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The pros and cons of being bilingual



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  #141  
Old August 18th, 2011, 1:29 pm
katielouise  Female.gif katielouise is offline
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Re: The pros and cons of being bilingual

I would love to be bilingual.
English is my first language. I took French in highschool, but I'm definitely not fluent.
If I went to France, I would be able to pick up certain words, and probably understand what people are saying, to an extent... I wouldn't be able to go around asking things or getting into a proper conversation though.

I had a friend in highschool, and he was Spanish. He'd lived in England for 8 years or so, and was fluent in both. In highschool, he took French and found it so incredibly easy to learn because it is similarxD
I was pretty jealous... xD


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  #142  
Old August 18th, 2011, 2:04 pm
TashaB  Female.gif TashaB is offline
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Re: The pros and cons of being bilingual

Quote:
Originally Posted by FGG View Post
Have you ever accidentally used words in another language during a normal conversation, because you can't remember how to say them in your mother tongue?
Yes lol, after a year living abroad I have started thinking in English sometimes... when my mother phones me I have said "yes" instead of "sí" and stuff like that.

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Originally Posted by FGG View Post
Do you feel all limited when you have to write a paper in a single language?
Not when writting, because you have all the time of the world to think what you want to put, which is a good thing.

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Originally Posted by FGG View Post

Did you read Harry Potter in more than one language, just to see what the translation was like?
I have read all of them in Spanish and 1th to 4th in English. I was curious about the names (For example, "S.P.E.W" is "P.E.D.D.O" (F.A.R.T). The "O.W.Ls" are "T.I.M.Os" (S.C.A.Ms) and "N.E.W.Ts" is "E.X.T.A.S.I.S". Voldie's name is Tom Sorvolo Ryddle so you can redo the anagram as "Yo soy Lord Voldemort". What annoys me the most is that they didn't respect Stan's and Hagrid's accents, they just talk normally.



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  #143  
Old August 18th, 2011, 11:42 pm
Sergio182  Male.gif Sergio182 is offline
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Re: The pros and cons of being bilingual

I remember this one time I was speaking in English to my best friend and I couldn't remember a word in English so I just said it in Spanish and he was all like "HUH?" and I just explained to him what I meant, it happens more often when I'm speaking Spanish but I can't remember a word in Spanish I just say it in English.
I love being bilingual!


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  #144  
Old August 19th, 2011, 2:11 pm
foralltheliving  Female.gif foralltheliving is offline
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Re: The pros and cons of being bilingual

I would absolutely love to be able to speak another language. I'm from England and I think in this country there really is no real urgency to learn anything other than English because everyone is expected to speak English when they come here.

It really annoys me though. I would love to move some where else in Europe but when I was in school we didn't start learning French until we were 11 and I was given the option to drop it at 13. Which of course I did because I wasn't a fan of my French teacher and French has never really clicked with me, I wasn't given the option to take German.

If I wanted to take beginners German in university I have to pay £250 which is like $400 but I don't have that kind of money. I'm a broke student. I would love to have a profession in languages.

I kind of blame the British education system for not pushing me to learn a language. They only focused on the pupils that picked it up quickly and were natural at it. It should be as important as English, Maths and Science.


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  #145  
Old September 10th, 2011, 12:43 pm
Lotoc_Sabbath  Male.gif Lotoc_Sabbath is offline
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Re: The pros and cons of being bilingual

Quote:
Have you ever accidentally used words in another language during a normal conversation, because you can't remember how to say them in your mother tongue?
I am Italian but I've been in an english school for 9 years of my life doing all of the subjects in english exept for italian, I have the P.E.T. and the first certificate and I am working on my C.A.E., I actually feel mother-toungue english and I often know how to express myself better in english than italian.
It often happnes to me to start a sentence in italian and end it with some english words or to know a word in english but not remembering it in italian, it happens in school two and my professors firstly were annoyed but now they are just used to it.

Quote:
Do you feel all limited when you have to write a paper in a single language?
Yes, if I could write in Ita-nglish I would express my self 10 times better, they are 2 very diffrent language and have diffrent sentence structures I'd love to use both types in the same writing piece it would change my life.

Quote:
Did you read Harry Potter in more than one language, just to see what the translation was like?
I've read the Harry potter saga 4 times: once (for the first time in italian) and three times in english. I was very curious about it and so I went for it and it changed my life, reading it in it's original language was absolutely another world, you can't even put in a comparison the two verisions, it was simply stunning, reading this in english really captured me and it is from there that I started reading nearly only in english: in my private reading I read only in english to keep it living in me since I talk italian in my life mainly, whilst with school books I read them in italian but when it happens to be an english book I actually, secretly read it in english.


