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English Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)



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  #81  
Old January 17th, 2007, 1:43 pm
Yewberryblu  Female.gif Yewberryblu is offline
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

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Originally Posted by Madron View Post

Wow, really? Only 2% of speakers of English (in Britain) manage to speak RP.
Yep. I'm a lawyer, often presenting cases in court, and I've developed an RP dialect to deal with that. In colloquial speech, that is obviously softened - but I have no regional accent anymore. Pity, because not only did I grow up as a Janner (Devonshire accent) but I also learnt Geordie when I moved there as a teenager. I can switch into both with ease.

But there are proven links between social class and accent ; the more socially mobile you are (upwards, that is), the more your regional accent is likely to suffer.

The difference between a NZ and Australian accent is easy ; it's all in the pronounciation of the "i".

A New Zealander will pronounce fish and chips as "fush and chups". It really is easy to spot once you listen for it.


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  #82  
Old January 17th, 2007, 4:11 pm
GenevieveS  Female.gif GenevieveS is offline
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

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Originally Posted by SSJ_Jup81 View Post
I have a southern accent, even though I live in Virginia. The impression I get from my northern family is that I sound like I'm from the deep south. One person I know of described me as sounding like a "Southern Belle". I think Texan whenever I hear "Southern Belle". Does anyone know where that term officially originated?
The thing about southern American accents is that the further away from the deep south the listener is, the stronger they seem to think your accent is. (This may be true of most accents--if the accent is "unusual" to the listener, they think it's "strong.") I grew up in Alabama, and currently live in Georgia. No one in Alabama thinks I have a southern accent (I've even had people think I was British), but when I was in college in the mid-west, everyone I met thought I had a "lovely southern drawl."


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  #83  
Old January 18th, 2007, 1:52 am
AchelRay  Female.gif AchelRay is offline
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yewberryblu View Post
The difference between a NZ and Australian accent is easy ; it's all in the pronounciation of the "i".

A New Zealander will pronounce fish and chips as "fush and chups". It really is easy to spot once you listen for it.
I can tell the difference because I had a teacher who was from NZ and once you're around it for awhile you can pick up the differences without really thinking about it.

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Originally Posted by GenevieveS View Post
I grew up in Alabama, and currently live in Georgia. No one in Alabama thinks I have a southern accent (I've even had people think I was British), but when I was in college in the mid-west, everyone I met thought I had a "lovely southern drawl."
I think it's all got to do with what the people around you are used to. See the teacher I mentioned above to me still has a pretty strong NZ accent but his family says he has accquired an American accent. It all depends. It can be rather funny though when someone's accent becomes more pronounnced when they're mad. I've got a friend who moved here from Texas and her accent is almost gone but when she's mad the drawl comes back.


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  #84  
Old January 18th, 2007, 2:17 am
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

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Originally Posted by Xenophanes View Post
Actually, since there's a bit of talk about RP, and because the fact about only 2% of Britons speaking with it caught my eye, I'll tell you a strange little story about my accent. I've lived in Australia since I was three months old, and my parents are about fourth generation Aussies. They, my sister, and even my twin brother all talk with ordinary Australian accents, but I speak with RP. I don't mean with a posh Australian accent, or a faux-British one, I mean deadset, flat out RP.
The reason for this freak of linguistics is that my parents sent me to a speech therapist when I was around four or five. The result? Every time I meet someone they go, "So, how long are you staying here?" The truly bizarre thing is that my twin and I sound like we come from different countries. So be warned, parents: send your kids to speech therapy and they'll never talk like the rest of the country again!
Weird, I've never heard anyone else say this! I went to speech therapy as a kid as well, and I definitely think it effected my accent. My friends often raz me about saying "sore-y" instead of "sAwr-y" (sorry) and other similar things. It's usually with words with R sounds as that's what my speech therapy focused on. I wonder if that happens often with speech therapy?

My father was raised in the American South and had a thick southern accent until his early 20's when he moved out to California. If you have an accent in LA you'll be joked with constantly so he forced himself to lose it. Generally Australian and British sorts of accents are viewed as "cute" but most others are viewed as an annoyance that ought to be lost asap--maybe its the Hollywood influence.

