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  #1321  
Old January 8th, 2013, 4:56 am
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Re: Rate and review the last book you read

7/10 Dreamcatcher - Stephen King
This book started out really good and it definitely had its scary moments, it really worked up to the alien invasion and all. It kept me awake at nights. It reminded me of King's other book, Desperation, where the entity took over the humans body as happened in this book as well.


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  #1322  
Old January 16th, 2013, 9:01 pm
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Re: Rate and review the last book you read

The Casual Vacancy(370 pages in)- 10/10


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  #1323  
Old January 17th, 2013, 4:43 am
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Re: Rate and review the last book you read

6/10 Where Things Come Back - John Corey Whaley
I must admit I was somewhat disappointed in this book. I was about one hundred pages in when I realized that I didn't enjoy how the main character talked about himself in the third person, was he just imagining these situations or were they really happening. It really turned me off with the book. Also when the main character would make up titles for books he would supposeably eventually weite, or not. There were three different stories going with the start of new chapters and they coincided quite well together. Basically I was just wanting to finish to find out what happened to the main character's missing brother.

7/10 The Stranger - Albert Camus

review I don't really know how I feel about this book. The main character finds himself involved in a murder after the death of his mother. This is the most peculiar of characters, he has no feelings on the death of his mother. He is tried for his crime and even here do we see him show anything at all? This book raises the question of what makes one human.


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  #1324  
Old January 18th, 2013, 8:39 am
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Re: Rate and review the last book you read

7\10 Dreamless by Josephine Angelini. (Starcrossed, #2)

Based on the ancient Greek legends of Troy and the Trojan War this book was an interesting read. I didn't expect that at all, but Angelini really made a nice story that kept me excited and attached to the book until I finished it.
Can't wait for the third book to come out!


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  #1325  
Old January 18th, 2013, 11:01 pm
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Re: Rate and review the last book you read

The Lord of the Rings - 10/10

It's even better than I remembered. No words to describe it. The only bad thing about it (apart of the weight, even reading it in the three volumes edition) is that you end up reading on the train bound for job with a blissful face that at 7 am makes you look like an idiot. And you can't start clapping when the Rohirrim ride into the Pelennor because people would think you crazy.


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  #1326  
Old January 27th, 2013, 2:45 am
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Re: Rate and review the last book you read

The Darkest Minds by Alexandra Bracken-10/10

So well written, and the story was very original. There wasn't at least one moment in which I wanted to stop reading this book. It kept me interested through the whole thing.


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  #1327  
Old January 29th, 2013, 4:12 am
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Re: Rate and review the last book you read

9/10 The Snow Child
I simply loved this book and I think it being set in the Alaskan wilderness played a big part in it. Jack and Mabel never had a famy of their own and moved to Alaska to live off the land. One night after the snow fell they build a child from the snow, the one thing they've always longed for. One day a child appears from out of nowhere, and as she reappears now and then, Jack and Mabel grow fond of her. But as everyone knows, good things come and go...
Such a beautiful story, with love, yearning, and heartache. The only tidbit I didn't like, is when they talk to Faina (the snow child), they never talk in quotations, so it almost seems as if she isn't real.


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  #1328  
Old January 30th, 2013, 11:15 am
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Re: Rate and review the last book you read

The Selection by Kiera Cass

Spoiler: show
What Fifty Shades is to Twilight, The Selection is to The Hunger Games, although there are major differences. Where Fifty Shades is a dull, self-indulgent, plotless, dirge of 1500 pages, The Selection is not. It’s a short snappy novel that doesn’t outstay its welcome. It benefits from a simple story and good editing. Rather than being padded, the novel leaves the reader wanting to know more, and it’s a good hook for a sequel, which is forthcoming (“The Elite” in March).

