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English Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)



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  #41  
Old January 15th, 2007, 9:34 pm
quiditchwitch  Female.gif quiditchwitch is offline
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

I think British accents are pretty cool, I wish I had one. I don't really notice American accents because where i live in Canada is pretty close to the border. My grandparents are Italian though and they have excellent accents. Whenever my grandma tries to say cookie, she justs ends up with cook and they say things like "you believe the she?" I love accents!


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  #42  
Old January 15th, 2007, 9:47 pm
beatles_gal  Female.gif beatles_gal is offline
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

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Originally Posted by Lisa_Turpin View Post
It's interesting how people can tell apart different accents so well within their own countries, but when it's another nation (say the US or GB), most accents get all lumped together even when they are different.

Personally, I think any foreign (non-US) accent is really great and attractive...
that's true. i live in North Carolina (i don't have a southern accent, though! ), and some people say they can tell the difference between counties. all southern accents sound the same to me...

all this talk about us vs. british accents reminded me of a quote i read somewhere. i don't remember who said it, winston churchill maybe, but not sure. anyway, someone said that america and britain are two countries separated by a common language. i thought that was kind of cool.


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  #43  
Old January 15th, 2007, 9:51 pm
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

i love accents! my favorites would have to be english, irish, australian. i was in england for a week last summer and i could tell that the london accent and the southwestern english accent were different, but i can't exactly explain the difference. and i think i would be able to tell someone with a yorkshire accent if i heard it, cause a couple years ago a girl from yorkshire moved here.
when i went to england last summer, our delegation manager (this was a student ambassador trip by the way) was from Austria, and she had a really cool accent and said some really funny things because she wasn't completely fluent in english. it was fun.
as for american accents, i can generally tell what part of the country they're from based on the accent...usually east coast people though (north/south). i come from colorado, and i think most people generally say we don't have much of an accent, although my sister and i determined that coloradans don't put the 't' in mountain. it's usually pronounced like "moun'in"


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  #44  
Old January 15th, 2007, 10:02 pm
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

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Originally Posted by leenielou View Post
I understand that "British" is said when "English" is mainly meant, I was just wondering what precisely an English accent means to those people Is it the Queen's English?
I can only speak from a non-native speaker's perspective. British English sounds different from American English. The intonation and pronunciation is characteristic, never mind the local dialect. So whenever I hear large parts pronounced [la:dg pa:ts] (sorry no phonetic symbols installed) I know that the speaker is most likely British. I guess there is a general intonation and pronunciation that most people consider "British".

As to dialects and accents, I don't like Estuary English at all. I very much enjoy most other English, Scottish and Irish accents. Most American accents are great to understand because Americans generally speak slower than speakers of BE. I haven't come across many Australians but I met some people from Brisbane and Melbourne and I liked to hear them talk.



Last edited by Moriath; January 15th, 2007 at 10:05 pm.
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  #45  
Old January 15th, 2007, 10:02 pm
NorskHeksen  Undisclosed.gif NorskHeksen is offline
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

I'd say "British English" to Americans who don't differentiate is probably that of your average educated Londoner ... think Dan! Or Pete Townshend if you're familiar with him.

I am American but I love to hear the difference in British -- especially English -- accents. My two favorite bands are the Beatles and the Who, from Liverpool and London respectively, and when you've seen as many films by/about them as me, it's quite easy to tell the difference. Of course, I'm a linguistics student, so I'm a bit biased...

Was The Full Monty really shown with subtitles here?! I rented the DVD, so I didn't use subtitles, and I understood most of it fine. I think there were a couple of colloquialisms I didn't understand, but nothing that prevented me or my mom from understanding the movie.

I had a friend a couple years ago who was an exchange student at my university when I was a freshman, and he was from Kiev, Ukraine. His English was adorable. Some guys used to tease him because his name's Igor and they'd do the (Young Frankenstein or something? never seen it so I'm not sure lol) "Iiiigooor" thing, and he'd reply, confused, "What do you say with this 'Igor'?"


