Login  
 
 
Go Back   Chamber of Secrets > Harry Potter > The Stone > Legilimency Studies

Grindelwald: Character Analysis



Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #21  
Old November 24th, 2007, 1:40 am
DeathlyH's Avatar
DeathlyH  Male.gif DeathlyH is offline
Defender of Dogs
 
Joined: 4679 days
Location: In a dream
Posts: 2,129
Re: Grindelwald: Character Analysis

What did you think of him?
At first, I didn't like him. He was definately not a guy to mess with. I thought when he was a kid, he used Albus to help get his plans carried out. Gellert luckily arrived right at the (then) worst time in Dumbledore's life, so he could manipulate him and have him think he was doing the right thing by dominating Muggles. Basically, he took a weak, battered person who was forced to look after his troubled siblings and gave him a chance at freedom and power. I hated Grindelwald for that. I didn't think too highly at first, but I changed that opinion slightly when he stood up to Voldemort. Even though he knew he would instantly be killed if he refused, which he was, he still felt a little remorse and (indirectly) protected Harry.

What did you make of his and Dumbledore's blossoming friendship?
It honestly scared me a bit. The fact that Dumbledore, perfect, wise, flawless Dumbledore ever was a friend of a Dark Wizard and tried to dominate Muggles with him. It made me wonder if all that really seemed to happen during the first six books was just a fluke, and all that time Dumbledore had been leading Harry towards his doom. I thought Dumbledore might have been evil, and that mysterious gleam of triumph backed that up. Of their friendship, as I stated above, Albus was in a terrible period then and Gellert got through to him. Dumbledore was so lonely at that point in his life, he would have taken Voldemort for a friend if he had been around. The fact that he went along with Grindelwald's plans even while he knew Grindelwald was evil really tells me that their friendship was never real, and it was just there to make Grindelwald happy with his plans, and give Albus a friend, no matter how cruel.

For the greater good- did they have a point?
They must have had a point. I think the thing Albus said that stands out the most to me is "So what if one small girl got neglected?" This, I believe, was the main point in the greater good's argument. No matter what you do to something, there will always be casualties. Grindelwald and Dumbledore wanted to overthrow the Statue of Secrecy, and there was no way they could do that without displeasing someone, like Ariana. I think the thing that really made Dumbledore turn back from the plan was the fact that it was his own sister Grindelwald was ignoring, and not some random person. Aberforth pointed this out to him, and Dumbledore finally admitted defeat. Dumbledore couldn't bear to have his own sister miserable even if he was in power, so he turned away from Grindelwald. The greater good was, unfortunately, inevitable, but yes, Grindelwald had the incorrect way of thinking about it.

Did the fact he was prepared to die rather than betray the wand's whereabouts redeem him?
He certainly showed me that there was a bit of good in him, pretty deep down, but all the terrible things he had previously done were too much and could not be canceled out. I think that he finally realized all the terrible things he had done, and tried to do during his friendship with Dumbledore and wanted to repay him by protecting him. Of course, he knew where the wand was, so he tried his best to keep it away from Voldemort and make Dumbledore happy. The fact that Voldemort still got the wand from Dumbledore's tomb doesn't matter to Grindelwald's character. As long as he tried to protect it, even though he knew he would die, proved that he felt some pity, and for that, I am glad. I knew that it was in there, and I want to see the best of all characters (except Snape, maybe. I hate Snape.) So Grindelwald will never be fully redeemed for killing Muggles, definately not, but the fact he showed remorse improves his character greatly in my eyes.


Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #22  
Old December 13th, 2007, 11:16 pm
YellowPoofBall's Avatar
YellowPoofBall  Undisclosed.gif YellowPoofBall is offline
Fifth Year
 
Joined: 4623 days
Posts: 905
Re: Grindelwald: Character Analysis

Rereading the part of DH where Grindelwald steals the Elder Wand makes me think differently about him, along with the part where he sacrifices himself rather than divulge what he knows about the wand. He only stunned Gregorovitch instead of killing him. He must have researched pretty well to have known that stunning would work instead of killing too. But I think that his refusal to tell Voldemort about the wand and the way he stunned instead of killed showed that he was interested in the greater good, and not merely his own selfish wants.