The plot is intriguing. The story is set in the distant future where the United States, bankrupted with debt was invaded and conquered by China, who turned it into a puppet state. Eventually a revolution occurred and the “American State of China” was replaced with a kingdom named Illea, ruled by a royal family. The royal family has a unique way of choosing its heirs. Princesses are sent abroad, to marry foreign leaders, in order to build alliances to protect Illea, which is under constant threat of attack. Princes remain in Illea to reign as kings. They choose their queens via a process called the Selection

When a prince comes of age, every girl in Illea between the ages of 16 and 20 is invited to enter their names into the contest. Thirty-five of them are chosen for the Selection, where they are taken to the royal palace in Angeles, the capital of Illea, to spend time with the prince, until he chooses one to be his wife and future queen. In return for generous financial reward, the girls must adhere to a number of strict rules and regulations. They must be in good health. They must be virgins. They cannot sabotage or mistreat any of the other girls at the palace, and crucially in the case of the lead character in this story, America Singer, they must not pursue any romantic relationship with any other person during their stay with Prince Maxon, the heir to the throne of Illea in this novella.

Illea is also organised along a strict caste system with “Ones” at the top and “Eights” at the bottom. Your caste determines your career, social and financial status. Girls from lower castes who make the final thirty-five are upgraded. If they make the final cut (known as Elites), they are upgraded even further. The girl chosen by the prince is upgraded to the highest caste along with her entire family, who become official part of the royal family. For girls from poorer castes, the incentive to enter the Selection is obvious. Young men who reach the age of 19 are eligible for the draft into Illea’s army, a virtual death sentence to those sent abroad to fight Illea’s many enemies.

There are elements from The Hunger Games in here, especially with the personal stylists that prepare the girls for appearances on Illea’s television programing, but it’s justified here given the nature of the story, in that the Selected are being prepared to meet royalty and must appear regal as practice for what could be their future role in life. The character of Gavril, the interviews he conducts and the weekly show he hosts on Illea state television is similar to the character of Ceaser Flickerman in The Hunger Games, but it’s a relatively minor quibble. Although the caste system is unfair and has traits of The Hunger Games’ district system in it, Illea is a better country than Panem, lacking sadism and outright cruelty.

Traits of Edward and Bella are also present in America Singer (the lead character) and Prince Maxon, but again, only slightly. Both characters are superior to those in Twilight. They come across as friendlier, deeper and less superficial. America has interests, conflicted thoughts and a sense of responsibility. She does seem a little fixated on being married and having children but it honestly comes across as a conscience decision that she is making, rather than any silly and unrealistic infatuation. Whereas Bella Swan is self-centred, America Singer is constantly thinking of others, and intent on helping them, whether it be her own family, or lower castes in general. She’s a likable lead character. Maxon is also friendly and means well, even if he’s a little socially awkward, which is to be expected given his upbringing, but thankfully, he lacks Edward Cullen’s threatening and controlling ways. He’s clearly inspired by Chris Pine’s character in the second Princess Diaries film, and that’s not necessarily a bad thing. He also makes an honest effort to improve conditions in Illea once he discovers from America how much the poorer castes suffer. When he realises that the potential princesses were covertly told, during their application process, that they should surrender to his every sexual demand and desire to improve their chances of being chosen, he is horrified and makes certain that they know that this is certainly not the case. Other characters such as America’s family, many of the other Selected girls, King Clarkson and Queen Amberly are also depicted as quite friendly and amiable.

Cass spends most of the novel establishing the relationship between America and Maxon, and its time well spent. They have a friendly relationship which seems to flow naturally. Aside from a few rebel attacks, nothing much happens in this book in terms of major actions. It’s mainly a character building piece, and that’s perfectly fine. The author does a solid job of it. Most of the entire book is spent at the royal palace, but this simple approach pays off, as it allows the reader to focus on the central character relationships, and doesn’t try to dazzle them with padding (of which, virtually none exists in this book).

