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  #81  
Old September 13th, 2008, 7:15 pm
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Re: Gaeilge

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Dia 's muire duit, PrincessJaffa. Carbh as duit? Is brea liom nuair a deireann daoine is maith leo a bheith ag caint (no ag scriobh!) as gaeilge agus siad fos ar scoil mar bionn gach duine a ra go bhfuil an coras oideachas ag dunmaru an teanga.
Ta me i mo chonai i mBaile Atha Cliath. Ni thaitheann a lan daoine i mo bhlian gaeilge mar ta se an deacar agus ta a lan a foghlaim againn ach ta me in rang 'honours' agus is maith gach daoine sa rang gaeilge.


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  #82  
Old September 14th, 2008, 2:44 am
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Re: Gaeilge

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Ta me i mo chonai i mBaile Atha Cliath. Ni thaitheann a lan daoine i mo bhlian gaeilge mar ta se an deacar agus ta a lan a foghlaim againn ach ta me in rang 'honours' agus is maith gach daoine sa rang gaeilge.
Is rud iontach é sin! Maith thú. Rinne mé daon-iarracht san Ardteist leis an nGaeilge agus d'fhan mé sa rang honours freisin.

Ní raibh a lán suim agam sa Gaeilge tar éis an scrúdú, ach anois táim sásta arís leis an teanga náisiúnta.


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  #83  
Old October 4th, 2008, 7:09 pm
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Re: Gaeilge

I have always had a healthy interest in language. I still would love to learn gaelic. I was discouraged at an early age bec someone told me it was too hard for me. For shame. Never discourage someone's desire to learn. That person didn't live long enough to watch me study russian, french, spanish, and even arabic and japanese. I never mastered either bec there were too many demands on my intellectual time and I couldn't stay focused, but I'd love to learn gaelic just for fun. And, am I mistaken in the understanding that there is a dialect of gaelic not only for ireland but for scotland and wales? I don't know where I got that tidbit of info nor how accurate it is.

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  #84  
Old October 4th, 2008, 7:28 pm
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Re: Gaeilge

Irish is not as hard as Russian, that I promise you! If you're really interested in languages, you might like to give Irish a go now. It's not a bad thing to have even a few words!


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  #85  
Old October 5th, 2008, 5:47 pm
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Re: Gaeilge

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Originally Posted by vampiricduck View Post
Irish is not as hard as Russian, that I promise you! If you're really interested in languages, you might like to give Irish a go now. It's not a bad thing to have even a few words!
Thanks. I may do just that. I am glad to see that attempts to stamp out gaelic weren't wholely successful.

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  #86  
Old October 5th, 2008, 9:54 pm
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Re: Gaeilge

Nope, people still whispered it in the corners and made sure it survived! The number of speakers are going up actually, which is a good thing as far as I'm concerned. But it's taught in funny old ways that don't make it exciting and fun...

Nonetheless, it lives!


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  #87  
Old October 18th, 2008, 11:35 pm
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Re: Gaeilge

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Originally Posted by annie_magus View Post
I have always had a healthy interest in language. I still would love to learn gaelic. I was discouraged at an early age bec someone told me it was too hard for me. For shame. Never discourage someone's desire to learn. That person didn't live long enough to watch me study russian, french, spanish, and even arabic and japanese. I never mastered either bec there were too many demands on my intellectual time and I couldn't stay focused, but I'd love to learn gaelic just for fun. And, am I mistaken in the understanding that there is a dialect of gaelic not only for ireland but for scotland and wales? I don't know where I got that tidbit of info nor how accurate it is.

TTFN
There is Irish Gaelic which we just call Irish (or Gaeilge which is the irish word for irish), scots Gaeilc and Manx Gaelic. I think (but I'm open to correction) that Welsh is closer to Breton and Cornish.