I think accents are fascinating. I did several research papers on them in college. There are even accents in sign language for the deaf (the size, shape, exact movement of certain signs), really interesting.


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  #85  
Old January 18th, 2007, 2:20 am
jv187  Male.gif jv187 is offline
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

I wish I had a Scottish accent...


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  #86  
Old January 18th, 2007, 4:35 am
herm_own_ninny  Female.gif herm_own_ninny is offline
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

I wish I had an English accent. I think they're so cool. I don't really know what sort of accent I have. I'm from the Southern US, but people have told me I sound like I'm from Minnesota (very similar to Canadian). Go figure.... If anything, i'd say I have somewhat of a Southern accent -- or more regionally distinct, on Okie accent (kind of a mix between Southern and Texan). Maybe it's just me, but I really hate the way Southern accents are portrayed on TV. It's always way too exaggerated. The only time I've heard anyone speak with that heavy of a Southern accent was in New Orleans, and their dielect is a whole other category.
Just a side not here: Oklahoma is not full of cowboys and indians and farms. Sorry to disappoint anyone that thinks it's still the Wild West out here.


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  #87  
Old January 18th, 2007, 12:49 pm
GenevieveS  Female.gif GenevieveS is offline
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

Quote:
Originally Posted by kala_way View Post
Weird, I've never heard anyone else say this! I went to speech therapy as a kid as well, and I definitely think it effected my accent. My friends often raz me about saying "sore-y" instead of "sAwr-y" (sorry) and other similar things. It's usually with words with R sounds as that's what my speech therapy focused on. I wonder if that happens often with speech therapy?
I think it depends a little bit on the speech therapist, the age of the child in therapy, and what you're working on. I had therapy for R sounds as well (in elementary school), and I do think that's probably why I didn't pick up as much of a southern accent as I could have. My daughter had speech therapy at ages 2-3 from a New Yorker; she's now 5 and every now and then I hear a distinct New York accent on certain words. My son (6) on the other hand comes out with some real southern drawls every now and then; did you know "down" could have 4 syllables?

Quote:
Originally Posted by AchelRay
It can be rather funny though when someone's accent becomes more pronounnced when they're mad. I've got a friend who moved here from Texas and her accent is almost gone but when she's mad the drawl comes back.
I do this, too. When I've told my kids to do something several times, and finally I say "Right Now!" -- "Now" has about 3 syllables....


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  #88  
Old January 18th, 2007, 2:12 pm
saz saz is offline
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

I don't think I have ever heard someone from another country pull of what I would call an authentic Aussie accent. They always seem to make it sound like Crocodile Dundee.
I was shocked when I found out that Australian character on Lost really was an Aussie, I thought her accent was one of the fakest I'd ever heard.
The Aussie Accent seem to be one of the easiest to loose, however one of the hardest to pick up. Many Australians who move overseas loose their accent very quickly, however people who came from another country and live here for years don't seem to pick up our accent.

The one way that most people could tell if you were from a different state here is in the actual word people use rather than their voice.

Eg: In Victoria they say Cantalope, however in Queensland it is called Rockmelon.


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  #89  
Old January 18th, 2007, 2:33 pm
Icyshadow  Male.gif Icyshadow is offline
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

i dont really speak naturally in any accents, but i am a master of dialects in theater.

my theatre teacher says that i can do standard british, australian, and scottish better than anyone else in the department


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  #90  
Old January 18th, 2007, 5:29 pm
RainyDays  Female.gif RainyDays is offline
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

I really like Irish and Scottish accents. Like Seamus Finnigan's [Devon Murray's] from Harry Potter. And I like Chris Ferguson's from 'The Late Late Show'. But in general, I think all accents are cool.


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  #91  
Old January 18th, 2007, 6:49 pm
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

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Originally Posted by Lisa_Turpin View Post
It's interesting how people can tell apart different accents so well within their own countries, but when it's another nation (say the US or GB), most accents get all lumped together even when they are different.
I think it is more a matter of not being familiar with the different accents in a foreign country. You'd have to be deaf not to be able to tell a native Bostonian from a native of the Deep South if you heard them side by side. But I imagine foreigners, when they think of an American accent, think of the 'standard' pronunciation used by most people on TV, sort of generic Midwestern.