The central dilemma for the lead character (she’s been chosen as a potential wife for the prince of Illea, but is in love with Aspen, a boy from her home province Carolina who is of a lower caste than her own), is well handled. It is a little contrived when Aspen is drafted into the military and assigned to be a palace guard, with the job of personally guarding America, but contrivance is fine if it aides storytelling, and in this case it does. Aspen is, for long periods of the middle part of the novel, missing from the storyline, other than being mentioned in America’s inner monologue (like Twilight, The Hunger Games and Fifty Shades, this novel is told in the first person), but it does give his reappearance later in the story more of an impact. Like America and Maxon, Aspen is also given depth. He clearly loves America, but shows selflessness by encouraging her to enter the Selection in the first instance, as he feels that it would bring her a better life than he could ever provide for her, but he does it at great personal anguish.

What Kiera Cass grasps, that Stephenie Meyer and Suzanne Collins didn’t, is that if the central plot of a novel is a love triangle, you really need to keep both potential choices fairly balanced. Cass does that well with Maxon and Aspen. Each has their attributes, and each would make a good partner for America, but for different reasons. In Twilight, it was never in doubt that Bella would choose Edward, and Jacob was deliberately handicapped by Meyer to make him less appealing to Bella than Edward, the author’s preferred choice. The same applied to Peeta and Gale in The Hunger Games. By keeping the options open, Cass creates more drama. The novel ends with only six girls remaining, including Celeste, America’s most ultra-competitive and ruthless rival. America is yet to decide who she wants, Maxon or Aspen, or indeed whether she wants either of them at all. The author has ensured that any decision would be equally justified. The time spent on balancing the two potential suitors pays off in this cliffhanger ending.

Overall, I enjoyed and recommend this book, and look forward to reading the sequel.


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  #1329  
Old February 1st, 2013, 12:02 am
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Re: Rate and review the last book you read

Mistborn: Alloy of Law by Brandon Sanderson

9 out of 10 -- good read, as is the trilogy that comes before it. Only complaint is that characters feel like they have character sheets lurking just beneath the surface sometimes.


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  #1330  
Old February 6th, 2013, 1:21 am
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Re: Rate and review the last book you read

One Shot A Jack Reacher Novel by Lee Child

First off, Reacher is awesome, he can both beat you up and outsmart you. I liked this book because it kept me geussing as too how the crime went down, and although I knew pretty early on who the bad guys were, the way you kept finding out more and more about the group, who they were and what they did, was great.

8.5/10


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  #1331  
Old February 10th, 2013, 4:07 am
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Re: Rate and review the last book you read

The Lost Prince by Julie Kagawa, 7.5/10

I enjoyed it, but it didn't live up to my expectations. I really loved the Iron Fey series, so I had high hopes that this new adventure would be just as exciting. Unfortunately, it felt like it was missing a little something. I didn't particularly like the girl main character, but she eventually grew on me. I really liked Ethan, and it made me want to go back and re-read The Iron Kingto when he was a little boy.


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  #1332  
Old February 10th, 2013, 6:38 am
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Re: Rate and review the last book you read

The God Delusion - 9/10

Richard Dawkins was, surprisingly, a much more engaging writer than I thought he would be. I read this book mostly in the half hour or so before I went to bed, a time of the day when I usually can't remember anything the next morning, let along stay up long enough to read more than a page or two, but I could read ten, twelve pages at a time reading this book; I couldn't put it down.

I especially found the last four chapters to be fantastically interesting, so much so that I started taking the book to work to read it over my lunch breaks.

The Panther by Nelson DeMille - 8/10

I've been a fan of Nelson DeMille since I was 13 and read Plum Island for the first time. The Panther is the latest in DeMille's John Corey series which, happily, marries John Corey's character with Paul Brenner's character (from The General's Daughter fame). It's this marriage which bumps this book from a middle of the road enjoyable fiction for the masses 7.5/10 as I always wanted to know how John and Paul would get along. This book provides the answer.

The basic plot of the book is that John and his wife are sent to Yemen on a manhunt for an American-born Al-Qaeda leader dubbed the Panther. It deals a lot with John and his wife's encounter with another terrorist, Asad Khalil, aka The Lion from the book The Lion's Game, and the fall out from the intermediate books Nightfall and... Wildfire, I believe, and John and Kate's relationship with the CIA.