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  #46  
Old January 16th, 2007, 4:08 pm
KarateGirl  Female.gif KarateGirl is offline
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

Quote:
Originally Posted by NorskHeksen View Post
Was The Full Monty really shown with subtitles here?! I rented the DVD, so I didn't use subtitles, and I understood most of it fine. I think there were a couple of colloquialisms I didn't understand, but nothing that prevented me or my mom from understanding the movie.
That's what I was told. You're right about some of the words, to quote Wikipedia:
Sheffield slang
A good sprinkling of slang terms are used in the film. Some such as nesh (meaning feeling cold when others don't) are used in other regions whilst words such as jennel (an alley) are local to Sheffield.

Yeah, I've only ever heard jennel used where I live. It's quite interesting I think


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  #47  
Old January 16th, 2007, 4:34 pm
Claire_13  Female.gif Claire_13 is offline
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

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Originally Posted by KarateGirl View Post
That's what I was told. You're right about some of the words, to quote Wikipedia:
Sheffield slang
A good sprinkling of slang terms are used in the film. Some such as nesh (meaning feeling cold when others don't) are used in other regions whilst words such as jennel (an alley) are local to Sheffield.

Yeah, I've only ever heard jennel used where I live. It's quite interesting I think
It's funny, I've seen that film a million times (and a million times I haven't concentrated all the way through, aswell ) and I haven't heard those words before...(see brackets for probable explanation lol!)

People who are from Liverpool and have the proper accent I try to avoid talking to, it gets so MUCH on my nerves, it's really irritating >_<

People with the Leicester accent (in England) too- argh! I'm FROM there and I can't stand it, it sounds too...posh! London's too (not all, I admit-and no offence to anyone from the places I say!)
American accents...they're ok, sure! I've grown up hearing them on the TV so they're fine! Some can get annoying though, but..yeah

The Welsh accent's good, I haven't met anyone with one but I've heard it and it's ok!

But then again, it depends WHO'S got the accent


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  #48  
Old January 16th, 2007, 5:12 pm
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

Such a funny subject for my family!
In all honesty, when you're living in the southern United States, it's really hard to tell that you have a 'southern' accent - almost everybody else talks the same way (unless you're from some place like Atlanta. It's really hard to come across a southern - or should I say 'normal' accent in Atlanta).
However, my boyfriend's mother is a 'Yankee.' She moved to Georgia at sixteen, but you can still tell that she's not native - all you have to do is listen to her. The way she pronounces her syllables is much harder than the way I pronounce mine, and she tends to skip over things that I wouldn't.
What makes it really interesting, though, is when people pick us out in public - either down here, people will look straight at her (or they'll ask me, discreetly, some distance away), "She's not from here, is she?" Or else, up in New York, people will look at me strangely and go, "So, are you from Alabama?" (To which I have to reply, "Nope. Next state over. Wanna' take another guess?").
We get loads of laughs from it, though.
Strangely enough, my boyfriend has ended up being one of those people who you can't distinguish an accent there. Sometimes, his mother comes out, and sometimes, the southern drawl comes out (I have a feeling a lot of that come from me. His mum likes to say that she had a very articulate son until he fell for me. She loves me, though. ). It's always interesting to hear that mix.


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  #49  
Old January 16th, 2007, 5:23 pm
pottercomics  Male.gif pottercomics is offline
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

I never thought my Philadelphia accent was strong, but recently it's been getting worse -- and I don't know whether I should hate it or love it. I mean, 1.) it's an extremely ugly accent in my opinion -- take New York and make it a little less New England-y and you have a Philly accent but . . . 2.) I want this accent because it's almost the only culture I have, you know? We have a tendency to make words harder:

Ex: going (go - ing) becomes GO - in.

What do people think of Philadelphian accents?


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  #50  
Old January 16th, 2007, 5:38 pm
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

I have a southern accent, even though I live in Virginia. The impression I get from my northern family is that I sound like I'm from the deep south. One person I know of described me as sounding like a "Southern Belle". I think Texan whenever I hear "Southern Belle". Does anyone know where that term officially originated?

