Login  
 
 
Go Back   Chamber of Secrets > Diagon Alley > The Language Lab

Beauxbatons: the place to improve your French



Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #81  
Old December 12th, 2004, 7:18 pm
Serpentine's Avatar
Serpentine  Undisclosed.gif Serpentine is offline
Fifth Year
 
Joined: 5653 days
Location: Posing as Jo's shoe
Posts: 945
Salut tous! Quelle belle surprise de trouver une discussion sur le francais ici. (Sorry, but my keyboard doesn't have the "cdille" that should go under the c. )

Hi everyone! What a nice surprise to find a French thread here. My French is fairly decent too (so up to a certain degree I should be able to be of assistance), but I could use some training in active usage too. Any correction help by francophone native speakers is also greatly appreciated.


__________________
We are only as strong as we are united, as weak as we are divided.
Differences of habit and language are nothing at all if our aims are identical and our hearts are open.

(Dumbledore in 'Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire')




My Snape fanfics: Reflections (F&B), The Red Light of the Sun (F&B), The Trapdoor Trials 1, 2, 3 (in "Snape's POV 2"),
Greetings from Down Under and An Unusual Patronus ... are hereby shamelessly advertised
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #82  
Old December 12th, 2004, 8:24 pm
Ludivine  Female.gif Ludivine is offline
Fifth Year
 
Joined: 5319 days
Location: Montreal
Age: 40
Posts: 709
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serpentine
Salut tous! Quelle belle surprise de trouver une discussion sur le francais ici. (Sorry, but my keyboard doesn't have the "cdille" that should go under the c. )
Your french seems pretty good. For the "" you should take a look at my first posts in this thread where I explain how to do it using the Alt commands.


__________________
Reply With Quote
  #83  
Old December 12th, 2004, 8:32 pm
Oro  Male.gif Oro is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 5188 days
Location: Paris, France
Age: 34
Posts: 66
Serpentine, your french is very good. Clap, clap, clap...


Reply With Quote
  #84  
Old December 12th, 2004, 8:38 pm
Ludivine  Female.gif Ludivine is offline
Fifth Year
 
Joined: 5319 days
Location: Montreal
Age: 40
Posts: 709
I think I should post the Alt commands again since people are still having problems with the accents. Here they are:

Quote:
: Alt 128
: Alt 130
: Alt 131
: Alt 133
: Alt 135
: Alt 136
: Alt 137
: Alt 138
: Alt 139
: Alt 140
: Alt 147
: Alt 150
: Alt 151
: Alt 160
: Alt 0192
: Alt 0194
: Alt 0200
: Alt 0201
: Alt 0202
: Alt 0203
: Alt 0206
: Alt 0207
: Alt 0212
: Alt 0217
: Alt 0219


__________________
Reply With Quote
  #85  
Old December 13th, 2004, 1:24 am
Inkwolf's Avatar
Inkwolf  Undisclosed.gif Inkwolf is offline
I trusted Severus Snape
 
Joined: 5967 days
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 5,305
Que belle-a-til, quand on eu une Macintosh. Plus des Alt keys!

! Neener, neener!

And how much MORE belle it would a if I wrote French as well as you do, Serpentine.


Reply With Quote
  #86  
Old December 13th, 2004, 6:30 pm
Ludivine  Female.gif Ludivine is offline
Fifth Year
 
Joined: 5319 days
Location: Montreal
Age: 40
Posts: 709
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inkwolf
Que belle-a-til, quand on eu une Macintosh. Plus des Alt keys!

! Neener, neener!

And how much MORE belle it would a if I wrote French as well as you do, Serpentine.
I'm not sure what you mean. If you mean the people using a Mac cannot use the alt commands, you can just cut and paste the letters with the accents in my list. It takes more time but it should work.


__________________
Reply With Quote
  #87  
Old December 13th, 2004, 9:22 pm
Inkwolf's Avatar
Inkwolf  Undisclosed.gif Inkwolf is offline
I trusted Severus Snape
 
Joined: 5967 days
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 5,305
There, see how bad my French is?

No, I mean I don't NEED to use the ALT keys.

Just hold down the Option key and press c and voila!

Hold down the option key and press e, and then an e or a, and you get an acute accent.

Hold down the Option key and hit u, and you get an umlaut over the next vowel.

Hold down the option key and an s, and you get an umschloss (or whatever they call it), O and you get one of those funky scandinavian crossed-out o's, n and you get a tilde, and so on.