__________________
Boioioioioioinggggg
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old October 4th, 2008, 3:50 pm
MrSleepyHead's Avatar
MrSleepyHead  Male.gif MrSleepyHead is offline
Snidget of Champions
 
Joined: 5282 days
Location: Hoggy Warty Hogwarts
Posts: 3,158
Re: Grindelwald: Character Analysis

Did the fact he was prepared to die rather than betray the wand's whereabouts redeem him?
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeathlyH
The fact he showed remorse improves his character greatly in my eyes.
I will focus on this question and what DeathlyH introduced.
DH, The Ghoul in Pajamas, Ch. 6, Page 103, American, HB"Isn't there any way of putting yourself back together?" Ron asked.
"Yes," said Hermione with a hollow smile, "but it would be excruciatingly painful."
"Why? How do you do it?" asked Harry.
"Remorse," said Hermione. "You've got to really feel what you've done."

After reading this, I suspect Grindelwald may have created a Horcrux (in the singular). In Nurmengard, he was an "emaciated figure...[with] eyes opening in a skull of a face...The frail man sat up, great sunken eyes fixed upon...Voldemort..."

He then says, "Kill me, then, Voldemort, I welcome death!" In his actions, many also believe (including Dumbledore) he showed remorse for his past. I believe it a possibility that Grindelwald wanted to die, but was unable to while his Horcrux existed. Thus, the remorse he felt at the end of his life (which was genuine, I believe), would have "pieced him back together," allowing Voldemort to truly kill him.


__________________


A Place to Gather Post-Closing: Please check out the unofficial CoS Students LiveJournal page to keep in touch with CoS members after the forums close: http://cos-students.livejournal.com
WalnutFirebolt138
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old October 4th, 2008, 4:53 pm
vampiricduck's Avatar
vampiricduck  Female.gif vampiricduck is offline
Qvack...
 
Joined: 5255 days
Location: Cork, Ireland
Age: 29
Posts: 3,271
Re: Grindelwald: Character Analysis

What did you think of him?

At first, he entirely confused me. I wasn't sure what to think or him or who he was- and I had certainly never expected the name from the back of a Chocolate Frog card to be so implicit in furthering our understanding of the Hallows. I came to understand though, that he perhaps was more misled and curious than overall bad.

What did you make to his and Dumbledore's blossoming friendship?

I actually had my theory that they were genuinely in love with one another. And their idea in the Wizarding World wasn't exactly contrary to ideas that have been used in the muggle world by people looking for the greater good- they're not good ideas, for sure, but they are still there, so ideas like those are bound to draw people together in some small way or another. I think the story of how they separated and fell apart is one of the saddest in the books, and I think it was a source of perennial hurt for the two of them, and not just for Dumbledore.

For the greater good - did they have a point (albeit not going about the right way)?

Anything for the Greater Good likely should have a point, but the "greater good" is relative to a situation that we don't all share- and so any attempts to instill anything to create the greater good is likely not going to work to everyone's advantage. Sadly, some people's greater goods are often the result of personal pain or contusion, followed by attempts to overtake, harm and injure. They had a point, but Dumbledore simply wanted someone great to understand him. Grindelwald was, without doubt, a wonderfully talented individual who had delusions of grandeur and thought he could overtake the world. I feel pity for him in some ways, but his methods and thoughts were definitely too dark to be granted access.

Did the fact he was prepared to die rather than betray the wand's whereabouts redeem him?

In my opinion, yes it did. He had obviously had adequate time to rethink his position and he also probably had adequate time to reconsider his life and times. And for the first time ever, he saw what his message of "The Greater Good" could achieve- and I think it terrified him, so he would not grant that access to Voldemort. He died for what he did, as, IMO, was fitting for someone who fell off the wagon but needed redemption, and his ability to show remorse, I agree here with DeathlyH, sewed him back together so he could face death in his own way. He no longer had to fear what he had done- after spending 53 years in a cell, he had clearly rethought his positions on many things.