The numbers are going up, one of the benefits I think of having a minority language is that it's very useful when going abroad! When people complain that irish isn't taught in a way that makes it interesting I wonder what the alternative is. I had a wonderful Irish teacher in school who made me love the language, she conducted the 6 years of classes through irish. I do realise it's not everyone's cup of tea though.


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  #88  
Old October 19th, 2008, 1:32 am
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Re: Gaeilge

I did the Leaving last year- I hated the Irish course, rather than the language, if you understand me. The necessity of reading depressive stories and poems, and in such huge numbers, is unbelievable and I can't see the relevance. The oral, listening and unseen sections are absolutely fine in the exams, but the 7 book excerpts, 14 poems and extra text were a little too much. I understand the need for some of them, but that amount made the course one of the longest and most tedious. So I think that's why I disliked the exam, though not the language, if you understand me! Perhaps cutting down a bit, without losing the overall integrity of the history of the course, would be more fitting.

Ba mhaith lion a bheith ábalta caint as Gaeilge nuair a táim sa tír eile, ach níl a lán suim ag my chairde!



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  #89  
Old October 19th, 2008, 2:24 pm
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Re: Gaeilge

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Originally Posted by Liselle View Post
The numbers are going up, one of the benefits I think of having a minority language is that it's very useful when going abroad!

True. Ahh, fond memories of using Gaeilge to discuss people on the metro or plan a get-away from idiots in pubs.


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When people complain that irish isn't taught in a way that makes it interesting I wonder what the alternative is. I had a wonderful Irish teacher in school who made me love the language, she conducted the 6 years of classes through irish. I do realise it's not everyone's cup of tea though.
When you consider that many people dread the oral part of the exam more than the written, it's an indication that there's something wrong. You were lucky to have a good teacher who made the lacklustre Gaeilge curriculum interesting. Spend 14 years studying Gaeilge and you're still not wholly confident to speak in the language - there's too much focus on the written and on studying a huge selection of poetry.


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Originally Posted by vampiricduck View Post
I did the Leaving last year- I hated the Irish course, rather than the language, if you understand me. The necessity of reading depressive stories and poems, and in such huge numbers, is unbelievable and I can't see the relevance. The oral, listening and unseen sections are absolutely fine in the exams, but the 7 book excerpts, 14 poems and extra text were a little too much. I understand the need for some of them, but that amount made the course one of the longest and most tedious. So I think that's why I disliked the exam, though not the language, if you understand me! Perhaps cutting down a bit, without losing the overall integrity of the history of the course, would be more fitting.

Ba mhaith lion a bheith ábalta caint as Gaeilge nuair a táim sa tír eile, ach níl a lán suim ag my chairde!


I agree, there's too much focus on studying a wide range of poems in very little depth. Fewer poems/stories but done in greater depth. When I did the Leaving, we did a drama "An Triail" as our core text and I thought it was much better than doing loads of scoithscéalta - you could study something in depth as with the English texts. More time spent actually speaking the language would be great, - is maith liom bheith ag caint as Gaeilge freisin.


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  #90  
Old October 19th, 2008, 3:19 pm
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Re: Gaeilge

We did an Triail as our extra text, yup! It made a great point, it really did, and I enjoyed reading it. But surely it would have been better to develop more from that than to focus on the poems and Stair na Gaeilge? I know its importance, but I think it ought be college level, even though I found it very interesting.

What was very interesting was that we didn't spend half enough time studying the oral section. Take it this way- I viewed my paper and I got an A1 on my written papers, one and two. My listening was in the 90s, so I must have lost out hugely on my oral to say I ended up with a B1. It proves I can write Irish, but even after three summers in Feothanach, out beyond Dingle, I still can't talk it properly.

I enjoy watching TG4 these days- it's nice to hear the language spoken- especially when I currently don't study it in college.


