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The Truth About the Deathly Hallows (March topic, 4/5/08)



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  #1  
Old April 5th, 2008, 8:29 pm
blaqlives  Female.gif blaqlives is offline
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The Truth About the Deathly Hallows (March topic, 4/5/08)

Discussion of The Truth About the Deathly Hallows by Magical Me.


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  #2  
Old April 5th, 2008, 10:33 pm
hpboy13  Male.gif hpboy13 is offline
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Re: The Truth About the Deathly Hallows (March topic, 4/5/08)

I really loved this editorial! You bring up good points, that I agree with. However, there is one that I disagree with, when you say that all masters of the Wand are dead. For one thing, we are led to believe that Gregorovitch was the owner of the Elder Wand (whether he actually earned it in a duel or something else is another story), yet he's alive and kicking over a century later to sell Krum a wand. Which actually brings up an interesting point of whether the Wand ever had allegience to Grindelwald - going by what we know about wand allegience, it shoudln't. Which in turn might explain why Grindelwald was defeated by Dumbledore. Their skills were equal, so if Grindelwald and a far superior wand, he should have won. But if the superior wand wasn't "owned" by him, he'd perform his regular magic (much like Voldemort), and thus allow Dumbledore to defeat him.
Also, you list Dumbledore as one of the masters of the Wand, and poitn out that he's dead like the rest of them. I think it's hardly fair to include him like that. First off, he survived for fifty years as the Wand's owner. Second, when he was killed no one even knew that he had the Wand, so we can't say he was killed because he was Master of it.
But other than that, great editorial!


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Old April 6th, 2008, 3:49 am
inkling7  Female.gif inkling7 is offline
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Re: The Truth About the Deathly Hallows (March topic, 4/5/08)

This editorial while very good was rather similar to the one posted a few weeks ago.

It pointed out that the hallows could be used for good and bad reasons but failed to point out that the cloak in the wrongs hands could be used for evil purposes too. In reality all three hallows could be a curse - the wand could be used to good and bad things - like other wands can - only in more powerful way. The stone could be misued by someone who wanted to communicate with the dead who were evil while alive eg. DE's could use it to communicate with Voldemort and get evil ideas from him. The cloak could not only be used to conceal yourself for good reasons but also evil ones. To spy or be a peeping tom or steal or even kill someone innocently in from of a lot of people (assasination comes to mind also) and nobody would know who did it.

All three hallows have the potential to be used for evil purposes as well as good but the article - like the previous one failed to point this out for the cloak or stone at least.



Last edited by inkling7; April 6th, 2008 at 3:51 am. Reason: fixing some typos
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Old April 6th, 2008, 6:01 pm
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Re: The Truth About the Deathly Hallows (March topic, 4/5/08)

Quote:
But again, Dumbledore, the smartest wizard alive, and possessing the most powerful wand imaginable, could not defeat Voldemort, only force him to retreat.
In my opinion, I don't think Dumbledore intended to finish Voldemort in that duel. DD already knew Voldemort had made several horcruxes. He would have known that trying to kill him would be futile.


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Old April 7th, 2008, 1:53 am
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Re: The Truth About the Deathly Hallows (March topic, 4/5/08)

I felt like you characterized Ron incorrectly in your editorial. Ron is not this selfish competitor who longs to be first in everything. If that were the case, he would not have befriended Harry, because that would mean not being first in many, many things. He has never expressed the longing to be the "best in everything," as you stated. Oh yeah, and would you please find the quote in which Ron states "I want to be the #1 wizard in the Universe." I seemed to have missed it.

Rather, Ron's desire for the wand comes from an insecurity of who he is as a person. He isn't completely sure of himself, unlike Harry and Hermione. He doesn't feel as though there is anything remarkable or extrodinary about him, a feeling that must plague you a lot if you are a member of a family of nine and have best friends like "The Boy who lived," and "The brightest witch of her age." He feels that possesing the Elder wand would give him the self assurance that he wants. You can't go wrong if you're wand is unbeatable. It would make him accident proof. And to him, owining the elder wand would make him worthy of fame in recognition based on his own merits, not because he is Harry Potter's best friend or the Brother of Fred and George Weasley.