__________________

THE DUCK.

Avatar comes from bluebison.net
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old March 29th, 2010, 8:46 pm
persian85033  Female.gif persian85033 is offline
Third Year
 
Joined: 5885 days
Age: 32
Posts: 363
Re: Grindelwald: Character Analysis

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrSleepyHead View Post
Did the fact he was prepared to die rather than betray the wand's whereabouts redeem him?

I will focus on this question and what DeathlyH introduced.
DH, The Ghoul in Pajamas, Ch. 6, Page 103, American, HB"Isn't there any way of putting yourself back together?" Ron asked.
"Yes," said Hermione with a hollow smile, "but it would be excruciatingly painful."
"Why? How do you do it?" asked Harry.
"Remorse," said Hermione. "You've got to really feel what you've done."

After reading this, I suspect Grindelwald may have created a Horcrux (in the singular). In Nurmengard, he was an "emaciated figure...[with] eyes opening in a skull of a face...The frail man sat up, great sunken eyes fixed upon...Voldemort..."

He then says, "Kill me, then, Voldemort, I welcome death!" In his actions, many also believe (including Dumbledore) he showed remorse for his past. I believe it a possibility that Grindelwald wanted to die, but was unable to while his Horcrux existed. Thus, the remorse he felt at the end of his life (which was genuine, I believe), would have "pieced him back together," allowing Voldemort to truly kill him.
I don't think he made a Horcrux. He was looking for the Hallows, wasn't he? And I do think he showed remorse. He was much much wiser than Voldemort ever was. True, he was a Dark wizard. I can't really explain it, but kind of likke, that he was more human than Voldemort. I wonder if Dumbledore ever saw him at that prison. I doubt it, but it would have been neat to have seen more of him.


Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old March 30th, 2010, 4:14 am
Slartibartfast's Avatar
Slartibartfast  Female.gif Slartibartfast is offline
Fifth Year
 
Joined: 3589 days
Location: Magrathea
Age: 38
Posts: 971
Re: Grindelwald: Character Analysis

What did you think of him?
Mixed feelings here. To be honest, i can see his point. Muggles and Wizards never had a really rosy relationship and Grindelwald wanted to do something about it. I think it did go horribly wrong and he grew power hungry and this led to him becoming a Dark Wizard. His ideals became warped a bit by the power he had.

What did you make to his and Dumbledore's blossoming friendship?
I thought it very interesting. It shows Dumbledore had similar ambitions. These two had the same ideals and wished to act upon them. I see this as realistic in the sense that even the best of us have ideas that are not considered lovely by all.

For the greater good - did they have a point (albeit not going about the right way)?
See my answer to question one. Yes they did have a point and good one. I could only imagine living in a world thats actually rather constrictive and hiding away from muggles and everything, would be very taxing. One cannot freely express one's self in a world like that. I think Dumbledore eventually realized that using force to do this was not the way to go. He chose to work on muggle rights and realizing muggle ignorance is just natural. Grindelwald did not realize this.

Did the fact he was prepared to die rather than betray the wand's whereabouts redeem him?
Good question. I havent really thought about that before. Thing was, he was a Quester. The Hallows was more or less a great secret. I believe Grindelwald realized this during his time in Nurmengard (and perhaps he realized how foolish he was), and didnt want Voldemort to know about the Hallows at all. One could only imagine what sort of combination of Horcruxes and Hallows would make. (Note: I do not believe Grindelwald knew about the horcruxes at all.) But a very powerful dark wizard like Voldy having access to the Hallows could initially spell bad news. Grindelwald stood by his Quest to the end.


__________________


Pottermore: PatronusBat
Please do not add me on Pottermore without owling me first! Or else my wand will speak for me!
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old March 30th, 2010, 7:53 pm
persian85033  Female.gif persian85033 is offline
Third Year
 
Joined: 5885 days
Age: 32
Posts: 363
Re: Grindelwald: Character Analysis

He did tell Voldemort there was so much he didn't know or understand. Was he simply referring to the Hallows? Or maybe despite the fact that he was a Dark wizard, he, unlike Voldemort, understood love?


Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old May 27th, 2010, 2:42 am
Andvari  Female.gif Andvari is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 3623 days
Age: 29
Posts: 8
Re: Grindelwald: Character Analysis

What did you think of him? As a character, I really, really like him. He was a crafty, manipulative, powerful man, and I hope that someday JKR will release more information about him. I'd definitely love to learn more about the man who captivated Dumbledore. As a person, however, he's awful. But that's a no-brainer.
What did you make to his and Dumbledore's blossoming friendship? I think that Dumbledore had feelings for him - and how could he resist? Grindelwald was beautiful and smart; one of (if not the only) person the young genius Dumbledore could relate to. I think Grindelwald knew how Dumbledore felt and used his looks, intellect and charm to lure Dumbledore in. Grindelwald possibly manipulated Dumbledore into agreeing with some of his more violent/radical ideas, but I don't think Dumbledore was innocent either.
For the greater good - did they have a point (albeit not going about the right way)? I'll leave it at a simple "no".
Did the fact he was prepared to die rather than betray the wand's whereabouts redeem him? No, but I do think that it might hint that Grindelwald felt some sense of loyalty or duty towards Dumbledore (or at least to the Elder Wand). Perhaps they made some sort of promise to each other - that they would never reveal the wand's location. Or perhaps he just didn't want to see Voldemort triumph - if Grindelwald's attempt at world domination failed, perhaps he felt as though no one else should be able to. One of those "if I can't have it, neither can anyone else" situations. Who knows! Like I said before, I'd like JKR to expand on the subject of Grindelwald.


__________________

NettleSun56
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old June 10th, 2010, 10:35 pm
AldeberanBlack  Male.gif AldeberanBlack is offline
Secret Chocolate Keeper
 
Joined: 3753 days
Location: London
Posts: 6,178
Re: Grindelwald: Character Analysis

He was a very interesting character.

He was, along with Dumbledore and Harry, the only character who recognised Voldemort as being rather comical in nature than actually fearsome, and it's the reason why I consider Grindelwald to be a superior Dark Wizard than Voldemort, because Voldemort simply didn't know enough about magic to be regarded as #1


__________________
The Noble and Most Ancient House of Black
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old June 10th, 2010, 11:22 pm
NargleNonsense  Female.gif NargleNonsense is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 3479 days
Location: Funkytown
Posts: 54
Re: Grindelwald: Character Analysis

What did you think of him?
I never really got a good taste of his character. He seems a very explosive person, very intelligent, and also a lot more human that Voldemort. The fact that he and Dumbledore had a connection showed that there was a possibility for some remorse. He didn't give up his position and tried to save his friend.

What did you make to his and Dumbledore's blossoming friendship?
It almost seems as though it comes from a fanfiction. They're opposites in theory, but they must've come together in their obsession with the Hallows and their intelligence. I mean, I don't recall JKR ever saying that Grindelwald loved Dumbledore back. I have this quote from JKR on Snitchseeker.com.

Quote:
JKR: [re: Grindelwald] I think he was a user and a narcissist and I think someone like that would use it, would use the infatuation. I don't think that he would reciprocate in that way, although he would be as dazzled by Dumbledore as Dumbledore was by him, because he would see in Dumbledore, 'My God, I never knew there was someone as brilliant as me, as talented as me, as powerful as me. Together, we are unstoppable!' So I think he would take anything from Dumbledore to have him on his side.
This sounds as though he was using Dumbledore's love to his advantage, and he never really loved him back. It's rather sad that this is how JKR portrays it, but I think later he remembers what he had with Dumbledore and regrets using him and refuses ot give into Voldemort.

