Login  
 
 
Go Back   Chamber of Secrets > Diagon Alley > The Language Lab

Beauxbatons: the place to improve your French



Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #61  
Old December 5th, 2004, 7:59 pm
Vance  Female.gif Vance is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 5272 days
Location: United States
Posts: 86
I have a quick question: In French, is the futur antérieur commonly used? It sounds really awkward in English, but I know even though it sounds weird in English that doesn't necessarily mean that it is in French. Thanks for this thread, it's really helpful. (I'll probably have a lot of questions when I start French next semester. Just a warning.)


Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #62  
Old December 5th, 2004, 8:07 pm
Ludivine  Female.gif Ludivine is offline
Fifth Year
 
Joined: 5319 days
Location: Montreal
Age: 40
Posts: 709
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vance
I have a quick question: In French, is the futur antérieur commonly used? It sounds really awkward in English, but I know even though it sounds weird in English that doesn't necessarily mean that it is in French. Thanks for this thread, it's really helpful. (I'll probably have a lot of questions when I start French next semester. Just a warning.)
Yes, it's used quite often to describe an action that will take place and end at a specific point in the future. For example: "Je serai partie à midi" ("I will have left at noon")


__________________
Reply With Quote
  #63  
Old December 6th, 2004, 2:57 pm
Kehlen Crow  Female.gif Kehlen Crow is offline
Second Year
 
Joined: 5213 days
Location: Moscow
Age: 37
Posts: 171
Ludivine, thanks for your proposal

These computers I mentioned are at my work where I don't really need to listen to web sounds very often.
And also I don't think I can find the reason of their failure. Still I'll tell you the sympthoms: they (computers) play other MP3 files OK, and also they download the files from this site (with french sounds) but remain numb when I tell them to play it - the Winamp slider is moving, the speakers hum but say nothing.


__________________
Limit size of font #3
Reply With Quote
  #64  
Old December 6th, 2004, 7:24 pm
Vance  Female.gif Vance is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 5272 days
Location: United States
Posts: 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ludivine
Yes, it's used quite often to describe an action that will take place and end at a specific point in the future. For example: "Je serai partie à midi" ("I will have left at noon")
Merci.

So in a way is the futur antérieur like the passé composé (beginning and ending at a certain point) and the general futur tense like the imparfait (a presumably ongoing action)?

This is just sort of a random question. Is the difference between Canadian French and French similiar to that of British English and American English, in that there are different words, but there shouldn't really be any communication problems? Or is there a bigger (or lesser) difference? Thanks for your time.


Reply With Quote
  #65  
Old December 6th, 2004, 7:25 pm
Ludivine  Female.gif Ludivine is offline
Fifth Year
 
Joined: 5319 days
Location: Montreal
Age: 40
Posts: 709
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kehlen Crow
Ludivine, thanks for your proposal

These computers I mentioned are at my work where I don't really need to listen to web sounds very often.
And also I don't think I can find the reason of their failure. Still I'll tell you the sympthoms: they (computers) play other MP3 files OK, and also they download the files from this site (with french sounds) but remain numb when I tell them to play it - the Winamp slider is moving, the speakers hum but say nothing.
That's weird because the files on the "french pronounciation guide" are MP3 too. Did you try playing the other MP3 files (the ones that worked) on the same computer on the same day? Because it sounds like the speakers are not plugged in the right place. What version of Winamp are you using? You can also try opening them with Windows Media Player. You just have to open the Media Player first and load the files you want to listen too after. (Because it seems that the computers at your work place automaticaly opens MP3 with Winamp).


__________________

Last edited by Ludivine; December 6th, 2004 at 7:28 pm.
Reply With Quote
  #66  
Old December 10th, 2004, 4:05 pm
Kehlen Crow  Female.gif Kehlen Crow is offline
Second Year
 
Joined: 5213 days
Location: Moscow
Age: 37
Posts: 171
Yes, you're right, Ludivine, it is nothing wrong with the site - it is something wrong with this computer - the Winamp here refuses to play other MP3-ies too.
So I'll be fixing it!
Thanks for your advice!