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Old April 8th, 2008, 1:28 am
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Re: The Truth About the Deathly Hallows (March topic, 4/5/08)

Oy vey, no editorial is safe from Ron fangirls! As I rmemeber it, the editorial never said that Ron was a selfish competitior - just that he'd like to be #1. And he does want to be the best, which is why he's always so jealous of Harry.


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Old April 8th, 2008, 2:34 am
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Re: The Truth About the Deathly Hallows (March topic, 4/5/08)

Quote:
originally posted by hpboy13
Oy vey, no editorial is safe from Ron fangirls! As I rmemeber it, the editorial never said that Ron was a selfish competitior - just that he'd like to be #1. And he does want to be the best, which is why he's always so jealous of Harry.
Yes, but by the time we learn about the Hallows, (if I remember correctly this was at the Lovegood's right?) Ron has already conquered those insecurities which led him to be jealous of Harry. He is no longer distressed that Harry is more famous, because he has realized that all the things Harry has done sound better then they actually are when you experience them.

I do agree that at one point, Ron did want to be number one. That is what he saw in the Mirror of Erised after all. I think by the point we learn about the Hallows, Ron wanted the wand because he thought it would help him survive the final battle (and help his friends and family survive as well). Ron knew he wasn't powerful enough to guarantee that, so he wanted a powerful wand which would.


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Old April 8th, 2008, 9:58 pm
The_Old_One  Male.gif The_Old_One is offline
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Re: The Truth About the Deathly Hallows (March topic, 4/5/08)

My apologies for what will be a quite long post. I hope it makes sense!

Not to put too fine a point on this, as has been mentioned earlier there was an editorial, and more specifically, many comments on it, that kind of dealt with a lot of this. Having said that, I think you make some good points but I have a few areas where I would disagree. The first is that I don't think we fully understand what the Hallows are at all. There is, of course, the literal meaning and some of the wonderful thinking behind that meaning as expressed so well by you and others. But there is always more to glean, new vistas to explore and we are only just beginning that voyage. Now, insofar as some of your comments and conclusions on the hallows themselves, let's see.

That the Wand might lead to endless battles for its possession is probably a fair conclusion. However, events as described in the book lead me to believe that such challenges will continue even though Harry has replaced the Wand in Dumbledore's grave. After all, he did not have the Wand in his posession at all, yet it recognized him as the true master. It was unwilling to harm him. However, in my view, it would now be even easier for a usurper to steal the Wand, because Harry would not be in a position to use it in his defence (assuming he would want to use it at all). We read in the Tale that the eldest brother loses the Wand because he was incapacitated when he was murdered, and therefore not able to defend himself. The important point is that the Wand was not the instrument of his death, only the causative factor. How much more vulnerable might Harry be with the Wand not even directly accessible? In the interests of safety, might not Harry consider it a good idea to keep the Wand hidden, but accessible, should he need to defend himself? Maybe not, but it is moot, because he has decided to return it to the grave, so he is never tempted to use it, because it is "more trouble" than it is worth, to paraphrase him at the end of DH. So, then, Harry chose to give up the Wand for what are probably good reasons, but the real outcome of his choice is to further establish himself as the Master of the Wand. For what does it really mean to master something? It really means that you are in control of yourself, and do not allow others (whether people or circumstances or objects) to control you. And hpboy, I understand your point, however there is no evidence that Grindelwald used the Wand in his duel with Dumbledore. I can envision him NOT using it, because he understands the significance of the Wand (having quested, and lusted, for the Hallows). Even with the "unbeatable" Wand, he STILL feared Dumbledore, and would not risk it being with him.. just in case. Dumbledore may have retrieved the wand from Grindelwald's possessions AFTER the duel. It is all a gray area at the moment.