For the greater good - did they have a point (albeit not going about the right way)?
Unfortunately, I do see some merit in what they were thinking. Dumbedore, I think, was was talked into this thought before he really took charge with it. I think he wanted to help the Muggles in the long run, while Grindewald just wanted to stop hiding. That was a major difference. (Or I just tell myself this because I went through a whole 'I hate Dumbldore' phase after DH)

Did the fact he was prepared to die rather than betray the wand's whereabouts redeem him?
A little. Not completely it made him seem more human-- If he were released out into the world after that, he would not have had the desire to enslave muggles. He'd still be rather unpleasant and snarky, but I think that would be about the worst of it. As mentioned before, I think that he regretted using Dumbledore.

Look at me. Sticking up for a Dark Wizard on the simple fact that Dumbledore loved him.


__________________
"Mistletoe," said Luna dreamily, pointing at a large clump of white berries placed almost over Harry's head. He jumped out from under it. "Good thinking," said Luna seriously. "It's often infested with nargles."

Wit beyond measure...
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old June 10th, 2010, 11:31 pm
Shaun_MT  Male.gif Shaun_MT is offline
Second Year
 
Joined: 4524 days
Location: Portsmouth
Age: 29
Posts: 149
Re: Grindelwald: Character Analysis

Grindlewald is interesting because when he was younger he appears to have an air of troublemaking mischief about him judging by Harry's description. Which contrasts starkly with Tom Riddle who was seen to be charming but cold and calculated. They shared similar motives about wizards assuming their rightful place above Muggles. Unlike Voldemort though, Dumbledore said Grindlewald tried to justify it by saying it would be better for the Muggles. We all know why Voldemort harbored such anti-Muggle beliefs. He was angry about his father who not only deserted him and his mother, but was an ordinary Muggle. Not at all special which he felt he, Lord Voldemort, was. It was perhaps driven by personal self-hatred more than anything. He wasn't doing it for all wizard kind, he was doing it for himself. Whereas we never know why Grindlewald did what he did. Did he really believe it would be better for Muggles his way or was he saying it to seduce Dumbledore? It would interesting to find out how a young boy with a mischievous flare and a sense of adventure becomes one of the most feared dark wizards of his generation.


Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old June 12th, 2010, 10:05 pm
wolfbrother  Male.gif wolfbrother is offline
Sixth Year
 
Joined: 4271 days
Age: 30
Posts: 1,245
Re: Grindelwald: Character Analysis

What did you think of him?

I thought he was an interesting character. He was quite different from Voldemort though. While Voldemort was cold, calculating and always made sure that he was never caught, Grindelwald was caught multiple times and eventually expelled. I think Grindelwald was just ambitious and wanted power while Voldemort had an incredible amount of fear for death and didn't seem to understand the concept of love. Almost as if Voldemort was not completely human.

What did you make of his and Dumbledore's blossoming friendship?

IMO Dumbledore would have been very excited to have a peer with same level of intelligence to chat about. It must have been frustrating for Dumbledore that the only people with whom he could have a decent stimulating conversation were old people.

For the greater good - did they have a point (albeit not going about the right way)?

I do think they had a point. If Grindelwald had been a better individual, both he and Dumbledore may have even pulled it off.

Did the fact he was prepared to die rather than betray the wand's whereabouts redeem him?

Yes, somewhat. I think Grindelwald finally realized some things after spending years in prison.

I think this is the key difference between Voldemort and Grindelwald. I see Grindelwald as a good guy gone bad (for whatever reason). Voldemort though was twisted from the outset. IMO nothing would have changed. There was no "good guy" to go back to.


Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old June 30th, 2010, 3:50 am
No13  Male.gif No13 is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 3455 days
Posts: 12
Re: Grindelwald: Character Analysis

What did you think of him?

It' s Dumbledore' s negative. JKR implies it many times. It is Dumbledore as a bad guy, a smart person who thinks his smartness gives him the right to rule in a fascist way.

What did you make to his and Dumbledore's blossoming friendship?

Quite expected given the situation: Dumbledore looking for somebody equally smart to share his thoughts with, Grindelwald looking for friendship with powerful people. This is what makes them different: Dumbledore wanted smart companion, Grindelwald wanted power. Both being smart and powerful, they became "friends", at least Albus saw him as a friend.