Sooooo easy! Macs rock! Of course right now I'm on the PC at work, or I'd show you what I mean.


Reply With Quote
  #88  
Old December 13th, 2004, 11:09 pm
Ludivine  Female.gif Ludivine is offline
Fifth Year
 
Joined: 5319 days
Location: Montreal
Age: 40
Posts: 709
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inkwolf
There, see how bad my French is?

No, I mean I don't NEED to use the ALT keys.

Just hold down the Option key and press c and voila!

Hold down the option key and press e, and then an e or a, and you get an acute accent.

Hold down the Option key and hit u, and you get an umlaut over the next vowel.

Hold down the option key and an s, and you get an umschloss (or whatever they call it), O and you get one of those funky scandinavian crossed-out o's, n and you get a tilde, and so on.

Sooooo easy! Macs rock! Of course right now I'm on the PC at work, or I'd show you what I mean.
For me it's even easier, I just type the letter with the accent right away. Ha!


__________________
Reply With Quote
  #89  
Old December 14th, 2004, 1:37 pm
Kehlen Crow  Female.gif Kehlen Crow is offline
Second Year
 
Joined: 5213 days
Location: Moscow
Age: 37
Posts: 171
Thanks for you answers. I usually say "good night" when it's dark too.

And I think I could comment on the phrases "Il me faut faire" and "il me manque". (or am I too brave to do so after 3 months of french studies?)
Anyway, I think it is a good practice to try to interpet the other language's grammar in your own words.
Could you please check if my interpretation is correct?

"Il faut faire" - it is an "impersonal sentence" and "il" doesn't mean "he" in it. The translation should be "It should be done..." or "It is nesessary to do..."
And the phrase we use with hours - "Il est.. neuf heures" - that's another "impersonal sentence"
And concerning weather: "Il fait chaud", "il fait froid".
- The impersonal sentences are mailnly translated as "it is...".

Manquer - I consulted a dictionary, "il manque" - another "verbe impersonnel".
(it could be either "there is not enough..." or "he hasn't enough...")

and there are also these phrases for "manquer"
- la parole lui manque (~his words fail him, he isn't able to speak)
- la mmoire lui manque (~his memory fails him)
so if I drag the phrase "il me manque" in to these sequence, it could be roughly translated as - "it's him whom I have not enough of" or "I miss him".


__________________
Limit size of font #3
Reply With Quote
  #90  
Old December 14th, 2004, 5:06 pm
ChrisStephenHP  Male.gif ChrisStephenHP is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 5164 days
Location: Indiana
Age: 33
Posts: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kehlen Crow
Thanks for you answers. I usually say "good night" when it's dark too.

And I think I could comment on the phrases "Il me faut faire" and "il me manque". (or am I too brave to do so after 3 months of french studies?)
Anyway, I think it is a good practice to try to interpet the other language's grammar in your own words.
Could you please check if my interpretation is correct?

"Il faut faire" - it is an "impersonal sentence" and "il" doesn't mean "he" in it. The translation should be "It should be done..." or "It is nesessary to do..."
And the phrase we use with hours - "Il est.. neuf heures" - that's another "impersonal sentence"
And concerning weather: "Il fait chaud", "il fait froid".
- The impersonal sentences are mailnly translated as "it is...".

Manquer - I consulted a dictionary, "il manque" - another "verbe impersonnel".
(it could be either "there is not enough..." or "he hasn't enough...")

and there are also these phrases for "manquer"
- la parole lui manque (~his words fail him, he isn't able to speak)
- la mmoire lui manque (~his memory fails him)
so if I drag the phrase "il me manque" in to these sequence, it could be roughly translated as - "it's him whom I have not enough of" or "I miss him".
I believe that is correct. The impersonal verbs are a good point, with good examples. It's really tough to literally translate (verbatim) the French in these cases; often, I don't even try.


__________________
<img src="http://nimbo.net/quiz/raven.gif" alt="I'm in Ravenclaw!"><br>
<a href="http://nimbo.net/quiz/houses.html" target="0">be sorted</a> @ <a href="http://nimbo.net" target="0">nimbo.net</a>

"Wit beyond measure is man's greatest treasure..." <br><br>
Ravenclaw...nous pouvons le faire meilleur.


The terminology "two degrees of separation", used frequently by me in my posts, was originated by BeachBum on the CoS Forums and BeachBum recently wrote an essay of the same title that was published in "The Plot Thickens...Harry Potter Investigated by Fans for Fans." Wizarding World Press: Niles, IL, 2004.

