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  #61  
Old February 10th, 2008, 3:27 pm
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Re: German / Deutsch

I'm currently preparing for my German GCSE exams and I'm trying to prepare for my speaking topics in May. However my teacher is no help what so ever so I may be coming for help here a lot!!!

To start with, how would you say "I couldn't care less"?


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  #62  
Old February 10th, 2008, 6:38 pm
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Re: German / Deutsch

I would say "es interessiert mich kein Stück", but there is no direct translation as direct as 'I couldn't care less' ~ 'ich könnte mich um nichts weniger kümmern' (nobody would say the latter).
But I think it's a relaxed attitude for the exams.


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  #63  
Old February 11th, 2008, 8:16 pm
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Re: German / Deutsch

Or you could say "(Es) ist mir egal."


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  #64  
Old February 12th, 2008, 2:51 am
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Re: German / Deutsch

I have a question:

How hard is it to learn to speak and write German? I'm taking it as a world language next year and am wondering if I made the right choice.


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  #65  
Old February 12th, 2008, 3:51 am
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Re: German / Deutsch

Quote:
Originally Posted by SweaterVest014 View Post
I have a question:

How hard is it to learn to speak and write German? I'm taking it as a world language next year and am wondering if I made the right choice.
Well, that's a tough question. German vocabulary is not that hard, as a lot of words are very similar from German to English and vise-versa. However, German grammar is difficult because every noun has a gender that is reflected in the articles (words like "the" and "a" before the noun), and the articles change not only with the gender of the noun but also with their location in the sentence. So it's hard to really call German easy, but the words themselves aren't too hard to learn (of course, this is all my own opinion, others may feel differently).


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  #66  
Old February 12th, 2008, 4:02 am
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Re: German / Deutsch

Quote:
Originally Posted by SweaterVest014 View Post
I have a question:

How hard is it to learn to speak and write German? I'm taking it as a world language next year and am wondering if I made the right choice.
Well, I took one year of high school German and four years of high school Spanish. From what little I know so far, I'd say that (assuming English is your first language) the noun cases in German are one of the hardest things to learn, followed by which order to put the words in the sentence. But the basic verb conjugations didn't seem any harder than Spanish.
[Spanish being traditionally considered the "slacker class" ]

Honestly, though, I wish I'd taken more German classes while I was still in school.


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  #67  
Old February 12th, 2008, 8:44 am
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Re: German / Deutsch

I think the declensions are difficult to learn as they don't exist in English, not to the same extent anyway, only in the form of pronouns such as me, us, her, him. In my Icelandic class (which is worse than German in respect of declensions) my British friends struggle a lot with these whereas they are no problem for me.


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  #68  
Old February 12th, 2008, 1:11 pm
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Re: German / Deutsch

Thanks! I'm taking 4 years of Spanish in middle school, and this is my last year. I guess I found Spanish hard because we've had 4 different teachers, each with a distinctly different personality, and only one actually being from Mexico able to speak and teach Spanish REALLY well. Our class (8th grade) is still at a 6th grade level in Spanish because of the teachers moving jobs and not knowing what we've learned so far, etc.

German will be a nice change!


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  #69  
Old February 13th, 2008, 1:15 am
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Re: German / Deutsch

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Originally Posted by Tarmin View Post
I have a question. I am a German minor in college right now but I have only just finished German 1A (intro course). I was wondering, is it really that common for Germans to use the Akkusativ and the Dativ forms? I'm just wondering because they always confuse me with the article changes.

I have only lived in german for 7 years and all i could say when i got here was: eins zwei drei...
the whole akkusativ dativ thing confused me as well...

what helped me was remembering: akkusativ is when there is a movement and dativ where there isn't one...

f.e.

Akkusativ: - woHIN gehst du? - in DAS Haus.

Dativ: - wo bist du? - In DEM Haus.

I don't know if that helps... but it helped me so i thought i'd let you know...


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  #70  
Old February 13th, 2008, 9:02 am
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Re: German / Deutsch

Oh yes, the Dativ and Akkusativ are part of everyday German! But you can also make yourself udnerstood if you don't get them right. Think posivie: These case forms are harder in Russian and Icelandic!


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  #71  
Old February 23rd, 2008, 9:33 pm
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Re: German / Deutsch

Hello, all of you Deutsch speakers! I'm singing a song in German that's from a Goethe poem called "Heiden-Röslein”, and I was wondering if anyone could help me with the translation? Here’s the text:

Sah ein Knab’ ein Röslein steh’n, Röslein auf der Heiden,
war so jung und morgen schön, lief er schell, es nah’ zu seh’n,
sah’s mit vielen Freuden.
Röslein, Röslein, Röslein roth, Röslein auf der Heiden.

Knabe sprach: ich breche dich, Röslein auf der Heiden!
Röslein sprach: ich steche dich, dass du ewig denkst an mich,
und ich will’s nicht leiden.
Röslein, Röslein, Röslein roth, Röslein auf der Heiden.

Und der wilde Knabe brach’s Röslein auf der Heiden;
Röslein wehrte sich und stach’, half ihr doch kein Weh un Ach,
musst’ es eben leiden.
Röslein, Röslein, Röslein roth, Röslein auf der Heiden.

My elementary German has helped me understand some of the individual words, but I'm having trouble reading the general sentences.

Danke schön!


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  #72  
Old February 23rd, 2008, 11:02 pm
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Re: German / Deutsch

Quote:
Originally Posted by Titania View Post
Oh yes, the Dativ and Akkusativ are part of everyday German! But you can also make yourself udnerstood if you don't get them right. Think posivie: These case forms are harder in Russian and Icelandic!