For the greater good - did they have a point (albeit not going about the right way)?

Even Hermione agrees to that when, in DH, talks to Aberforth Dumbledore. "Sometimes you must think of the greater good" or something like this. We can say that Grindelwald' s "greater good" is indeed a motto and an excuse for his crimes. Surely Hermione does not have this in mind: she seems to support the view that, in the name of the greater good, some personal sacrifices are necessary. On the contrary, Grindelwald believed that, in the name of the greater good, some people can be sacrificed. Huge difference. The only common place is that there is something more than the individual good.

Did the fact he was prepared to die rather than betray the wand's whereabouts redeem him?

Up to a point yes. Dumbedore mentions that Grindelwald showed signes of remorse in his later years at Nurmengard.

Too bad his character is not presented in details. If only JKR changed her mind and wrote a prequel... I would love to read the description of the Dumbledore - Grindelwald duel. It must have been more spectacular than even the Dumbledore - Voldemort duel where powerful spells and Avanta Kedavras filled the air.

Food for thought: the Dumbledore - Grindelwald duel took place in 1945, just the year the Second World War came to an end in the Muggle World. Gellert Grindelwald sounds quite a German name to me. His "terror campaign" did not take place in Britain, Dumbledore says, nor did the Second World War (but for some air strikes)... OK, it' s too far-fetched a thought but I wonder whether, back when she wrote the PS, JKR imagined Adolf Hitler as a "puppet" of Grindelwald to conquer the Muggle World why he himself was conquering the Magical World.


__________________
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old July 6th, 2010, 12:19 pm
me_potter_fan  Male.gif me_potter_fan is offline
Fourth Year
 
Joined: 5416 days
Location: Who Cares?
Age: 28
Posts: 620
Re: Grindelwald: Character Analysis

Does anyone here have any theories of what Grindlewald's connection to World War Two was?

It is quite clear that he has a connection as he has a German name, was defeated by Dumbledore and from what I can tell fits the description of what the Nazis called an Aryan.

I believe that he may have been the Minister for Magic in Nazi Germany.


__________________


‘And now – piertotum locomotor!’ cried Professor McGonagall. And all along the corridor the statues and suits of armour jumped down from their plinths, and from the echoing crashes from the floors above and below, Harry knew that their fellows throughout the castle had done the same.
‘Hogwarts is threatened!’ shouted Professor McGonagall. ‘Man the boundaries, protect us, do your duty to our school!’
Clattering and yelling, the horde of moving statues stampeded past Harry: some of them smaller, others larger than life. There were animals too, and the clanking suits of armour brandished swords and spiked balls on chains.

Pottermore Username: HallowSkull189
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old July 14th, 2010, 1:48 pm
No13  Male.gif No13 is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 3455 days
Posts: 12
Re: Grindelwald: Character Analysis

Grindelwald MoM in WWII Germany, a very interesting thought...

When did Grindelwald flee from England? It was when Ariana was killed but which year exactly? Do we know or do we have insufficient data? Hitler rose to power in 1933.


__________________
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old July 14th, 2010, 8:02 pm
AldeberanBlack  Male.gif AldeberanBlack is offline
Secret Chocolate Keeper
 
Joined: 3753 days
Location: London
Posts: 6,178
Re: Grindelwald: Character Analysis

I admire Grindelwald. I consider Grindelwald to be second only to Dumbledore in terms of power and knowledge, and I consider him to be the greatest dark wizard in the entire HP series, far more than Voldemort since Voldemort was shockingly ignorant and inept. The relationship between him and Dumbledore was one of the most fascinating elements of the series but sadly Rowling didn't go into it in detail. I also support Grindelwald's ideology of Muggle conquest.


__________________
The Noble and Most Ancient House of Black
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old July 14th, 2010, 9:41 pm
wolfbrother  Male.gif wolfbrother is offline
Sixth Year
 
Joined: 4271 days
Age: 30
Posts: 1,245
Re: Grindelwald: Character Analysis

Quote:
Originally Posted by No13 View Post
Grindelwald MoM in WWII Germany, a very interesting thought...