What I'm finding incredibly interesting now (without getting political, it's just a massive coincidence that this is coming up right as I read this book) is that The Panther deals a lot with drones and a bit of the ethical conundrums of using drones to kill Americans since the Panther (Bulus Ibn al-Darwish by name) is a born and raised American citizen and, prior to very recent events, protected by his right to due process from being blasted with a hellfire missile from a drone. Interesting timeliness that this book was released.

Also interestingly, right after I finished the book I ended up watching a show on the National Geographic Channel about a famous Yemeni ruin called the Bilqis ruins, or at least that's what they were called in the book.

Anyway, the book itself was pretty typical John Corey smart-alekness, only this time it's smart-alekness in the context of the Yemeni culture instead of New York City or, barring that, upstate New York or Long Island.


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  #1333  
Old February 14th, 2013, 8:54 pm
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Re: Rate and review the last book you read

Persuasion - 10/10

My e-book had an accident last week, so I came back to one of my classic bag-metro-train books while I have it mended. It was as lovely as always, or even more. Not as wildly funny as Pride and Prejudice, perhaps; but equally sharp and definitively more tender. As a small concession to Valentine's day, I left the letter scene for today.


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  #1334  
Old February 16th, 2013, 5:19 pm
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Re: Rate and review the last book you read

Just read "The Giver" by Lois Lowry again. Hadn't read it in years. I'm surprised at how well it holds up. 10/10 -- though if you read it do keep in mind it's a children's book.

Back cover blurb:
Quote:
Jonas's world is perfect. Everything is under control. There is no war of fear or pain. There are no choices. Every person is assigned a role in the Community.

When Jonas turns twelve, he is singled out to receive special training from The Giver. The Giver alone holds the memories of the true pain and pleasure of life. Now it's time for Jonas to receive the truth. There is no turning back.


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  #1335  
Old February 17th, 2013, 3:50 pm
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Re: Rate and review the last book you read

Wicked by Gregory Maguire 6/10.

This book was a bit strange. I liked the political allegory, I liked Elphaba's character and most of the plot but I don't understand exactly what the author was trying to make me ponder over. It says on the back cover that it's supposed to be a story which challenges the notions people have about good and evil and while it certainly paints the Wizard of Oz in an unflattering color, I really can't see what sort of notions of good and evil Elphaba challenges. Nothing she did was immoral, besides her sleeping with a maried man and attempting to kill a school teacher. She was supposed to be this radical terrorist which tries to overthrow the oppressive wizard but the author shows us none of this. Elphaba seems to be all talk and no walk and the author skips important aspects of her life in order to narrate less important ones. How she became a witch for example is covered only briefly while the author devotes many pages to her sitting around and chatting with the wife of her lover, hoping to earn her forgiveness (a plot point which lead nowhere). I don't know, it just felt like I was reading, say, a version of Harry Potter where Rowling tells us little about Harry's battle against Voldemort but a lot about Harry's interactions with the Dursleys. I felt like I missed something.


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  #1336  
Old February 19th, 2013, 9:21 am
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Re: Rate and review the last book you read

Warm Bodies - 8/10

Good read, intriguing style, but I can't help thinking that the novel could have been more.


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  #1337  
Old February 19th, 2013, 6:19 pm
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Re: Rate and review the last book you read

Divergent by Veronica Roth 8.5/10


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  #1338  
Old February 19th, 2013, 8:57 pm
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Re: Rate and review the last book you read

An Abundance of Katherines by John Green
8/10

I liked this one. I find that I enjoy most of John Green's characters. They're always a little off/different/other-ish but always endearing. While I thought the plot was a tad predictable (it is a YA novel after all) I still enjoyed watching it unfold. A quick, fun read.