Now, what of the Stone? Yes, the Stone does not truly bring back the dead, in a real existence sort of way. But it was even more important to Harry than actually bringing the dead back to him in ANY form. Indeed, he has already done that, and, we can say with some confidence, has learned the dangers in such activity, when he is seduced by the Mirror of Erised. He would have descended into possible madness were it not for Dumbledore's intervention, to explain the dangers to Harry. Yes, Dumbledore removes the Mirror from its location, but Harry is certainly resourceful enough to find it again, if he wanted to. But he listened, and learned. So when the Stone is finally his, he has, to a large degree, already mostly mastered it. Certainly Harry is not seduced very strongly by the lure of it. He already knows the futility. And his desire for it even then was for noble reasons, not for control. But he truly understood what it would be for him when the Ring "opened, at the end" ... that it was HIS end, and that he, Harry, would be, almost, as one of the dead himself, when he could use the Stone. The use wasn't to call them to him, but to have them escort him to them. He mastered the Stone, in the sense I've defined "mastered", above. Its lure was not uncontrollable, at least not for Harry.

And the Cloak? Yes, it was not infallible. If it was not used properly, it would leave a bit of trainer, or an elbow, or something, exposed to eyes that were looking. But this is a direct usage issue, not a motivation. Dumbledore knowing that the Trio was in Hagrid's hut, under the Cloak, in C of S might be explained by his knowing all about the Cloak by then. Remember, Dumbledore borrowed it from James to examine and learn more about it. Already being as much, or more, of an expert as any on the Hallows, and "being cleverer than most men", he would have been able to glean even more about its powers. Perhaps Dumbledore even had an affinity with that Hallow because he was "permitted to keep" one of them already... the Wand.

But you see, I think the point of that Hallow has been missed by many, including myself at first. Yes, when used properly the Cloak provides complete invisibility, but it does not and never has "protected" anyone, in the physical sense, from direct assault. Harry says that the Cloak would not have saved his parents from Voldemort, and Dumbledore agrees. Even though the Trio is under the Cloak, it does not prevent Snargaluff Pods from landing on them, and, indeed, revealing their presence even though they could not be seen for who they were.

The point of the Cloak was made by Xenophilius Lovegood when he explained to Harry the difference between this particular Invisibility Cloak and all others. THIS Cloak could be used to hide, and therefore protect from discovery, OTHERS. It was the selflessness, the sense of love and the need to protect others that made this Cloak so important to Harry. And I would venture a guess that Hermione saw the Cloak not as the Best Hallow, but in fact, as the LEAST dangerous of the Hallows. She, being who she is, would not consider using it for mischief, and it could not MAKE her do mischief the way the other two Hallows could.

But ONLY Harry, because of who he is and what he felt and believed about others, could truly master the Cloak.

He never hesitated, when with others, to include them in his protection, where others would not intuitively necessarily do that. And yes, THIS Hallow is, in fact, the least innocuous, and safest, but Harry STILL did mischief with it (spying and so on), and he even included his friends in the mischief (going to find the Philosopher's Stone, hidden under the Cloak, and coming upon Fluffy), and yet his thought was to protect ALL of them. So, to master THIS Hallow, you HAD to be one such as Harry, with an extraordinary capacity for love and compassion. And one, with such attributes as these, could NEVER be masterd by the Cloak, and would ALWAYS seek the protection of others, whether wearing the Cloak, or not. So, the Cloak could not seduce him to abandon his friends, but then, I believe, Harry had mastered THIS Hallow long before he knew of Hallows, almost by default, because he is who and what he is.

Was this, the Cloak, his ultimate choice of the three Hallows? No. He chose to keep Ignotus' gift, but it was already his, not as a Hallow, but by inheritance, and he was going to keep it, not as a Hallow but for HIS son, and on down the line.

I believe he chose NO Hallow. His ultimate goal was to eliminate them as Hallows at all! The power of the Wand was to be extinguished upon his death, undefeated. The Stone, being lost, and being unknown by all as a Hallow (except Hermione and Ron), would never have the chance to trap another. And the Cloak was his anyway, but always as a special Invisibility Cloak, and not as a Hallow. And I would go further, by saying that once the Wand's power was broken, the whole concept of Hallows would have no meaning, since the Master of Death idea was a direct consequence of possessing all THREE Hallows. THAT, I think, was Harry's ultimate choice ..... NO Horcruxes.... and NO Hallows!