When did Grindelwald flee from England? It was when Ariana was killed but which year exactly? Do we know or do we have insufficient data? Hitler rose to power in 1933.
Well, Dumbledore was born in 1881 and he was 18 when Ariana died. So Grindelwald would have fled England in 1899. Dumbledore defeated him 46 years later.


Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old July 15th, 2010, 6:03 pm
No13  Male.gif No13 is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 3455 days
Posts: 12
Re: Grindelwald: Character Analysis

Oh, my brilliant though far-fetched theory crushed and burned! Thank you for the information.


Unless... Grindelwald grew up and became powerful enough to conquer the German Magical World and promote Hitler.


__________________
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old July 26th, 2010, 4:22 pm
toujours  Female.gif toujours is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 3427 days
Location: UK
Posts: 33
Re: Grindelwald: Character Analysis

What did you think of him?
I think he's a very interesting character, especially from the point of view of 'evil' in the magical world.

What did you make to his and Dumbledore's blossoming friendship?
I think it's natural that two people on the same wave length (intelligence and interests) would develop a connection and work together.

For the greater good - did they have a point (albeit not going about the right way)?
Possibly. Taking into account the attitudes muggles had towards magic in the past (the witch hunt), they would want an environment or a certain order of things where magic could thrive without the constant danger of exposure.

Did the fact he was prepared to die rather than betray the wand's whereabouts redeem him?
I haven't actually thought of this before reading the question, I just assumed he kept it a secret because he thought Dumbledore was the worthy possessor of the wand or just plainly didn't want Voldemort to have it.


__________________

S l y t h e r i n
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old November 25th, 2010, 6:07 pm
Chrysalis's Avatar
Chrysalis  Undisclosed.gif Chrysalis is offline
Hogwarts Graduate
 
Joined: 5948 days
Location: in my leisure suite
Posts: 2,899
Re: Grindelwald: Character Analysis

I think Gellert Grindelwald is absolutely fascinating and I dearly hope JKR will write a prequel about him and Dumbledore.

He also seems to be a much cleverer and powerful than Dumbledore. His ambitions seem to be more all-encompassing (i.e. 'for the greater good' rather than just becoming immortal). I think he may have had good intentions but he got corrupted as he gained more power. I don't know if he ever loved Dumbledore in a romantic way, although I certainly think Dumbledore loved him as more than a friend, which made him very vulnerable to be used by Gellert.

I do think he felt some form of remorse in the end. I also got the feeling that he was quite contemptuous of Voldemort, that he thought Voldemort was some sort of upstart, who didn't know as much about magic as he thought he did. I think it was telling that Grindelwald was 'defeated' and imprisoned (in his own prison, no less).

I don't think that Adolf Hitler was his puppet. That would be extremely problematic, as it would remove all volition from Hitler, when everything Hitler did was his own doing. I do think he might have had some sort of destructive alliance with Hitler, or possibly those two just fed off each other. Grindelwald must've had a lot of friends and collaborators, unlike Voldemort, considering he effectively terrorised the whole of Europe. We know that Grindelwald is a German name, that he went to Durmstrang, which appears to be somwhere around the North Cape or norther Russia, and that he killed Viktor Krum's grandfather. So his reach must've been pretty wide.

I wonder though, if there was Grindelwald, whether there was also a Wizarding equivalent of Stalin? Food for thought. JKR said the Wizarding and Muggle worlds feed off each other, and Russia had been going through very dark times since 1917 (and arguably even before that).


Reply With Quote
Reply
Go Back  Chamber of Secrets > Harry Potter > The Stone > Legilimency Studies

Bookmarks

Tags
character analysis, gellert grindelwald


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 5:18 am.


Powered by: vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Original content is Copyright © MMII - MMVIII, CoSForums.com. All Rights Reserved.
Other content (posts, images, etc) is Copyright © its respective owners.