LOL.... see the bright side of this... there are quite a few german dialects where people somehow mix up the dative and the accusative....

for example in south-eastern Austria people routinely say 'das sage ich dich' instead of 'das sage ich dir' (OK, the pronunciation is 'des sog i di' - but nevertheless it is technically the wrong case anyway).



Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisa_Turpin View Post
Hello, all of you Deutsch speakers! I'm singing a song in German that's from a Goethe poem called "Heiden-Röslein”, and I was wondering if anyone could help me with the translation? Here’s the text:

...
My elementary German has helped me understand some of the individual words, but I'm having trouble reading the general sentences.

Danke schön!


OK... here goes... it is quite poetic, so putting it into English properly isn't totally easy.... My translation doesn't aim to be as pretty as the original, and I'll point out where I found translating it literally very difficult.... I am doing this in a few minutes, so I am sure someone could do a better job!

Sah ein Knab’ ein Röslein steh’n, Röslein auf der Heiden,
war so jung und morgen schön, lief er schell, es nah’ zu seh’n,
sah’s mit vielen Freuden.
Röslein, Röslein, Röslein roth, Röslein auf der Heiden.


A boy saw a small rose (standing), small rose in the meadow (not sure what Heide is exactly - some sort of pasture)
it was so young and beautiful as the morning, and he ran quickly to have a look close up
He saw it with much enjoyment
Little Rose, little red rose, little rose on the meadow.


Knabe sprach: ich breche dich, Röslein auf der Heiden!
Röslein sprach: ich steche dich, dass du ewig denkst an mich,
und ich will’s nicht leiden.
Röslein, Röslein, Röslein roth, Röslein auf der Heiden.


The boy said: 'I'll break you, little rose on the meadow',
the rose said 'I'll sting you so you'll think of me for ever,
and I won't suffer it'
Little Rose, little red rose, little rose on the meadow.

(this doesn't make much more sense in German, either, unless I am missing something)

Und der wilde Knabe brach’s Röslein auf der Heiden;
Röslein wehrte sich und stach’, half ihr doch kein Weh un Ach,
musst’ es eben leiden.
Röslein, Röslein, Röslein roth, Röslein auf der Heiden.


And the wild boy broke the little rose on the meadow,
the rose defended itself and stung, but no hurt and weeping (that's not quite right but gets fairly close to the sense) helped her,
she had to suffer it all the same,
Little Rose, little red rose, little rose on the meadow.


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  #73  
Old February 24th, 2008, 5:01 pm
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Re: German / Deutsch

Quote:
Originally Posted by Klio View Post
OK... here goes... it is quite poetic, so putting it into English properly isn't totally easy.... My translation doesn't aim to be as pretty as the original, and I'll point out where I found translating it literally very difficult.... I am doing this in a few minutes, so I am sure someone could do a better job!
Thank you for your help! The piece has what is considered a "poetic" translation that can be sung instead of the German, but to get everything to fit to the music, some of the phrasing is changed so I wanted to make sure I had a literal translation of the text, too.

Danke!


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  #74  
Old February 24th, 2008, 9:53 pm
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Re: German / Deutsch

You could always check out this professional translation? I love the site because of its variety of poets. Luckily, Goethe is amongst them.


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  #75  
Old February 24th, 2008, 11:47 pm
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Re: German / Deutsch

That's rather nice..... and could be used with the melody.... but it doesn't make it easy to actually follow the german if you have SOME German, but it isn't fluent....

That's always the problem with translated poems, isn't it?


I have played around with translations of poems quite a bit (English into German, mostly) and if you want to preserve the 'feel' and the metre of the thing you have to deviate from grammar, word order and or/exact vocab ....

I am not sure, actually whether I like 'rosebud' as translation for the german 'roeslein'... literally they could mean the same thing - but I don't *see* a rosebud when I hear the German word, just a fragile little rose...


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  #76  
Old February 25th, 2008, 8:41 am
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Re: German / Deutsch

Oh Lisa_Turpin: Well, I know that German song, but it is not what you would generally expect non-Germans to sing... The language is extremely old-fashioned.


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  #77  
Old February 25th, 2008, 9:26 am
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Re: German / Deutsch

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Originally Posted by Titania View Post
Oh Lisa_Turpin: Well, I know that German song, but it is not what you would generally expect non-Germans to sing... The language is extremely old-fashioned.
As one should expect when reading a song by an 18th century poet. But I would not say that it is unusual for non-Germans to know this song. After all, a lot of Europeans know Schiller's Ode an die Freude. And let's not forget that most of our Christmas carols are old, too. Stille Nacht, Heilige Nacht, for instance, dates back to 1818.


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  #78  
Old February 25th, 2008, 11:15 am
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Re: German / Deutsch

OK, but learning that song does not really help you with your everyday German, does it?


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  #79  
Old February 25th, 2008, 2:29 pm
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Re: German / Deutsch

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OK, but learning that song does not really help you with your everyday German, does it?
No, it's probably not helping with my German, but that's why I took a German class last semester. I learned enough German to understand the sentence structure and some basic vocabulary, but as you said, this piece isn't going to help me improve upon that. However, it's a lovely little Schubert piece that isn't terribly complicated, and most people in an audience won't speak German anyway. I was just curious as to the literal translation so that I had a better idea of what I was saying and could convey the emotions better.


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  #80  
Old February 25th, 2008, 5:08 pm
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Re: German / Deutsch

You know, when I looked at the poem again (I have known both the song and the poem for ages, of course) I started wondering.....

This is Goethe, after all.... how much double meaning is there in this actually, especially at the point where he starts using the feminine pronoun 'sie' to the 'Roeslein' which is technically neuter in gender? I guess you can out a good deal of drama into this, actually.... more than simple flower picking might warrant

But hey - perhaps I have just been incredibly slow in spotting this.


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