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  #41  
Old November 25th, 2004, 5:39 am
Ludivine  Female.gif Ludivine is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by starxgazer
I'm sort of a beginer at French. So bear with me.
Un & Une are the Feminime and Masculine for My
& La and Le are Feminime and Masculine for The, Correct.
Also Jouer au foot, would mean to play Soccer,
As with étudier would be To study?
I'm just making sure, I'm having some trouble understanding this stuff. Thanks.
"Un" and "Une" is masculine and feminine for "A" for example "Un chat" would be "A cat". Like "A", "Un" and "Une" refers to a non specific object or person. The masculine and feminine for "My" is "Mon" and "Ma" so "Mon chat" would be "My cat".
"Le" and "La" is masculine and feminine for "The" for example "Le chat" would be "The cat". Just like "The", "Le" and "La" refers to a specific object or person.
"Jouer au foot" is indeed "To play soccer" (or football in Europe). In Canada, we use the term soccer like in the U.S. so here we also say "Jouer au soccer".
And yes, "Étudier" is "To study".
By the way, you're not that bad.


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  #42  
Old November 25th, 2004, 10:37 am
Kehlen Crow  Female.gif Kehlen Crow is offline
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Merci bien

I know it is difficult to translate proverbs, still I would ask some help with "A bon chat, bon rat".
I know two variants of Russian translation but as it would be twice wrong to give their English transalation, I'll keep to the meaning.
is it
a) when a stubborn man meets another stubborn man and they start arguing (*diamond cut diamond)
or
b) when you say that ahead of a gifted person there lie a lot of possibilities (*a great ship needs deep waters)?


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  #43  
Old November 25th, 2004, 7:39 pm
Ludivine  Female.gif Ludivine is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kehlen Crow
Merci bien

I know it is difficult to translate proverbs, still I would ask some help with "A bon chat, bon rat".
I know two variants of Russian translation but as it would be twice wrong to give their English transalation, I'll keep to the meaning.
is it
a) when a stubborn man meets another stubborn man and they start arguing (*diamond cut diamond)
or
b) when you say that ahead of a gifted person there lie a lot of possibilities (*a great ship needs deep waters)?
It's more like a). The definition would be: when a man finds an opponant or antagonist that can resist him.


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  #44  
Old November 25th, 2004, 11:15 pm
starxgazer  Female.gif starxgazer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ludivine
"Un" and "Une" is masculine and feminine for "A" for example "Un chat" would be "A cat". Like "A", "Un" and "Une" refers to a non specific object or person. The masculine and feminine for "My" is "Mon" and "Ma" so "Mon chat" would be "My cat".
"Le" and "La" is masculine and feminine for "The" for example "Le chat" would be "The cat". Just like "The", "Le" and "La" refers to a specific object or person.
"Jouer au foot" is indeed "To play soccer" (or football in Europe). In Canada, we use the term soccer like in the U.S. so here we also say "Jouer au soccer".
And yes, "Étudier" is "To study".
By the way, you're not that bad.
Merci.


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  #45  
Old November 26th, 2004, 8:25 am
Ludivine  Female.gif Ludivine is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by starxgazer
Merci.
Ça me fait plaisir d'aider. That's what this thread is for.


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  #46  
Old November 26th, 2004, 11:26 am
Kehlen Crow  Female.gif Kehlen Crow is offline
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Ludivine, Bol'shoye spasibo! (Thank you very much )


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  #47  
Old November 26th, 2004, 6:31 pm
Ludivine  Female.gif Ludivine is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kehlen Crow
Ludivine, Bol'shoye spasibo! (Thank you very much )
Cool, how do you pronounce that?


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  #48  
Old November 29th, 2004, 1:27 pm
Kehlen Crow  Female.gif Kehlen Crow is offline
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I'll try to explain.

The main diffuculty here is that "l" is pronounced softly. (May be the difference is like between 'n' and 'gn' in French if I'm not mistaken about the last being soft).
The sign ' indicates the softness of the previous letter (when you transliterate, and in Russian we have a letter, ь, for this purpose. It has no sound itself, but makes the previous letter sound soft).

Bol'shoye - bol as in ball with soft "l", sho as in shot, ye like in yen (japanese money)

Spasibo - spa like spun, si - like French si, bo like in bog
(stressed syllables are coloured)


And as we're talking about soft letters I have a difficult question.
Could you please describe the way your tongue moves when you say n - gn in French?

I mean if you pronounce the sounds several times and pay attention you will perhaps be able to do it.

How _I_ do it for Russian sounds.
l - the end of my tongue touches my upper teeth and upper teethridge. The tongue itself is slightly curved upwards
l' - the tongue lies more flatly and it's end doesn't touch the teeth, but its end and middle part touch the teethridge.
n - the tongue lies the same way as for l' but the end doesn't touch the toothride, only the middle part.
n' - the tongue is slightly curved downwards, it's end touches the lower teeth and it touches the upper teethridge by a part a bit deeper than the middle.

(It sounds exactly like the ravings of a madman which are written in our French course book for French sounds which are impossible to follow but I hope you get it )


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Last edited by Kehlen Crow; November 29th, 2004 at 1:36 pm.
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  #49  
Old November 29th, 2004, 2:57 pm
Ludivine  Female.gif Ludivine is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kehlen Crow
I'll try to explain.