M.



Last edited by The_Old_One; April 8th, 2008 at 10:02 pm.
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Old April 9th, 2008, 12:01 am
Polak  Undisclosed.gif Polak is offline
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Re: The Truth About the Deathly Hallows (March topic, 4/5/08)

A good editorial,
but i do think there are some points of bias.

"The wand itself is not unbeatable....The wand is only a conduit for the magic conjured by the wizard. Also, the wand attracts a great deal of Slytherin types, who are willing to do anything to get power "

It really irks me that everyone has slytherin SO stereotyped. I'll admit that many evil and powery hungry wizards do come from slytherin, but not all slytherins are power-hungry wizards.
Is Draco, in the end, really power hunry ? No .
Would Snape kill for the wand ? In my view point probably not.
In fact - it is DUMBLEDORE, a great gryfindor, who falls into the lure of the wand.
Although he does not go after Grindewald for the purpose of obtainging the wand, he still falls for the possibilities it can create.
Dumbledore himself says that he does not trust himself with power, that is why he did not want to become the Minister of Magic. That (and perhaps his love for Grindewald), got him sucked into some bad beliefs as a young man.

Im a bit tired of Slytherins being seen as all horrible, power-hungry people and always being used as an example of "bad wizards".
Each wizard (and muggle) has good and evil in them... even slytherins have good .... even Dumbledore has evil.


"The Invisibility Cloak is the safest choice."

As another reader pointed out, biased is once again shown here. We all know that this is the Hallow we are "supposed" to chose, and I suppose that is why you decided to disregard the cons of it.
Just because JKR and characters in the story say that it is the "safest" or "correct" choice does not mean we should just accept it and not analize it.
It has the potential for evil as well - it depends on the wizard in control of it.
One could use it for crime, murder, spying, and all sorts of other "bad" things.

As for Ron, I do not think he is selfish. Insecure and tactless ? - yes . But selfish? No. He is always coming to the aid of Harry, puts his life in danger for him and Hermione, and loves them dearly.
I dont think his mistake in leaving the trio, while under the effect of the horcrux i may add, should forever taints peoples view on him.
We are all human and make our mistakes - including Ron.
He should not be called selfish for that.

And now for Hermione. I do not think, that like you stated, she is AFRIAD of the stone, but rather she is able to see the consequences it can cause. Yes, she does think it is unnatural, but she does not base her decision on that. We need to give her more credit. She bases it on the facts, not on her fears.


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Old April 10th, 2008, 12:59 am
e_nigma  Undisclosed.gif e_nigma is offline
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Re: The Truth About the Deathly Hallows (March topic, 4/5/08)

So in a desperate attempt to maintain my pride I'm going to attempt to justify the points that the readers have brought up. I will go ahead and say the majority of it has to do with my own weird flavor of sarcasm.

Many people have brought up what I wrote about Ron... I believe the following segment is the controversial one:

Quote:
Ron, who above all else wants to win at everything he does (whether it's for family approval, the spotlight, Hermione's affection, or completely selfish reasons like being the #1 wizard in the universe is for another article)
I did not mean to say that Ron was selfish. or that he was insecure. the only thing I meant by the statement was that Ron is a deep character and a person can interpret his actions in a number of ways. Personally I think he is a mixture of all of the above , but it would be great to see an editorial on an analysis of his motives.

<b>Another little piece of controversy is the part referring to the wand attracting a great deal of slytherin types. </b>
Quote:
the wand attracts a great deal of Slytherin types, who are willing to do anything to get power.
I totally afree with what everyone is saying, Not all Slytherins are evil, not all Slytherins will kill someone for a stronger wand. I don't think Slughorn, Snape, or even Draco would kill for it. And I'm sure alot of the wizarding world would want that wand, Slytherin or not. But I think it is safe to say the majority of the people that would Duel Harry to the Death over the wand would at the very least have what most would call Slytherin attributes. Yes, Dumbledore did get the wand. yes he wanted the wand so he could become the master of death. But he admits his flaws. He only takes the wand now in order to keep it out of circulation. He doesn't even trust himself with it. As he tells Harry, he is not worthy of the Hallows.