__________________
Limit size of font #3
Reply With Quote
  #67  
Old December 10th, 2004, 5:24 pm
eterna_shining  Female.gif eterna_shining is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 5154 days
Location: Southern California
Age: 30
Posts: 11
Suh-weeeet. I just started learning French a few months ago, and I get most of it, but I'm still confused about inversions.

Okay, so here's a basic inversion. "Parler-vous français?" roughly means "You speak French?", am I right? And it would normally be, "Est-ce que tu parles français" meaning, "is it that you speak French?", right? So... you take the verb, put it in the infinitive form, put the noun after it...? I'm confused.


Reply With Quote
  #68  
Old December 10th, 2004, 8:48 pm
PoppyFairy  Female.gif PoppyFairy is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 5958 days
Location: my beloved theatre
Age: 29
Posts: 24
well, yes , at the beginning it does get confusing, but then, it just gets clearer.


__________________
"Sadly There Are No Queen Lears"
Dame Maggie Smith


Reply With Quote
  #69  
Old December 10th, 2004, 8:59 pm
ChrisStephenHP  Male.gif ChrisStephenHP is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 5164 days
Location: Indiana
Age: 33
Posts: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by eterna_shining
Okay, so here's a basic inversion. "Parler-vous français?" roughly means "You speak French?", am I right? ... I'm confused.
Salut eterna_shining!

OK, I believe you are confused because you don't put the verb into the infinitive. So, for the above question ("Do you speak French?"), you would use "Parlez-vous français?" ... perhaps you are confused because both parler and parlez are pronounced "parl-AY".

Similarly, if you were to ask "Are we going to Jean's house?", you would write "Allons-nous chez Jean?"

Hope this helped!


__________________
<img src="http://nimbo.net/quiz/raven.gif" alt="I'm in Ravenclaw!"><br>
<a href="http://nimbo.net/quiz/houses.html" target="0">be sorted</a> @ <a href="http://nimbo.net" target="0">nimbo.net</a>

"Wit beyond measure is man's greatest treasure..." <br><br>
Ravenclaw...nous pouvons le faire meilleur.


The terminology "two degrees of separation", used frequently by me in my posts, was originated by BeachBum on the CoS Forums and BeachBum recently wrote an essay of the same title that was published in "The Plot Thickens...Harry Potter Investigated by Fans for Fans." Wizarding World Press: Niles, IL, 2004.

Hey guys, check out "The Phoenix Files", a new Mugglenet column written by YOURS TRULY, Christopher Stephen!!
Reply With Quote
  #70  
Old December 10th, 2004, 9:09 pm
eterna_shining  Female.gif eterna_shining is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 5154 days
Location: Southern California
Age: 30
Posts: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisStephenHP
Salut eterna_shining!

OK, I believe you are confused because you don't put the verb into the infinitive. So, for the above question ("Do you speak French?"), you would use "Parlez-vous français?" ... perhaps you are confused because both parler and parlez are pronounced "parl-AY".

Similarly, if you were to ask "Are we going to Jean's house?", you would write "Allons-nous chez Jean?"

Hope this helped!
Salut!

Ohhh I get it! Haha, that makes more sense. So, are you eating at the house would be "Mangez-vous a la maison?"

Even if I got it wrong, thanks for the help!


Reply With Quote
  #71  
Old December 10th, 2004, 9:12 pm
Ludivine  Female.gif Ludivine is offline
Fifth Year
 
Joined: 5319 days
Location: Montreal
Age: 40
Posts: 709
Quote:
Originally Posted by eterna_shining
Salut!

Ohhh I get it! Haha, that makes more sense. So, are you eating at the house would be "Mangez-vous a la maison?"

Even if I got it wrong, thanks for the help!
You got it right.


__________________
Reply With Quote
  #72  
Old December 10th, 2004, 9:31 pm
eterna_shining  Female.gif eterna_shining is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 5154 days
Location: Southern California
Age: 30
Posts: 11
Hurray, I actually got it.


