark---by making them think he is the only solution. With Harry in particular he lets Harry feel like he is losing Dumbledore's companionship and he lets Harry fear a weapon that doesn't even exist. Dumbledore wields fear to his advantage.

Love me---Beyond all the inferences throughout the books of Dumbledore being a great man there is a humble side to him. If he didn't have this humbleness, or moments of kindness (keeping Hagrid when everyone else thought he opened the chamber for instance) he'd be less Machiavellen and more evil. There is no doubt, in my mind, that he loved his family (especially his sister) a great deal. When all of that was taken away he lapped up the love from Harry. I think Dumbledore craved that familial sense of love and Harry was the closest thing he had to that--he as much says so at the end of OoTP. Dumbledore says he cared about Harry too much. It is meant to sound, again, like a compliment to Harry, when in reality by keeping Harry dependent on Dumbledore, Dumbledore got to feel loved and needed again.

Do as I say and I will be your slave. Funny how Dumbledore is in public office (the Wizengamot) and is Headmaster at Hogwarts. Two positions which he claims are in the public's best interest but puts him in charge creating bylaws for the whole wizarding community and rules for the school. With Harry, Dumbledore claims to know the answers to all Harry's questions---but Harry has to "be ready" for what will come by some sort of arbitrary set of rules that only Dumbledore is able to discern. What Dumbledore needed to remember, imho, was the prophecy was made that HARRY had the power to defeat the dark lord and perhaps it was unwise to try and control prophecies which rarely are what they seem.


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  #47  
Old August 30th, 2008, 7:23 am
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Re: Harry and Dumbledore: Joint Character Analysis

I agree. The thing about Dumbledore is that in addition to all of that, the man did have a lot of compassion for everyone. He craved it, I agree, but he could also dole it out in moments. He could be kind and gentle when it worked best for him to be so; but there was an element of truthfulness behind it, even though I felt he was pretty much scheming 24/7 (including holidays).

Too, in the end, in Kings Cross, he becomes good ol' Saint Nick, crying and sighing until we have Harry thinking 'how could I be angry at him now'? Indeed. Let me count the ways. He left you with the Dursleys, he let a professor abuse you, he maniputated you like a puppet, he lied to you, he betrayed you, he made your quest to get Voldemort harder than it had to be, he sent you to your (almost certain it is not) death...I am out of fingers. Nonetheless, Dumbledore expresses remorse, asks forgiveness and it is alls well that ends well as the story goes. And it is funny but when I re-read it, I noted Dumbledore remained extraordinarily arrogant throughout that conversation.

In the end, he left me with a pretty sour taste in my mouth. Again and again the excuse is given that he had no choice; he was fighting Voldemort and like an army General, he had to be a little machiavellian, had to make dastardly plans at times, had to behave like...Voldemort. But one of the major themes in the book was that everyone always has a choice - a chance to make a good one. But Dumbledore often made a bad one, imo.

Alexander Pope said, To err is human; to forgive is divine. To me, this was never more evident than when it came to Harry and Dumbledore. It truly did take divine forgiveness on Harry's part, imo.


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  #48  
Old August 30th, 2008, 3:14 pm
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Re: Harry and Dumbledore: Joint Character Analysis

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Originally Posted by wickedwickedboy View Post
I agree. The thing about Dumbledore is that in addition to all of that, the man did have a lot of compassion for everyone. He craved it, I agree, but he could also dole it out in moments. He could be kind and gentle when it worked best for him to be so; but there was an element of truthfulness behind it, even though I felt he was pretty much scheming 24/7 (including holidays).
I agree. Without this he would have been less cmplex and more evil. He really did have good intentions, I believe, but we all know the old saying about good intentions...


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Originally Posted by wickedwickedboy View Post
Too, in the end, in Kings Cross, he becomes good ol' Saint Nick, crying and sighing until we have Harry thinking 'how could I be angry at him now'? Indeed. Let me count the ways. He left you with the Dursleys, he let a professor abuse you, he maniputated you like a puppet, he lied to you, he betrayed you, he made your quest to get Voldemort harder than it had to be, he sent you to your (almost certain it is not) death...I am out of fingers. Nonetheless, Dumbledore expresses remorse, asks forgiveness and it is alls well that ends well as the story goes. And it is funny but when I re-read it, I noted Dumbledore remained extraordinarily arrogant throughout that conversation.
I attribute this to Dumbledore's need for love and admiration. He did what he thought he needed to do--so he's not really remorseful for that. If he had the chance I doubt he would have changed any of his actions. But Harry has always been special to Dumbledore as a person, like a child or grandson in many aspects, and while Dumbledore didn't have any regrets as to the final outcome I don't think he could bear to have Harry hold the same opinion of him as Aberforth did.