Anyway, I personally hate this accent (due to the stereotypes associated with it), and when I try to hide it, it comes out even stronger. I can't really hear it, but there are some words I say where I do, like the word "accent". I can really hear it with that. Or whenever I pronounec Brazil, I can hear it. There are some other words ("word" is another), but I can't think of any right off.

I can tell different southern ones accents; well, I think I can. For instance, my family may sound country, but my folks from the Carolinas sound extremely more country compared to us (not counting me, here since I, apparently, sound like it). They really have a drawl, and it seems the farther south you go, the more drawn out the drawl.

Oh, my father was born and raised in New York, and yet, he has no accent. Every once in a while he may pronounce some words with a northern accent, but the majority of the time, you can't really hear any type of accent at all. I don't know what type of accent he has. I really sounds like he hasn't one.

I'm not especially good with accents where the US is concerned, unless it's north and south. I know "Californian" accents, supposedly. My 8th grade teacher had one.

As for accents of people from other countries, I love British accents (English; Irish; Scottish, etc.), as I find them incredibly cool. I like Australian accents too. I love Spanish accents too. I like all accents I've ever heard, to be honest, 'cept for the ones here in America since I hear those every day in some way or form and that's boring. Oh wait, I take that back...I do like those Massachusettes accents (you know, like the Kennedys) and New York accents.


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  #51  
Old January 16th, 2007, 6:33 pm
NorskHeksen  Undisclosed.gif NorskHeksen is offline
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

Quote:
Originally Posted by KarateGirl View Post
That's what I was told. You're right about some of the words, to quote Wikipedia:
Sheffield slang
A good sprinkling of slang terms are used in the film. Some such as nesh (meaning feeling cold when others don't) are used in other regions whilst words such as jennel (an alley) are local to Sheffield.

Yeah, I've only ever heard jennel used where I live. It's quite interesting I think
Oh, "nesh", I remember that one! Groovy! I'll have to read up and then watch it again with my new knowledge.

...I have to admit, I am from the north and I've really tried to stop my bias against southern accents, but man, if that isn't a bias that's extremely hard to get rid of! I've rid myself of my bias against Ebonics, so why not southern? I know there's no factual basis for my bias, but if I don't switch my thoughts to 'linguist mode', the old annoyance comes in. I hate that... arghhh! *hugs everyone with a southern accent to show I don't really mean it*


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  #52  
Old January 16th, 2007, 6:39 pm
Hermy_05  Female.gif Hermy_05 is offline
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

I'm a weirdo with accents. My friends say that I have this weird twist between a northerner accent, a southerner accent, an English accent, a Canadian accent, and a slight Australian accent too. When ever I say something differently than most people do around here (I live in Michigan) all my friends repeat it with exageration and laugh at me. (jokingly of course)

I personally love how unique the Russian accent sounds to me but I also find the sound of an English accent really nice too. I actually love all accents just because they are a relief from the accents I've heard around me my whole life.


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  #53  
Old January 16th, 2007, 6:45 pm
pottercomics  Male.gif pottercomics is offline
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

I think when girls have soft voices and Southern accents, it sounds nice.


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  #54  
Old January 16th, 2007, 6:51 pm
Yewberryblu  Female.gif Yewberryblu is offline
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

I'm English and I love American accents and dialects ; I'm about to meet a friend from Alabama from the first time and have little idea what to expect - but I'll be disappointed if I don't hear something of a southern drawl..

I also loved the accents in the film "Fargo" - they sound so Scandinavian (which I assume is how they developed...?)

I'm from the West Country in the UK; when I was a kid I spoke with a real Devonshire burr....think of a pirate kind of accent crossed with a "yokel". I used to say things like "I be gwoin' down the shops - shall I get 'ee a passssty?"

Now I'm grown up I speak "proper" English ie without a dialect, and pretty much Received Pronunciation.

Maybe I should revert to my inner child and start frightening my colleagues with "Oo arr, proper job, me 'andsome!"