Hey guys, check out "The Phoenix Files", a new Mugglenet column written by YOURS TRULY, Christopher Stephen!!
Reply With Quote
  #91  
Old December 16th, 2004, 4:01 am
Senna Wells  Female.gif Senna Wells is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 5247 days
Location: USA
Posts: 19
Wow, hats off for having a French help forum. I'm on my fourth year of the language and it still turns my head sometimes. I'll have to check in on this and see what I can learn. Merci beaucoup, chaps.


__________________
"I hear their passionate music/Read the words/That touch my heart/I wish I had that instinct-/I wish I had that drive..." ~Rush "Hold Your Fire"
Reply With Quote
  #92  
Old December 16th, 2004, 4:57 am
Sniffles4Snuffles  Female.gif Sniffles4Snuffles is offline
Second Year
 
Joined: 5645 days
Location: Ohio
Age: 30
Posts: 95
How do you say "I'm going to fail next semester's French class because my past french teacher did not know how to teach!"? Just kidding, I don't really need to know because I wouldn't understand a bit of it. I'm so glad I stumbled upon this thread. My teacher for the past two years was absolutely horrible, though she is a lovely woman, just an awful awful teacher. So in January I start with a new excellent and hard teacher and if I don't get any help, I (along with all my peers) am going to fail the class.

And I'm going to France in March so I'd like to know *some things* So first thing, just to refresh my memory a tad--- how are these pronounced-> and ? Not sure if that is the right question, but I always get confused with those two accents in particular and never wrote them correctly...

And thanks for making this brilliant thread!


__________________
Reply With Quote
  #93  
Old December 16th, 2004, 10:55 am
Kehlen Crow  Female.gif Kehlen Crow is offline
Second Year
 
Joined: 5213 days
Location: Moscow
Age: 37
Posts: 171
I have a new question, too.

This thing puzzles me: there are adjectives which you put before the noun, and the ones you put after it (e.g. une petite voiture noire).
But there are some which can be in both places, and how do I know where to put them?

For example, new. My dictionary says: - un journal nouveau (new newspaper) but - un nouveau personnage (new person).


__________________
Limit size of font #3
Reply With Quote
  #94  
Old December 16th, 2004, 6:40 pm
Ludivine  Female.gif Ludivine is offline
Fifth Year
 
Joined: 5319 days
Location: Montreal
Age: 40
Posts: 709
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kehlen Crow
Thanks for you answers. I usually say "good night" when it's dark too.

And I think I could comment on the phrases "Il me faut faire" and "il me manque". (or am I too brave to do so after 3 months of french studies?)
Anyway, I think it is a good practice to try to interpet the other language's grammar in your own words.
Could you please check if my interpretation is correct?

"Il faut faire" - it is an "impersonal sentence" and "il" doesn't mean "he" in it. The translation should be "It should be done..." or "It is nesessary to do..."
And the phrase we use with hours - "Il est.. neuf heures" - that's another "impersonal sentence"
And concerning weather: "Il fait chaud", "il fait froid".
- The impersonal sentences are mailnly translated as "it is...".

Manquer - I consulted a dictionary, "il manque" - another "verbe impersonnel".
(it could be either "there is not enough..." or "he hasn't enough...")

and there are also these phrases for "manquer"
- la parole lui manque (~his words fail him, he isn't able to speak)
- la mmoire lui manque (~his memory fails him)
so if I drag the phrase "il me manque" in to these sequence, it could be roughly translated as - "it's him whom I have not enough of" or "I miss him".
Yes, that's a pretty good explanation.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sniffles4Snuffles
And I'm going to France in March so I'd like to know *some things* So first thing, just to refresh my memory a tad--- how are these pronounced-> and ? Not sure if that is the right question, but I always get confused with those two accents in particular and never wrote them correctly...

And thanks for making this brilliant thread!
Your welcome. You might want to check the link I provided in a previous post in this thread about the pronouciation. It contains audio files to help you learn how to say some words and sounds.


__________________

Last edited by Ludivine; December 17th, 2004 at 8:17 am.
Reply With Quote
  #95  
Old December 17th, 2004, 5:27 pm
Sniffles4Snuffles  Female.gif Sniffles4Snuffles is offline
Second Year
 
Joined: 5645 days
Location: Ohio
Age: 30
Posts: 95
Oh thank you muchly. That's excellent


__________________
Reply With Quote
  #96  
Old December 17th, 2004, 7:27 pm
Vance  Female.gif Vance is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 5272 days
Location: United States
Posts: 86
I have a quick question - when telling someone your name is it "Je suis (nom)," or "Je m'appelle (nom)?" In my past French classes I was always told it was je m'appelle, but in my college textbook it says "je suis."