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  #91  
Old October 19th, 2008, 3:37 pm
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Re: Gaeilge

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Originally Posted by vampiricduck View Post
We did an Triail as our extra text, yup! It made a great point, it really did, and I enjoyed reading it. But surely it would have been better to develop more from that than to focus on the poems and Stair na Gaeilge? I know its importance, but I think it ought be college level, even though I found it very interesting.
Yeah, one text in detail would have been much better, or maybe a selection of poems by two or three poets, rather than poetry as varied as possible and from as many different times as possible.


Quote:
What was very interesting was that we didn't spend half enough time studying the oral section. Take it this way- I viewed my paper and I got an A1 on my written papers, one and two. My listening was in the 90s, so I must have lost out hugely on my oral to say I ended up with a B1. It proves I can write Irish, but even after three summers in Feothanach, out beyond Dingle, I still can't talk it properly.

Oh, you've been to Feothanach too? I liked it there- even if we were a good half hour walk from the community centre. But you have a point - doing my Leaving, I could write an essay on Faidhbeanna Soisialta or whatever more comfortably than I would have a fifteen minute conversation. Since doing Irish in college, spoken Irish comes more easily than before. I think that introducing an oral element to the Junior Cert would help a lot. In school, we did only a little Oral Work in 5th Year - one class per week, compared to 5 Written/Aural. In sixth year, maybe two oral classes. It's too little, too late, I think and a Junior Cert oral would encourage (and necessitate) spoken Irish long before 5th Year. Don't you just love re-writing the curriculum?


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I enjoy watching TG4 these days- it's nice to hear the language spoken- especially when I currently don't study it in college.
There are some good programmes on TG4, I love Paisean Faisean - the poor clueless fellas are always good for a giggle.


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  #92  
Old October 19th, 2008, 4:01 pm
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Re: Gaeilge

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Oh, you've been to Feothanach too? I liked it there- even if we were a good half hour walk from the community centre.
Feothanach was brilliant fun! No matter how often I went there, I loved it! And I was lucky, we were the closest house to the community centre, so that worked out well for me! !

Quote:
I think that introducing an oral element to the Junior Cert would help a lot. In school, we did only a little Oral Work in 5th Year - one class per week, compared to 5 Written/Aural. In sixth year, maybe two oral classes. It's too little, too late, I think and a Junior Cert oral would encourage (and necessitate) spoken Irish long before 5th Year. Don't you just love re-writing the curriculum?
Yes, I certainly do! ! I think they are actually going to do this, introduce a JC oral I mean. Being realistic, it would also offer more preparation for the Leaving Cert- which is the ultimate battle before leaving school I suppose. And, to add to that, I recently met Batt O Keeffe at a conference for students and he is indicating that the curriculum will be changed soon- to add more weight to the oral and less to the written, which to me makes a great deal of sense.


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  #93  
Old October 31st, 2008, 10:07 pm
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Re: Gaeilge

Dia dhuit! I just started to study Irish (on my own), but I'm having trouble understanding the idea of 'broad' and 'slender' consonants. Can anyone explain? Thanks!


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  #94  
Old November 4th, 2008, 9:12 pm
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Re: Gaeilge

Good luck with learning Irish, and on your own -well done!

I think you mean broad and slender vowels -
a, o, u are considered broad vowels, e and i are slender vowels. On either side of consonants, there needs to be a correspondence broad with broad and slender with slender
for example, "rithfeadh" and "deanfadh" - the conditional of to run and to make respectively. The "e" is added to the -adh ending so there is a slender vowel with a slender vowel.


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Old November 4th, 2008, 9:22 pm
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Re: Gaeilge

Ah an Triail is bringing back memories of the Leaving Cert. Quite a piece of writing.

I get what you're saying about Stair na Gaeilge, I quite enjoyed it though but I know I was in the minority


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Old November 4th, 2008, 9:34 pm
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Re: Gaeilge

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Ah an Triail is bringing back memories of the Leaving Cert. Quite a piece of writing.
I agree- a lot of things impressed me about An Triail - it was the first piece of literature I'd read in Irish that wasn't either a traditional myth or a fairly twee short story. The story was contemporary and moving. Plus, part of the appeal was my admiration for the guts it took to write and publish something like that in the oppressive, judgemental era of 1960s Ireland.