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Originally Posted by wickedwickedboy View Post
In the end, he left me with a pretty sour taste in my mouth. Again and again the excuse is given that he had no choice; he was fighting Voldemort and like an army General, he had to be a little machiavellian, had to make dastardly plans at times, had to behave like...Voldemort. But one of the major themes in the book was that everyone always has a choice - a chance to make a good one. But Dumbledore often made a bad one, imo.
Perhaps Dumbledore really did have no choice, especially toward the end. Once you make a decision you need to deal with the consequences of that decision. And you have to juggle all the other priorities as well. There were only a handfull of moments where Dumbledore could have changed a drastic decision---but there were no guarantees that those decisions would have turned out any better for Harry. We also have to remember that Dumbledore wasn't just juggling Harry's life but countless others that depended on him. Granted, I feel that that was a bed of his own making, but none the less it's easier to look at things in hindsight than making decisions in the moment. Yes, he could and should have made better choices throughout the series---but really who couldn't have?

My problem with Dumbledore, rather, is this vibe of hypocrisy I get from him.


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Old August 30th, 2008, 5:55 pm
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Re: Harry and Dumbledore: Joint Character Analysis

I suppose I'm going to be the odd man out here, but I'll go out on a limb and say that I don't feel that Dumbledore ever betrayed Harry. To me, Dumbledore's "Machiavellian" plan was all about timing. As he tells Snape, Harry must not know that he has to die until the last moment. "Otherwise, how could he have the strength to do what is necessary?" While it may shock that Dumbledore had been planning for Harry to die, you have to remember that there was no other option. For Voldemort to ever truly be gone, Harry needed to be killed by him. This is where the infamous "gleam of triumph" becomes vitally important. At this moment, Dumbledore knows that there is a very large chance that Harry can survive.

Here we might ask ourselves what would have happened if Voldemort did not take Harry's blood. Harry would not be tethered to life through Voldemort, which means he truly would have died in the forest. Would this change Harry's decision to sacrifice himself? Not at all, because he didn't know he could survive. Harry, being the selfless human he is, would have sacrificed himself to save those he loved, because he believes this is the right, necessary, and noble thing to do. He did not run away, remember, but did what was necessary to ensure the downfall of Voldemort. Now, keeping in mind Harry's death under these circumstances, what would have been the better choice for Dumbledore: to simply protect Harry, keeping him in the dark until the time is right to say, "hey, guess what, you have to die now," or to train Harry, letting him "try his strength" against Voldemort, giving him some power over the man he eventually must allow to destroy him? I believe that Harry would receive much more satisfaction fighting, knowing he was doing something to aid Voldemort's destruction, than simply sitting back, kept out of sight until the time is right. The only was for Harry to have the strength to sacrifice himself is to build the relationship between them, to allow Harry to witness the complexity, weight, and importance of his own life in conjunction with Voldemort's. Dumbledore gave Harry a choice. No one forced him to walk into the forest, defenseless, but he did it anyway. It is, as he says, the difference that allows him to walk to his death, not as a prisoner of his destiny, but empowered as the man who chooses to sacrifice himself for a noble cause.

Now, why didn't Dumbledore mention anything about Harry surviving? Because the fact that Harry meant to die made "all the difference." Harry gave the fighters at Hogwarts the same protection his mother gave him, essentially rendering Voldemort powerless. This is what Dumbledore speaks of when he says there is a good chance that if Harry returns to the living world, there is a good chance Voldemort may be finished for good. How could he not be when he has no power over those he seeks to rule?

I suppose it might help if you think of it is this way: suppose Dumbledore's character never existed and that there was no master plan, as it were, to defeat Voldemort. It would still be necessary for Harry to "die," a condition that does not depend on inclusion in Dumbledore's plan. And, if Harry knew he would survive, his sacrifice would not have had the same effect. He would not have protected both himself and his followers. To me, there is something beautifully virtuous in this action.

And so, while it is true that Dumbledore was a schemer, can it really be argued that he betrayed Harry? This is why Harry cannot be angry at Dumbledore in King's Cross. By not telling Harry everything and by giving him a choice, Dumbledore gives him a fundamental power, the kind Harry talks about in letting Ron destroy the locket Horcrux, an act of incalculable power and deepest magic.

I don't think Rowling meant for us to be angry at Dumbledore. Harry does, after all, name his son for his former headmaster. We, as readers, are meant to understand and forgive just as Harry does.