Reply With Quote
  #73  
Old December 10th, 2004, 9:38 pm
Ludivine  Female.gif Ludivine is offline
Fifth Year
 
Joined: 5319 days
Location: Montreal
Age: 40
Posts: 709
Quote:
Originally Posted by eterna_shining
Hurray, I actually got it.
You just forgot to put "à" instead of "a" in "à la maison" but I assume that is because you can't type accents with you keyboard. If you are experiencing problems with typing the accents, take a look at the first posts in this thread where I explain how to do it.


__________________
Reply With Quote
  #74  
Old December 10th, 2004, 9:41 pm
arabesque1726  Female.gif arabesque1726 is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 5316 days
Age: 32
Posts: 37
I'm in my fifth year of french, but this one always gets me:
Il me manque= I miss him, right?
I look at this, and my little english brain thinks "he misses me." I know the difference, but am I not fully understanding how the verb is translated? Is it more like "he is missing to me"?

Go raibh maith agat, merci, thanks.


Reply With Quote
  #75  
Old December 10th, 2004, 9:45 pm
Ludivine  Female.gif Ludivine is offline
Fifth Year
 
Joined: 5319 days
Location: Montreal
Age: 40
Posts: 709
Quote:
Originally Posted by arabesque1726
I'm in my fifth year of french, but this one always gets me:
Il me manque= I miss him, right?
I look at this, and my little english brain thinks "he misses me." I know the difference, but am I not fully understanding how the verb is translated? Is it more like "he is missing to me"?

Go raibh maith agat, merci, thanks.
You got is right the first time "Il me manque" is "I miss him". You can't always translate literally from another language. "He misses me" would be "Je lui manque". Just remember that for that particular phrase, in french it's the opposite of english. I just don't know why though.


__________________
Reply With Quote
  #76  
Old December 10th, 2004, 10:03 pm
ChrisStephenHP  Male.gif ChrisStephenHP is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 5164 days
Location: Indiana
Age: 33
Posts: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ludivine
You got is right the first time "Il me manque" is "I miss him". You can't always translate literally from another language. "He misses me" would be "Je lui manque". Just remember that for that particular phrase, in french it's the opposite of english. I just don't know why though.
Oui, c'est vrai. There's another verb phrase that's like that, I believe. For example:

Il me faut faire = I must do it
If you're trying to translate it literally, I suppose the best way to do it would be to say "It is neccessary for me to do"

"France me manque" would then mean "I miss France" instead of "France misses me".


__________________
<img src="http://nimbo.net/quiz/raven.gif" alt="I'm in Ravenclaw!"><br>
<a href="http://nimbo.net/quiz/houses.html" target="0">be sorted</a> @ <a href="http://nimbo.net" target="0">nimbo.net</a>

"Wit beyond measure is man's greatest treasure..." <br><br>
Ravenclaw...nous pouvons le faire meilleur.


The terminology "two degrees of separation", used frequently by me in my posts, was originated by BeachBum on the CoS Forums and BeachBum recently wrote an essay of the same title that was published in "The Plot Thickens...Harry Potter Investigated by Fans for Fans." Wizarding World Press: Niles, IL, 2004.

Hey guys, check out "The Phoenix Files", a new Mugglenet column written by YOURS TRULY, Christopher Stephen!!
Reply With Quote
  #77  
Old December 11th, 2004, 3:45 am
Ludivine  Female.gif Ludivine is offline
Fifth Year
 
Joined: 5319 days
Location: Montreal
Age: 40
Posts: 709
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisStephenHP
Oui, c'est vrai. There's another verb phrase that's like that, I believe. For example:

Il me faut faire = I must do it
If you're trying to translate it literally, I suppose the best way to do it would be to say "It is neccessary for me to do"
But that's not as common as "il faut que je le fasse".


__________________
Reply With Quote
  #78  
Old December 11th, 2004, 9:18 pm
Kehlen Crow  Female.gif Kehlen Crow is offline
Second Year
 
Joined: 5213 days
Location: Moscow
Age: 37
Posts: 171
I also have two questions, if you please.