Hermione being afraid of the stone. I think it is mentioned somewhere in the books that Hermione was afraid of the dead, or atleast the idea of the dead walking around. (she has good reason, Zombies eat brains!)


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Old April 10th, 2008, 1:31 am
DobbysDa  Undisclosed.gif DobbysDa is offline
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Re: The Truth About the Deathly Hallows (March topic, 4/5/08)

For me, the "Master of Death" thing simply doesn't work.

OK: Harry unites The Three for the first time since Death put them into the World, making himself the one and only Master of Death that ever was!

Huh?

Harry is neither the first nor the last Wizard, Witch or Muggle to overcome the fear of death, or to sacrifice him/herself in a good cause. Nor was ownership of The Three either necessary or sufficient to bring him to face Voldemort and (so far as he knows) certain death.

Even if a MOD must die both in a good cause and in absolutely cold blood, so that Dumbledore doesn't qualify as an MOD because although fearless, he isn't totally calm when he dies, and Lily doesn't qualify for similar reasons -- Harry isn't unique in that either. We've already been told that Nicholas and Perenelle Flamel decided "it was all for the best" that they (at Dumbledore's suggestion) destroy the Sorcerer's Stone, dying themselves, but keeping Lord V dead -- for the moment.

So why is Harry THE Master of Death? And why does the title matter ? Are we to believe that possession of The Three his ticket to King's Cross Station? Wasn't that that because Harry's blood in Voldemort's (new) body was Harry's anchor to Life -- a sort of murder-free horicrux?

For my money, Jo could have named the 7th book "The Seventh Horcrux," left the Three McGuffins as useful magical artifacts, and not tied herself (and us) in metaphysical knots.


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Old April 10th, 2008, 2:11 am
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Re: The Truth About the Deathly Hallows (March topic, 4/5/08)

Quote:
originally posted by e_nigma
I did not mean to say that Ron was selfish. or that he was insecure. the only thing I meant by the statement was that Ron is a deep character and a person can interpret his actions in a number of ways. Personally I think he is a mixture of all of the above , but it would be great to see an editorial on an analysis of his motives.
I think what we disagree with is the phrasing. By saying Ron always wants to win, it makes it sound as though he is a selfish competitor. I don't disagree that Ron is insecure and that he wanted to distinguish himself above his brothers, but I do disagree that his desire for the wand was purely an "With this wand I can win" deal. Ron saw the wand as the most powerful protection. It was couldn't be defeated, so with it, he could help Harry best Voldemort and keep all his friends and family alive.

Really, I think the desire for each horcrux is united on the theme of protection. Ron saw the power of an unbeatable wand as protection. Hermione saw the invisibility cloak as protection, it was familar and she already knew it would be useful as such. Harry saw the stone as protection because those who had died were his greatest protectors. With the stone, he could get advice from Dumbledore and advice from his parents. It was the best protection he could think of.

Quote:
originally posted by DobbysDa
So why is Harry THE Master of Death? And why does the title matter ? Are we to believe that possession of The Three his ticket to King's Cross Station? Wasn't that that because Harry's blood in Voldemort's (new) body was Harry's anchor to Life -- a sort of murder-free horicrux?
The Master of Death thing is, IMO, mostly part of the legend of the Hallows. Harry is certainly not the fist wizard to not fear death. But he is the first (or one of the few wizards) who could possess all three Hallows at one time and not be tempted to use them for mischief. Harry was not seduced by the power of the wand, driven mad by the stone, nor using the cloak for selfish means (at least not at the end). Master of Death more likely means Master of the Hallows. Owning all three does not mean Harry can't die, it simply means he is in control of them and that he isn't seduced by power.