I can tell the difference between the very posh and proper British accent used by people in Jane Austen movies and the like, and some other British accents. Mostly because I have a lot of trouble understanding some of the latter! I simply don't have the practice that comes from hearing them a lot.


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  #92  
Old January 18th, 2007, 11:17 pm
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

It's interesting what people are saying about speech therapists. My brother went to one aged aroud 4/5. We live on the south side (well in the cultural North side but it's all relative) and even though he learnt how to speak all proper he still has a real Dublin accent. I have a vaguely Southside accent and my parents are from the countryside. It must have been his babysitter.

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  #93  
Old January 18th, 2007, 11:35 pm
tofo579  Female.gif tofo579 is offline
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

i live in chicago, and i lived in texas for two years when i was younger. when i first got there, i really had no idea i had any accent what so ever. then everyone was like "you talk so weird!" and i honestly didn't know that i sounded any different than everyone else. then i began to pick up on their accents, and realized how different a texas accent is from a chicago one. regarding foreign accents...i absolutely adore the australian accents. if i could pick to sound like anyone, id sound like them


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  #94  
Old January 19th, 2007, 4:17 am
AchelRay  Female.gif AchelRay is offline
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

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Originally Posted by zgirnius View Post
But I imagine foreigners, when they think of an American accent, think of the 'standard' pronunciation used by most people on TV, sort of generic Midwestern.
*raises hand* That would be my sort of accent. I think the only difference I really have on that one is I tend to drop 't's in the middle of words such as "mountain". It just sounds like I'm spitting on someone when I pronounce the 't' harder rather then a more back of the throat 't' if that makes sense? It's about the only way I can describe my accent really.


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  #95  
Old January 19th, 2007, 8:50 am
NorskHeksen  Undisclosed.gif NorskHeksen is offline
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

About the t -- yes, that makes sense. You are pronouncing it with an actual t ([t] in IPA), versus many Americans (myself included) that pronounce it with glottal stop -- the "back of the throat" sound. Very interesting... may I ask where that comes from?


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  #96  
Old January 19th, 2007, 7:29 pm
Aseldar  Undisclosed.gif Aseldar is offline
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

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Of course there is nothing like a "British accent", but I thought the one who started this thread wrote it that way as an easy way to include English, Scottish and Irish accents.
I don't know about others, but (living in the deep south--Mississippi) I find that generally when someone here uses the term "British accent" they're refering to English accents.

When we're talking Scottish accents, we say "Scottish accents". We can definitely tell the difference between English/Scottish/Irish.

(The thing is, most of us don't understand the difference between England/Britian/The UK--it's really confusing to us--in fact, I'm still confused by it. A lot of people think England/Britain/UK are the same thing...so I think that's where that comes from)


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  #97  
Old January 19th, 2007, 7:57 pm
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

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Originally Posted by Aseldar View Post
(The thing is, most of us don't understand the difference between England/Britian/The UK--it's really confusing to us--in fact, I'm still confused by it. A lot of people think England/Britain/UK are the same thing...so I think that's where that comes from)
To clear up:

Britain = England, Scotland & Wales

UK = England, Scotland, Wales & N Ireland (full name is The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland)

British Isles = Britain & Ireland (north & south)


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  #98  
Old January 19th, 2007, 10:56 pm
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

Actually I think a while ago the government decided that "British Isles" didn't exist anymore. Not sure what we are now.


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  #99  
Old January 19th, 2007, 11:13 pm
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yewberryblu View Post
A New Zealander will pronounce fish and chips as "fush and chups". It really is easy to spot once you listen for it.
Yep. Like Michael Wesley Smith on the Tribe. He also pronounces Lex "Lix"

"Illie" instead of Ellie

Gil instead of Gel

Meega instead of Mega

hehe I love the Tribe


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  #100  
Old January 20th, 2007, 11:25 am
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Re: Accents (American, British, Irish, etc...)

I love people with accents...I guess we all have an accent to other people around the world. I go 'weak at the knees' (literally in my case!) when I hear a guy speak with a French accent...


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