The first one - is it necessary to put accents on uppercase letters? (In our text-book they don't and in an e-book I have they do). For example: "À la maison..." or "A la maison..."?

Another question. In english we can say either "noon" or 12 p.m. and either "midnight" or 12 a.m. And are there any such variants in french, or simply "midi" and "minuit"?
I'm also confused about the times of the day. If it is 1 a.m., or 11 p.m., how do we say so? And when do we start saying "x heures du matin"?

(There is a problem in Russian how to greet a man. Either "good morning" or "good day" or "good evening" but I always doubt which one to choose , especially in winter when it is dark at 4 p.m. but still "a day")


__________________
Limit size of font #3
Reply With Quote
  #79  
Old December 11th, 2004, 9:30 pm
Ludivine  Female.gif Ludivine is offline
Fifth Year
 
Joined: 5319 days
Location: Montreal
Age: 40
Posts: 709
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kehlen Crow
I also have two questions, if you please.

The first one - is it necessary to put accents on uppercase letters? (In our text-book they don't and in an e-book I have they do). For example: "À la maison..." or "A la maison..."?"
A few years ago, we did not put accents on uppercase letters but now we do. Some people still write uppercase letters without accents.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kehlen Crow
Another question. In english we can say either "noon" or 12 p.m. and either "midnight" or 12 a.m. And are there any such variants in french, or simply "midi" and "minuit"?
I'm also confused about the times of the day. If it is 1 a.m., or 11 p.m., how do we say so? And when do we start saying "x heures du matin"?
We usually say midi and minuit. If it is 1 a.m., we say it is "une heure" or "une heure du matin" and if it is 11 p.m., we say it is "23 heures" or "11 heures du soir". We start saying "x heures du matin" from 1 a.m.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kehlen Crow
(There is a problem in Russian how to greet a man. Either "good morning" or "good day" or "good evening" but I always doubt which one to choose , especially in winter when it is dark at 4 p.m. but still "a day")
I'm not really sure of the convention in french. I work evening shifts and I tend to be confused about the time it is so I often say "bonsoir" during the day and "bonjour" during the evening. I think you are supposed to say "bonsoir" when it's getting dark but I'm not sure. We use "bonne nuit" only when going to bed or leaving someone at night.


__________________
Reply With Quote
  #80  
Old December 12th, 2004, 2:07 am
ChrisStephenHP  Male.gif ChrisStephenHP is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 5164 days
Location: Indiana
Age: 33
Posts: 10
Anyway, yeah I speak French decently well...I found out my problem when I actually travelled to France was that I don't have enough vocabulary to get me by! For example, I was just randomly talking to a person and I couldn't remember the word for "pillow". I can do most of the verb conjugations I need to and I'll try to help those of you with more basic questions (I only took four years in high school so far, but I'm planning to take it here at "l'Universite de Notre Dame du lac"! Ludivine, your help is greatly apprecaited. Hopefully I can be of some assistance as well...


__________________
<img src="http://nimbo.net/quiz/raven.gif" alt="I'm in Ravenclaw!"><br>
<a href="http://nimbo.net/quiz/houses.html" target="0">be sorted</a> @ <a href="http://nimbo.net" target="0">nimbo.net</a>

"Wit beyond measure is man's greatest treasure..." <br><br>
Ravenclaw...nous pouvons le faire meilleur.


The terminology "two degrees of separation", used frequently by me in my posts, was originated by BeachBum on the CoS Forums and BeachBum recently wrote an essay of the same title that was published in "The Plot Thickens...Harry Potter Investigated by Fans for Fans." Wizarding World Press: Niles, IL, 2004.

Hey guys, check out "The Phoenix Files", a new Mugglenet column written by YOURS TRULY, Christopher Stephen!!
Reply With Quote
Reply
Go Back  Chamber of Secrets > Diagon Alley > The Language Lab

Bookmarks

Tags
french


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 3:56 am.


Powered by: vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Original content is Copyright © MMII - MMVIII, CoSForums.com. All Rights Reserved.
Other content (posts, images, etc) is Copyright © its respective owners.