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Old April 10th, 2008, 4:40 am
hpboy13  Male.gif hpboy13 is offline
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Re: The Truth About the Deathly Hallows (March topic, 4/5/08)

Quote:
I do agree that at one point, Ron did want to be number one. That is what he saw in the Mirror of Erised after all. I think by the point we learn about the Hallows, Ron wanted the wand because he thought it would help him survive the final battle (and help his friends and family survive as well). Ron knew he wasn't powerful enough to guarantee that, so he wanted a powerful wand which would.
Nope, not so! You can't excuse this one that easily. If Ron only wanted the wand to survive the Final Battle, why did he moan when Harry destroyed it?

Quote:
And hpboy, I understand your point, however there is no evidence that Grindelwald used the Wand in his duel with Dumbledore. I can envision him NOT using it, because he understands the significance of the Wand (having quested, and lusted, for the Hallows). Even with the "unbeatable" Wand, he STILL feared Dumbledore, and would not risk it being with him.. just in case. Dumbledore may have retrieved the wand from Grindelwald's possessions AFTER the duel. It is all a gray area at the moment.
On the contrary, since Grindelwald still feared DD, he WOULD use the Wand in the hopes that it would give him an edge in the battle. I doubt he'd be concerned abotu it fallign into DD's hands if he lost - if he lost, then what ddi he care what happened to the wand? Villains aren't like DD, they don't care about furthering their cause if they aren't there to lead it (this was wonderfully expressed in the first X-Men movie: Magneto wants to sacrifice Rogue for the cause, and Wolverine tells him he's full of s*** because he should just sacrifice himself them).

Polak, I view the Slytherin types as more of a quick characterization than bias. It would be bias to say Slytherins. But since Slytherin types by definition are very ambitious, it would attract a lot of Slytherin types.

Quote:
And now for Hermione. I do not think, that like you stated, she is AFRIAD of the stone, but rather she is able to see the consequences it can cause. Yes, she does think it is unnatural, but she does not base her decision on that. We need to give her more credit. She bases it on the facts, not on her fears.
Actually, there is evidence that Hermione fears it - she is generally disquieted by things dealing with death and the beyond. Bring to mind her reaction to the Veil in Book 5 - it really freaked her out, she kept urging Harry to go.

Anyway, I hope I've helped you out a little, e_nigma! I know what it's like to be on the unpopular end of a debate!


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Old April 10th, 2008, 4:44 pm
e_nigma  Undisclosed.gif e_nigma is offline
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Re: The Truth About the Deathly Hallows (March topic, 4/5/08)

Quote:
Anyway, I hope I've helped you out a little, e_nigma! I know what it's like to be on the unpopular end of a debate!
I appreciate the backup. I encourage conversation, argument, and debate. But its nice to know someone else understands my side of it.


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Old April 10th, 2008, 6:56 pm
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Re: The Truth About the Deathly Hallows (March topic, 4/5/08)

Quote:
Originally Posted by hpboy13 View Post
On the contrary, since Grindelwald still feared DD, he WOULD use the Wand in the hopes that it would give him an edge in the battle. I doubt he'd be concerned abotu it fallign into DD's hands if he lost - if he lost, then what ddi he care what happened to the wand? Villains aren't like DD, they don't care about furthering their cause if they aren't there to lead it (this was wonderfully expressed in the first X-Men movie: Magneto wants to sacrifice Rogue for the cause, and Wolverine tells him he's full of s*** because he should just sacrifice himself them).
Again, I see this certainly as a possibility, hpboy, but as I concluded the other day, since we really have no evidence, it is a gray area. In any case, whichever way it was, it is less relevant to the point I was making, which is related to Harry's choice regarding the wand, and whether we truly understand what the Hallows are.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hpboy13 View Post
Anyway, I hope I've helped you out a little, e_nigma! I know what it's like to be on the unpopular end of a debate!
Now, hpboy... you? Unpopular? I won't hear of it! Let me just make this statement and then I'll shut up (or duck, whichever seems more appropriate!!) ... I truly believe that most people do not dislike anyone here. I think that when one writes something that is controversial or, perhaps, seems to buck the prevailing opinion, it generates emotional responses, which can sometimes appear to be "dislike". I have learned, over many years, to try and ignore the emotion in a response (especially an electronic or otherwise written one, where you cannot look the responder in the eye and see that it is a matter of importance to them and not a question of dislike or distaste), because it is the content and context that dictates my interpretation of the response.