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I get what you're saying about Stair na Gaeilge, I quite enjoyed it though but I know I was in the minority
I quite enjoyed that, too. Partly because my Irish teacher taught in such a way that it was quite straightforward, and also because I'm very keen on history, and tracing the use of the Irish language and its' traditions appealed to me hugely.


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  #97  
Old November 7th, 2008, 10:26 pm
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Re: Gaeilge

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Dia dhuit! I just started to study Irish (on my own), but I'm having trouble understanding the idea of 'broad' and 'slender' consonants. Can anyone explain? Thanks!
Hey pottercomics. FurryDice explained it well about broad and slender vowels. But something in the back of my mind reminded me of broad and slender consonants. I think a broad consonant is one that comes directly after a broad vowel (e.g. the s in doras). It was that unimportant it was only mentioned once in a class about shortcuts to learning a certain list of words you very rarely need. But broad/slender vowels are important. And good luck with it.

I know when VampiricDuck went to Feothanach as I was there one of those times as well . When were you there FurryDice?


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Old November 8th, 2008, 1:33 am
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Re: Gaeilge

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I agree- a lot of things impressed me about An Triail - it was the first piece of literature I'd read in Irish that wasn't either a traditional myth or a fairly twee short story. The story was contemporary and moving. Plus, part of the appeal was my admiration for the guts it took to write and publish something like that in the oppressive, judgemental era of 1960s Ireland.
An Triail really was quite awesome. I listened to an audio version quite recently and I have to say that Máiread ni Ghráda definitely wrote something brilliant- and she was correct, society as a whole was deserving of judgement for the ideals we once stood up for.

Quote:
I quite enjoyed that, too. Partly because my Irish teacher taught in such a way that it was quite straightforward, and also because I'm very keen on history, and tracing the use of the Irish language and its' traditions appealed to me hugely.
I think the appeal is huge, absolutely. It was very interesting to hear and read about- but I have to wonder about the relative redundancy of having it be worth 30 marks- 30 marks you can willingly give up and still achieve over 90% overall. . Make it worth more, or get rid of it, I say. At present people think it's silliness to have it in the curriculum when it can actually be entirely avoided in answering.

Loved learning about the types of poetry and the old "Taoiseach" chieftain times...


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Old November 8th, 2008, 10:54 am
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Re: Gaeilge

[quote=FurryDice;5174654]
Quote:

I agree- a lot of things impressed me about An Triail - it was the first piece of literature I'd read in Irish that wasn't either a traditional myth or a fairly twee short story. The story was contemporary and moving. Plus, part of the appeal was my admiration for the guts it took to write and publish something like that in the oppressive, judgemental era of 1960s Ireland.




I quite enjoyed that, too. Partly because my Irish teacher taught in such a way that it was quite straightforward, and also because I'm very keen on history, and tracing the use of the Irish language and its' traditions appealed to me hugely.
I'm in agreement with you on all accounts An Triail was very powerful especially when you consider when it was written in Ireland yet alone written in Irish. I remember clearly the day we finished it, we were listening to it on a tape in class and even the boys in my class were deeply moved by it. It's not every piece of writing that can uniformally bring a class of teens to that point.

As for Stair na Gaeilge, I really like all the old irish myths and legends and I did really enjoy learning about the old traditions and the birth/movement of Irish and its links with other languages. I think that it's important to know where your language comes from.


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Old November 8th, 2008, 11:49 am
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Re: Gaeilge

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Nope, people still whispered it in the corners and made sure it survived! The number of speakers are going up actually, which is a good thing as far as I'm concerned. But it's taught in funny old ways that don't make it exciting and fun...

Nonetheless, it lives!
I find that across cultures the theory and practice of teaching can very sharply from what I'm used in US schools. The instructors I've had that are particularly unusual in their approach to teaching tend to be raised outside of the US.

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