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Old November 21st, 2008, 1:24 pm
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Re: Harry and Dumbledore: Joint Character Analysis

Did Dumbledore do the right thing leaving Harry with the Dursleys? Did he realize the extent to which Harry would be mistreated?
I don't think he realised completely. I think that he thought that Petunia would take pity on Harry, as he had corresponded with Petunia before, so may have thought that he would have a sympathiser in her. He knew nothing about Vernon though, how could he? I think he did the right thing in leaving him with relatives, as relatives, on the whole, will look after one another.

Dumbledore allows Harry to grow and test his strengths while keeping a close eye on him when he comes to Hogwarts. Why did he choose to observe rather than interact?
I think that Dumbledore didn't want to be showing favouritism, while at the same time wanting to allow Harry to grow on his own- he didn't want to guide Harry into something he might not want to be.

Dumbledore tells us he made a mistake in not sharing the Prophecy with Harry until the end of OotP. When would Harry have been ready to hear it? Would their relationship have had more time to progress if Dumbledore had told Harry the truth earlier?
I think that the time was right when he told him. However had he told him earlier, Harry would have been able to plan more for it, but at the same time he may not have been able to cope with it as well as he does. It's a difficult one...Dumbledore admit's he'd underestimated Harry, but perhaps he hadn't underestimated him as badly as he thought.

In HBP, Harry and Dumbledore spend the most time together of any book. What qualities do they find in each other that balance each other? Do they make a good team?
I think that they do make a good team- Harry is a very strong Wizard for his age, and Dumbledore has a very strong wizard anyway. I think that they keep each other on the ground.

Should Dumbledore have broken his promise to Snape and told Harry more of the plan and the truth?
Never. Dumbledore wouldn't have broken a promise to Snape, it wouldn't have been right. I think that had Dumbledore actually said anything then Snape would have hated Dumbledore- and if he'd hated Dumbledore the whole plan would have gone out of the window, and the story of the final book would have been extremely different.

Dumbledore tells Harry several times that he will tell him "the full story" of the ring? Would he have done so? Would he have included the truth about the stone?
Dumbledore did tell Harry the story about the ring and the stone, albeit in a very roundabout way. Dumbledore felt that Harry still needed to grow a bit more- he sowed the seeds of the story, Harry just needed to put the pieces together.

In DH, Harry questions his relationship with Dumbledore more than any other. What does this questioning do to his feelings about Dumbledore?
I think that at times Harry really hates Dumbledore, but I think he realises that he was trying to help. His feelings about Dumbledore do change in the book, but in the end they have changed for the better...

Did Dumbledore ask too much of Harry? Should he have told him more of the truth?
I think that it wasn't that he asked too much of Harry, but it wasn't his thing to ask. He gave Harry the information and Harry had to make his own mind up. He even said that Harry could walk away and hope that someone else did it. A bit of emotional blackmail perhaps, but I don't think he asked too much.

Would Harry and Dumbledore have been friends if they had both lived?
I think that they would have a cordial relationship...Dumbledore would be the sort of person who was invited around for Christmas and things, but I don't think they would be true friends like the trio...


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  #51  
Old November 23rd, 2010, 8:29 pm
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Re: Harry and Dumbledore: Joint Character Analysis

Did Dumbledore do the right thing leaving Harry with the Dursleys? Did he realize the extent to which Harry would be mistreated?

Yes he did. He knew that they were horrible people but regardless, he knew and understood more than anyone else that there was no safer place for Harry to be than with the Dursley's. In the years he was at Hogwarts, Dumbeldore protected him on the grounds, the Dursley's over the summer holidays, if he didn't spend it with the Weasley's.

Dumbledore allows Harry to grow and test his strengths while keeping a close eye on him when he comes to Hogwarts. Why did he choose to observe rather than interact?
Because Harry still is a child trying to find his way in the world. I honestly think that Harry was too young to even comprehend everything that was going on. I honestly think that Dumbeldore tried to do his best, given the circumstances.

Dumbledore tells us he made a mistake in not sharing the Prophecy with Harry until the end of OotP. 1. When would Harry have been ready to hear it? 2. Would their relationship have had more time to progress if Dumbledore had told Harry the truth earlier?


1. I think it happened at the right time. He was fifteen/sixteen when he learns about the prophesy. I honestly think that if Dumbeldore would've told him before that, he would've acted irrationally or dived in without really thinking about it.

2. No, because Dumbeldore was always afraid of the connection between Voldemort and Harry. Dumbeldore WANTED to tell him more, but he couldn't as he was scared that Voldemort would find it all out.


In HBP, Harry and Dumbledore spend the most time together of any book. What qualities do they find in each other that balance each other? Do they make a good team?