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  #146  
Old September 10th, 2011, 1:04 pm
MinervaRonDobby  Male.gif MinervaRonDobby is offline
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Re: The pros and cons of being bilingual

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Originally Posted by foralltheliving View Post
I would absolutely love to be able to speak another language. I'm from England and I think in this country there really is no real urgency to learn anything other than English because everyone is expected to speak English when they come here.

It really annoys me though. I would love to move some where else in Europe but when I was in school we didn't start learning French until we were 11 and I was given the option to drop it at 13. Which of course I did because I wasn't a fan of my French teacher and French has never really clicked with me, I wasn't given the option to take German.

If I wanted to take beginners German in university I have to pay £250 which is like $400 but I don't have that kind of money. I'm a broke student. I would love to have a profession in languages.

I kind of blame the British education system for not pushing me to learn a language. They only focused on the pupils that picked it up quickly and were natural at it. It should be as important as English, Maths and Science.
I completely agree with you, but I have pushed myself to learn French and I am pleased I did (not fluent yet but hope to be), I would also love to learn German, Spanish, Italian and something like Russian...=]

I agree with you though tha everyone seems to be very lax about learning languages in Britain as English is such a comon language


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  #147  
Old September 14th, 2011, 8:08 pm
pumpkinpuff  Female.gif pumpkinpuff is offline
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Re: The pros and cons of being bilingual

I am only fluent in English, but I took Spanish in school for five years, so I have picked up quite a bit. I am nowhere near fluent, but I can read it and write it okay. And I do have a lot of Spanish phrases that I say all the time. I often say Donde esta... when I am looking for something, for instance! I used to work with a lot of native Spanish speakers and picked up some of their phrases, like Ay mi madre!

I took an adult French class last year because I've always wanted to learn French. It didn't come as easily as Spanish, but I did learn a lot. I just wish I'd taken French in high school after a couple of years of Spanish, instead of sticking with Spanish. I say this because I am quite sure I didn't really learn much more Spanish in my 3rd and 4th years. The fifth year of Spanish was in college, which was really a Spanish 1 class over again, so it doesn't count as learning anything new. If I'd switched to French, I might have learned it much better, but oh well.

Learning other languages, outside of Spanish, was not emphasized much in Florida. I really wish our schools promoted languages earlier. We didn't get to take a language until 8th grade and then only Spanish was available. In my high school, they only offered Spanish and French. My cousin in Illinois took Spanish in kindergarten and first grade, French in second and third grade and Latin in fourth and fifth. Then she starting taking Japanese in 7th grade and continued that through high school. Lucky her!

Oh, I also took a Creole class once (the language of Haiti). It was a six week course, and I did pretty well in it, but I now only remember the first day's lesson, which was "I drink" Mwen bwe. Creole is a good language for South Florida, too, because a lot of people from Haiti live there. I took the class with my mom, who was a nurse in the hospital. She had a lot of Haitian patients, so the class really helped her be able to communicate with them! I never had the chance to use the Creole I learned though. All the kids I taught in preschool were English or Spanish speakers.

Oh, I do know a lot of musical terms in Italian from my years in chorus!

I currently take care of my nieces, and their dad speaks fluent Spanish and French, but he doesn't speak it to them very often. I keep telling him he should just speak to them in Spanish or French all the time and they'll learn it, but he always does it in a formal learning way. I don't think they are going to be natural speakers like that. Any tips?


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Last edited by pumpkinpuff; September 14th, 2011 at 8:12 pm. Reason: adding more
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  #148  
Old September 15th, 2011, 6:47 pm
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Re: The pros and cons of being bilingual

You're right, the way to make kids natural speakers of a language is to use it with them all the time in day to day life. That's how I learned my native language, speaking it at home with family while living in the US attending English-language classes. It is how I have taught it to my sons as well.


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  #149  
Old December 4th, 2011, 10:32 am
Mars_Li  Female.gif Mars_Li is offline
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Re: The pros and cons of being bilingual

I guess one of the cons is slipping in and out of a language. I also didn't know how to say 'ponytail' or what it was in English until middle school. There are some limitations like that.