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kehlen Crow
This thing puzzles me: there are adjectives which you put before the noun, and the ones you put after it (e.g. une petite voiture noire).
In one of my French classes we learned a trick called "BAGS." These are adjectives that come before the noun. B is for beauty, A is for age, umm I forgot what G is, and S is for size. Basically any adjectives to do with beauty, age, whatever G is, and size usually goes in front of the noun. It doesn't always work, but it's helpful to at least make an educated guess.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kehlen Crow
For example, new. My dictionary says: - un journal nouveau (new newspaper) but - un nouveau personnage (new person).
Hmmm...I have absolutely no idea how that works. Hopefully, someone more competent than me will see your question.


Reply With Quote
  #97  
Old December 17th, 2004, 9:04 pm
Rikku_Rocks  Male.gif Rikku_Rocks is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 5269 days
Location: United Kingdom
Age: 29
Posts: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ludivine
I'm not really sure of the convention in french. I work evening shifts and I tend to be confused about the time it is so I often say "bonsoir" during the day and "bonjour" during the evening. I think you are supposed to say "bonsoir" when it's getting dark but I'm not sure. We use "bonne nuit" only when going to bed or leaving someone at night.
I'm certain you already know, but I think since they are all contractions (aside from bonne nuit), they're just the same as the conventional phrase, e.g.:

Bonjour - Good day
Bonsoir - Good evening
Bonne nuit - Good night

I'm sure that the practice is pretty flexible. For instance, you could say bonjour to greet a person, and bonsoir for leaving in the evening or early night; bonsoir could still be used to greet someone in the after-noon or evening though, of course. Bonne nuit is - like you said - likely reserved for packing in for the night.


Reply With Quote
  #98  
Old December 17th, 2004, 9:11 pm
Ludivine  Female.gif Ludivine is offline
Fifth Year
 
Joined: 5319 days
Location: Montreal
Age: 40
Posts: 709
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rikku_Rocks
I'm certain you already know, but I think since they are all contractions (aside from bonne nuit), they're just the same as the conventional phrase, e.g.:

Bonjour - Good day
Bonsoir - Good evening
Bonne nuit - Good night

I'm sure that the practice is pretty flexible. For instance, you could say bonjour to greet a person, and bonsoir for leaving in the evening or early night; bonsoir could still be used to greet someone in the after-noon or evening though, of course. Bonne nuit is - like you said - likely reserved for packing in for the night.
Of couse I already know that, french is my first language and it is the one I use everyday. Your answer is almost the same as the one I've given in a earlier post about this question.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vance
I have a quick question - when telling someone your name is it "Je suis (nom)," or "Je m'appelle (nom)?" In my past French classes I was always told it was je m'appelle, but in my college textbook it says "je suis."
You can say both.


__________________
Reply With Quote
  #99  
Old December 17th, 2004, 10:05 pm
Rikku_Rocks  Male.gif Rikku_Rocks is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 5269 days
Location: United Kingdom
Age: 29
Posts: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ludivine
Of couse I already know that, french is my first language and it is the one I use everyday. Your answer is almost the same as the one I've given in a earlier post about this question.
I apologize . . . I didn't mean to come across as patronizing. Please excuse me.


Reply With Quote
  #100  
Old December 18th, 2004, 2:25 am
arabesque1726  Female.gif arabesque1726 is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 5316 days
Age: 32
Posts: 37
Ludivine,
I do not want you to take offense to what I am going to say, and I am only saying it because I believe you said that you want to be a teacher. The way you write is often snippy and condescending. There is a way to be helpful without doing so, but you aren't always doing that. You will lose your students if you speak to them the same way that you write; they will lose their will to learn if you talk down to them.
Once again, I'm saying this only in attempt to be helpful. I've had many teachers in my 18 years, and the best ones treated those that they were teaching as equals rather than subordinates.


Reply With Quote
Reply
Go Back  Chamber of Secrets > Diagon Alley > The Language Lab

Bookmarks

Tags
french


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 3:46 am.


Powered by: vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Original content is Copyright MMII - MMVIII, CoSForums.com. All Rights Reserved.
Other content (posts, images, etc) is Copyright its respective owners.