Quote:
Originally Posted by xhanax315 View Post
6/10 Where Things Come Back - John Corey Whaley
I must admit I was somewhat disappointed in this book. I was about one hundred pages in when I realized that I didn't enjoy how the main character talked about himself in the third person, was he just imagining these situations or were they really happening. It really turned me off with the book. Also when the main character would make up titles for books he would supposeably eventually weite, or not. There were three different stories going with the start of new chapters and they coincided quite well together. Basically I was just wanting to finish to find out what happened to the main character's missing brother.
Thank you! I read this on a recommendation that it was 'better than a John Green book'. I kept reading to see where it was going to get to the point where I loved it, and that point never came. I only finished it to see how the 'disappearance' would resolve.


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  #1339  
Old February 23rd, 2013, 10:04 am
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Re: Rate and review the last book you read

The Casual Vacancy, JK Rowling - 4.5/5. Here's my review (copied over from Goodreads):

This books started really slow and it wasn't until the very end that I realised why: the death of Barry Fairbrother was a suspended moment in time which triggered the development and change in the community and in the characters that the whole book is about. In my view, it was supposed to be a moment where all movement, all action has stopped and everyone is holding their breath before the chaotic, inscrutable, reckless plunge they're going to get as a result. On reflection, even the wordiness of the first [art serves that purpose by showing the state of Pagford and its citizens in minute detail. So while I did hold it against the novel for a while, I don't think so now that I've finished it: it makes perfect sense within the entire frame of the narrative's development.

I feel like the speed of events has been meticulously calculated despite superficial appearances, because the narrative took up speed in a steady manner, reaching a very satisfying climax at the end, not only in terms of resolution, but also characterisation. So while at the beginning I had some trouble going back into the story and remembering who was who, by the middle I couldn't wait to go back to the book in the evenings.

It's not just the narrative pace that changes gradually with the advance of the book, character development is also carefully calculated. I loved that Rowling allowed her characters some humanity only at the very end of the book, after having treated them ruthlessly for 400+ pages, assigning them terrible motives and damning inner monologues, exposing the ugly lying so close to the surface under the harsh, unforgiving light of her prose. This, too, annoyed me at the beginning - why does she loathe her characters so much? Why doesn't she allow them a tiny grain of compassion? It was a bit difficult for some time, reading about people you have no choice but to hate, because you just have no window into anything that makes them even slightly relatable, not a single excuse offered for their slimy actions and thoughts, no rationalisation, only unadulterated judgement. But that made it all the more gratifying when towards the end of the novel, right before the resolution, we finally get a glimpse of the human, the vulnerable, the honest part of the characters we're well acquainted with at that point, and are finally free give out our forgiveness - or withhold it. This is carefully constructed through not only changes to speech and thought patterns but also a move from overwrought physical descriptions to a focus on their emotional state; from using stereotypical qualities/acts and manipulating the reader's anticipation for what they mean for the character to adding more and more nuance in the form of idiosyncrasies where they would not be expected; from detailed accounts of nasty acts and intentions to allotting more space to the backstories and motives behind them. It's like slowly unveiling the entire picture of which we'd only been shown a part before: much like in the story itself, the truth is gradually revealed in the characters' inner lives as well.

The social commentary, which is the whole point of the book, was rather obvious, but no less impactful for that reason, at least for me. It's not so easy to see the fine links between personal philosophies, informed either by selfishness or compassion, and the efficiency of institutions in real life, and The Casual Vacancy makes them quite clear. While some of the conclusions could have been more subtly put across, the novel still makes for a resounding political message, and I liked that very much, because it's a message right up my ideological alley.

Also, I cried at a couple of places. This is good writing. Not super refined or especially moving, not award-winning quality, but powerful nonetheless. So in summary, it's good writing, a great story, an insightful portrayal of how a community is made or broken, and some masterful characterisations.

I knocked off half a point because of some minor annoyances over style.


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  #1340  
Old February 25th, 2013, 8:08 am
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Re: Rate and review the last book you read

The Greatcoat - Helen Dunmore:-

Beautifully written, it transports the reader back to Yorkshire after the Second World War. A young couple move into a rented flat. She is cold and finds a huge RAF greatcoat in a cupboard. She puts it on the bed to keep her warm at night and there are consequences......

A ghost story, but not a frightening one.

I have to give this 9.5/10 - it is the best book i have read in ages...


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