The main diffuculty here is that "l" is pronounced softly. (May be the difference is like between 'n' and 'gn' in French if I'm not mistaken about the last being soft).
The sign ' indicates the softness of the previous letter (when you transliterate, and in Russian we have a letter, ь, for this purpose. It has no sound itself, but makes the previous letter sound soft).

Bol'shoye - bol as in ball with soft "l", sho as in shot, ye like in yen (japanese money)

Spasibo - spa like spun, si - like French si, bo like in bog
(stressed syllables are coloured)


And as we're talking about soft letters I have a difficult question.
Could you please describe the way your tongue moves when you say n - gn in French?

I mean if you pronounce the sounds several times and pay attention you will perhaps be able to do it.

How _I_ do it for Russian sounds.
l - the end of my tongue touches my upper teeth and upper teethridge. The tongue itself is slightly curved upwards
l' - the tongue lies more flatly and it's end doesn't touch the teeth, but its end and middle part touch the teethridge.
n - the tongue lies the same way as for l' but the end doesn't touch the toothride, only the middle part.
n' - the tongue is slightly curved downwards, it's end touches the lower teeth and it touches the upper teethridge by a part a bit deeper than the middle.

(It sounds exactly like the ravings of a madman which are written in our French course book for French sounds which are impossible to follow but I hope you get it )
Thanks.
I'm not an expert in describing pronounciations but "n" in french is like in english and "gn", well I'm not sure how to describe it but you can take a look at this site:
French Pronunciation Guide
It has sounds clip for every letter and sound. I hope it helps. If not, just tell me and I'll find a way to explain it.


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  #50  
Old December 3rd, 2004, 9:35 pm
Kehlen Crow  Female.gif Kehlen Crow is offline
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Thank you!
Sorry it took me too long check the audio thread.

I managed to hear it, it's great. But two of the computers I tried for this purpose failed to let me listen to the sounds, so I was trying hard to get to a computer which can.
It solved my problem


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  #51  
Old December 3rd, 2004, 9:44 pm
Ludivine  Female.gif Ludivine is offline
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I'm happy to hear that it finally worked. If you have any problem with your computer, fell free to ask. Even if this is an "improve your french" thread, it helps to have your computer working fine, especially if you need to hear some audio file to help in your learning of the french language. I know enough about computers to help with a lot of problems but I have to tell you I'm not familiar with the russian version of Windows. I can stil try to help if you have a question.


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  #52  
Old December 3rd, 2004, 10:14 pm
bubblesarah  Female.gif bubblesarah is offline
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I haven't done french for three years i'm not going to start now *wonders off to the nearest art room* bye! keep up the hard work your all doing well!


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  #53  
Old December 4th, 2004, 5:29 pm
Ludivine  Female.gif Ludivine is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bubblesarah
I haven't done french for three years i'm not going to start now *wonders off to the nearest art room* bye! keep up the hard work your all doing well!
What was that all about? You don't have to come here and study french. This thread is for those who do. If you're not interested, don't post.


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  #54  
Old December 4th, 2004, 5:33 pm
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Inkwolf  Undisclosed.gif Inkwolf is offline
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No, no....I think she's just being coy. Let's all hide behind a door, grab her and MAKE her speak French.


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  #55  
Old December 4th, 2004, 5:36 pm
Ludivine  Female.gif Ludivine is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Inkwolf
No, no....I think she's just being coy. Let's all hide behind a door, grab her and MAKE her speak French.
Yeah, that would be fun!


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  #56  
Old December 4th, 2004, 11:08 pm
crocodile  Female.gif crocodile is offline
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Hello? This might be a really dumb question, sorry if it is.

Yesterday I was doing my French homework in MS word, and I realized I didn't know how to say things like "I know I'm ambitious" or "I think you're lazy"

I typed in "Je sais je suis ambitieuse" and "Je pense tu est paresseuse". MS word graciously informed me that these phrases were incorrect but didn't supply me with any subsituting phrases. What is the right way of saying these?

Thank you sooooooooo much.


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  #57  
Old December 4th, 2004, 11:12 pm
Oro  Male.gif Oro is offline
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You forget the "que" (= "that" in english, but obligatory in french)

"Je sais que je suis ambitieuse", et "Je pense que tu es paresseuse"

Bonne chance ! ^^


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  #58  
Old December 5th, 2004, 12:05 am
Ludivine  Female.gif Ludivine is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oro
You forget the "que" (= "that" in english, but obligatory in french)

"Je sais que je suis ambitieuse", et "Je pense que tu es paresseuse"

Bonne chance ! ^^
Merci pour ton aide Oro, je ne peux pas être toujours la seule à répondre aux question, c'est quand même une grosse charge de travail, même si j'aime bien le faire. Penses-tu revenir me donner un petit coup de main à d'autres moments?

Quote:
Originally Posted by crocodile
I typed in "Je sais je suis ambitieuse" and "Je pense tu est paresseuse". MS word graciously informed me that these phrases were incorrect but didn't supply me with any subsituting phrases. What is the right way of saying these?
There is another mistake in your second sentence. Like Oro said, you should write "tu es" and not "tu est". The verbs in the second person of the singular almost always end with an "s". There are some exceptions but the verb "être" is not one of them.


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Last edited by Ludivine; December 5th, 2004 at 12:10 am.
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  #59  
Old December 5th, 2004, 12:12 am
Oro  Male.gif Oro is offline
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Y a pas de problême, si à l'occasion je peux t'aider c'est avec grand plaisir.


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  #60  
Old December 5th, 2004, 7:34 pm
Ludivine  Female.gif Ludivine is offline
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Merci.


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