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  #55  
Old January 16th, 2007, 6:57 pm
icklek  Female.gif icklek is offline
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Madron View Post
I'm surprised that no British member has complained about the term "British accent" yet.
Scotland and England are two different countries
Quote:
Originally Posted by chi3808 View Post
Most Americans think of it just as an English accent and don't include Scottish or Irish in the mix.
Errr, has everyone forgotten about Wales???

I find it truly bizarre when people say they don't have an accent - the only person Iíve ever met who was truly accentless is a guy I went to uni with who was deaf, because he obviously hadn't learnt to speak by imitating those around him.


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  #56  
Old January 16th, 2007, 7:26 pm
Suzy_Lee  Female.gif Suzy_Lee is offline
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

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Originally Posted by RoonibWazley View Post
Most Americans actually don't have an accent. They don't put any inflection on their words (i.e., people from the northeast don't pronounce their R's, and people from the south tend to draw out their vowel sounds). Everyone else in the country has no accent.

While the lack of an inflection on the language can identify one as an American, it is still not technically correct to call it an "American accent."
All Americans have an accent - accent means the way words are pronounced therefore everyone who can speak has an accent.
A broad accent is one which differs a lot from Standard English. In UK for instance, the broader the accent, the more it diverts from RP (recieved pronunciation or BBC English)

Just thought I'd clear that up.


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  #57  
Old January 16th, 2007, 7:29 pm
Claire_13  Female.gif Claire_13 is offline
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

Quote:
Originally Posted by icklek View Post
Errr, has everyone forgotten about Wales???
obviously not! *cough*

Quote:
Originally Posted by Claire_13 View Post
The Welsh accent's good, I haven't met anyone with one but I've heard it and it's ok!
Quote:
Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)


Quote:
Originally Posted by icklek View Post
I find it truly bizarre when people say they don't have an accent - the only person Iíve ever met who was truly accentless is a guy I went to uni with who was deaf, because he obviously hadn't learnt to speak by imitating those around him.
you know, I've always wondered why we have accents, thanks for clearing that up for me

and btw, I missed another accent I like: scottish! I don't know why and it can get annoying if it's strong but... I just can't put my finger on it.

also, I'm sorry for just putting 'American accents are... ok, sure!' I haven't heard them all, as I'm sure that there's OBVIOUSLY more than one or two so, while I'm putting that, I'm saying I think they're all ok, which, technically, I can't say...I can say I've confused myself so I'll just summarise: I haven't heard ALL American accents but the ones I have heard are good


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  #58  
Old January 16th, 2007, 7:34 pm
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

I think when people say that a person doesn't seem to have an accent, is that they mean that said person doesn't have a very distinctive one. As I pointed out, my father was raised and grew up in New York. He doesn't have that typical, standard northern accent; he never has. He's lived down here in Virginia going on 23 years, but he doesn't sound "southern" either. None of us can put our finger on what type of an accent he has, so we just say he doesn't have one.


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  #59  
Old January 16th, 2007, 8:15 pm
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

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Originally Posted by SSJ_Jup81 View Post
I think when people say that a person doesn't seem to have an accent, is that they mean that said person doesn't have a very distinctive one. As I pointed out, my father was raised and grew up in New York. He doesn't have that typical, standard northern accent; he never has. He's lived down here in Virginia going on 23 years, but he doesn't sound "southern" either. None of us can put our finger on what type of an accent he has, so we just say he doesn't have one.
I do know what you mean, but as someone posted earlier today, the only people who don't have accents are people who don't speak. And I don't even want to get into the possible regional or individual varieties of sign languages.


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  #60  
Old January 16th, 2007, 8:34 pm
harmonytruetone  Female.gif harmonytruetone is offline
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

I'm from northern California, and the only thing that really sets us apart from other parts of the world is how fast we talk. Most people that I've met from the west coast talk extremely fast.
I wouldn't say we have any sort of accent, however. I mean, I doubt someone from Britain or Australia could tell where I was from just by listening to my voice.
I'd love to have some sort of accent, though.


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