They make a really good team, those two. Harry thinks the world of Albus and vice versa. Dumbeldore always had a way to explain things to Harry to make him see or make him understand why things need to be done a certain way.

Should Dumbledore have broken his promise to Snape and told Harry more of the plan and the truth?
No. Harry is really spur of the moment kind of guy. He never thinks before he acts. He sped off to the ministry of magic after seeing Sirius being tortured. Harry cared too much about everyone to remain rational. Harry acts on feelings.

Dumbledore tells Harry several times that he will tell him "the full story" of the ring? Would he have done so? Would he have included the truth about the stone?
I honestly think that in due time, he would've. After everything had come and gone, I honestly believe that he and Harry would've said down and tied in the loose ends.

In DH, Harry questions his relationship with Dumbledore more than any other. What does this questioning do to his feelings about Dumbledore?
I think that in the end he still loved Dumbeldore and he respected him but the pressure that Dumbeldore had set on Harry is huge for any seventeen year old.


Did Dumbledore ask too much of Harry? Should he have told him more of the truth?
I honestly think that Dumbeldore did as best as he could. No, he shouldn't have. For reasons that I have explained in questions above.


Would Harry and Dumbledore have been friends if they had both lived?
Yes, without a shadow of a doubt, they would've been friends. Too much history not to remain friends.


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  #52  
Old November 23rd, 2010, 10:11 pm
Desecrate  Undisclosed.gif Desecrate is offline
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Re: Harry and Dumbledore: Joint Character Analysis

To me Dumbledore was the parent Harry never had. Sirius was sort of like his parent but more in a best friend way. Dumbledore did the actual "parenting" role.


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Old November 24th, 2010, 9:11 pm
guanine  Undisclosed.gif guanine is offline
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Re: Harry and Dumbledore: Joint Character Analysis

Did Dumbledore do the right thing leaving Harry with the Dursleys? Did he realize the extent to which Harry would be mistreated?

Yes, considering the context of the situation. The need to protect Harry was top in Dumbledore's mind when he made the decision. He, at that time, could predict that Voldemort would grow strong again and that Harry would be in grave peril when he does, as he explained to Snape right after the Potters died. Therefore, he had to use the blood connection to protect Harry from Voldemort potentially.

Also, he desired to protect Harry from an ego that he would get from being in a wizarding family where he constantly hears about his fame and how he saved the wizarding world, etc. However, I do not think Dumbledore here really realized the extent to which the Dursleys would mistreat Harry. He probably suspected resentment toward magic, but never guessed the extent of the Dursleys' neglectful and sometimes cruel behavior. Dumbledore's anger at them in the sixth book suggests to me that this behavior was not fully anticipated by him when he made arrangements with Petunia.

Dumbledore allows Harry to grow and test his strengths while keeping a close eye on him when he comes to Hogwarts. Why did he choose to observe rather than interact?

I think this is not only characteristic of Dumbledore's relationship with Harry, but of his relationships in general (though that would be off topic). He probably believed that Harry, being as unsure of himself as he was coming into Hogwarts first year, would gain confidence from making his own choices and testing himself. Though this may be a view only taken from hindsight as this is what actually happened. But I do think that is Dumbledore's nature to watch as others test themselves and carry out his overall plans.

Dumbledore tells us he made a mistake in not sharing the Prophecy with Harry until the end of OotP. When would Harry have been ready to hear it? Would their relationship have had more time to progress if Dumbledore had told Harry the truth earlier?

Had it been told to Harry pre-Goblet of Fire I do not think it would have held as much weight. The thought of Voldemort at this time was much more foreign to Harry then. All he knew of Voldemort was a split encounter in SS, the memory of Tom Riddle, and the garbled views of others and how they related his past to him. By the end of Goblet of Fire, Harry had seen Voldemort performing Unforgivables and actually watched him order Peter to kill someone. Voldemort's presence became even more relevant in OotP with the dramatic shift in Harry's life and the death of Sirius. I am not saying that hearing the prophecy would've had no effect if revealed during Harry's first four years, but the effect wouldn't have been as strong.

As for the Dumbledore-Harry relationship progressing, their cordial relationship would've certainly progressed, but probably not their personal relationship.

In HBP, Harry and Dumbledore spend the most time together of any book. What qualities do they find in each other that balance each other? Do they make a good team?

They make an excellent team: Dumbledore plans and Harry carries out those plans. They both obviously have the same determination in defeating Voldemort, though each having their own reasons. Dumbledore is an excellent mentor figure for Harry, imo, because he perceives where Harry doesn't and is able to coax him along while still letting Harry act on his own.


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