*plooka plooka*


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  #150  
Old December 13th, 2011, 1:10 am
Quickquill  Female.gif Quickquill is offline
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Re: The pros and cons of being bilingual

Quote:
Originally Posted by TashaB View Post

I have read all of them in Spanish and 1th to 4th in English. I was curious about the names (For example, "S.P.E.W" is "P.E.D.D.O" (F.A.R.T). The "O.W.Ls" are "T.I.M.Os" (S.C.A.Ms) and "N.E.W.Ts" is "E.X.T.A.S.I.S". Voldie's name is Tom Sorvolo Ryddle so you can redo the anagram as "Yo soy Lord Voldemort". What annoys me the most is that they didn't respect Stan's and Hagrid's accents, they just talk normally.

How would you have rendered their accents in Spanish , to express the same kind of regional or social status? What did they do with Fleur"s and Madame Maxime's accents?



Last edited by Quickquill; December 13th, 2011 at 1:17 am.
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  #151  
Old December 18th, 2011, 6:44 am
captain_mills  Male.gif captain_mills is offline
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Re: The pros and cons of being bilingual

The only con I can think of knowing more than one language is that when I am around others that are speaking another language, I understand the things they are saying. When men are talking about another woman in their tongue, when women are gossiping about another person, or when anyone is generally being rude and vulgar and don't want others around them to understand, they say things in a different language and often I understand it...


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  #152  
Old December 18th, 2011, 1:43 pm
Sharpturn  Female.gif Sharpturn is offline
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Re: The pros and cons of being bilingual

At the moment my second language (English) is my main one. For school and the like.. So it's bothersome in a way that when I'm angry, or excited, or anything drastic really, I start freaking out in French. And everyone is like.. what.. is.. happening.

And then there's the forgetting words, or never knowing words. When I was in Grade 4 they moved me to English school and I didn't know the words for anything it was just like.. slipping cold turkey. They had to get the french teacher (who knew nothing, by the way) to translate and attempt to teach me English so I wasn't behind in class.

Also, now that English is my main language, I find that I'm mediocre at both languages. So that's not good.


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  #153  
Old December 24th, 2011, 6:45 pm
Quickquill  Female.gif Quickquill is offline
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Re: The pros and cons of being bilingual

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Originally Posted by Sharpturn View Post
At the moment my second language (English) is my main one. For school and the like.. So it's bothersome in a way that when I'm angry, or excited, or anything drastic really, I start freaking out in French. And everyone is like.. what.. is.. happening.

And then there's the forgetting words, or never knowing words. When I was in Grade 4 they moved me to English school and I didn't know the words for anything it was just like.. slipping cold turkey. They had to get the french teacher (who knew nothing, by the way) to translate and attempt to teach me English so I wasn't behind in class.

Also, now that English is my main language, I find that I'm mediocre at both languages. So that's not good.
That's called being "semi-lingual". that's the phenomenon of being only partially proficient in more than one language, but not really fluent in any of them. It's a fairly common condition among immigrants, particularly those children who change countries / languages after starting school, and whose parents are so intent on learning the new language that they neglect to talk to their child in their native tongue on an academic level or to ensure that the child continues to read in their native tongue.


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  #154  
Old February 16th, 2012, 5:28 pm
sparrowinwinter  Undisclosed.gif sparrowinwinter is offline
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Re: The pros and cons of being bilingual

For me it's very frustrating at times because I don't live in an English speaking country and for some strange reason, my brain works in English (even though I was born and raised in a non English speaking country) and I try to translate my thoughts, and so often, my native language doesn't have the proper translation for what I'm trying to say. It's very frustrating.

And another thing that is impossibly annoying is that everyone asks me where I learned to speak English so well, especially my school English teacher. She drives me mad, she keeps praising me and embarrassing me by saying what a wonder kid I am to anyone who listens. Now I can see jealousy stirring up amongst my classmates. They keep making snide allusions about it.

Leaving my ranting aside, I think it's great to be fluent in as many languages as possible. It comes in handy if you want to find a job abroad or simply when you're traveling. I'm currently learning German, French and Greek ha ha. I want to be more than just bilingual.


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  #155  
Old July 29th, 2013, 9:09 pm
asdfasdf17  Undisclosed.gif asdfasdf17 is offline
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Re: The pros and cons of being bilingual

The pros are that I can communicate and understand more people as well as watch movies in my native language without subtitles! The cons are I speak with a very heavy English accent which makes it hard for people to understand me.


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