You, and enigma, and many others) have written editorials that seem to generate emotional responses. But more importantly, as you have both previously noted, you generate response... i.e. discussion. So good for both of you and all the others who have done that.

Just a thought... isn't that one of the real values created by the HP series? That is has nudged people into discussing, where once there was silence, and into reading where once there was nothing but TV and video games? Aren't you doing the same thing?

M.


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  #16  
Old April 11th, 2008, 1:33 am
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dweaselqueen  Female.gif dweaselqueen is offline
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Re: The Truth About the Deathly Hallows (March topic, 4/5/08)

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originally posted by hpboy13
Nope, not so! You can't excuse this one that easily. If Ron only wanted the wand to survive the Final Battle, why did he moan when Harry destroyed it?
Did Harry destroy the wand or did he just put it back with Dumbledore? I can't remember....

Anyways, that's really not the point, I just wanted to clear my memory on that. So on to your point: Yes, Ron did moan when Harry decided not to keep the wand (destroyed it, whatever happened ). I don't deny that Ron wanted the wand. However, just because Voldemort was defeated did not mean the danger was entirely over. And while they may not be even thinking along those lines at that point, I think that Ron's moan was to show how incredible it is that Harry is not seduced by the power of the wand. Dumbledore, Grindelwald, Voldemort and Ron are like most wizards, and they are intrigued by the power it brings, so seeing Harry not keep it is like a crime in Ron's book. Who is going to throw away the most powerful wand in the universe?

Still, just because Ron was intrigued by the power of the wand does not make him inherently selfish or bad. Dumbledore said he didn't trust himself with power either, and we know him to be the greatest wizard of the age.


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  #17  
Old April 11th, 2008, 4:49 am
hpboy13  Male.gif hpboy13 is offline
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Re: The Truth About the Deathly Hallows (March topic, 4/5/08)

Quote:
Now, hpboy... you? Unpopular? I won't hear of it! Let me just make this statement and then I'll shut up (or duck, whichever seems more appropriate!!) ... I truly believe that most people do not dislike anyone here. I think that when one writes something that is controversial or, perhaps, seems to buck the prevailing opinion, it generates emotional responses, which can sometimes appear to be "dislike". I have learned, over many years, to try and ignore the emotion in a response (especially an electronic or otherwise written one, where you cannot look the responder in the eye and see that it is a matter of importance to them and not a question of dislike or distaste), because it is the content and context that dictates my interpretation of the response.
Oh, I wouldn't hear of me being unpopular either! I was referring to supporting the unpopular viewpoint in a debate, which I'm sure most of you will attest I have done!

Quote:
Just a thought... isn't that one of the real values created by the HP series? That is has nudged people into discussing, where once there was silence, and into reading where once there was nothing but TV and video games? Aren't you doing the same thing?
You know, I really like that! It makes me feel really good about myself, so thanks, lol! I concur that this is what separates HP from the other fandoms - that here there are limitless things to discuss, and people tear themselves away from the TV to read. I'll be honest, recently HP is just about the only thing that I've actually sat down at home to read in favor of doing something else. Usually, I just read on the subway to and from school and other various car rides. Not that that doesn't give me sufficient time to read a lot, but HP is the only thing where I drop all else to read it.

dweaselqueen, being intrigued by ti is one thing. However, after seeing everything said and done concerning the Elder Wand, I doubt that people would want it. Notice that Hermione doesn't moan or anything, she's seen the horrors associated with that wand. And I doubt there was any sort of immediate danger that they couldn't handle with their regualr wands. Oh, and by the way, Harry does destroy it I believe.


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  #18  
Old April 11th, 2008, 5:56 am
inkling7  Female.gif inkling7 is offline
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Re: The Truth About the Deathly Hallows (March topic, 4/5/08)

No he put it back in Albus grave I believe saying that the wand would lose it's power when Harry died a natural death. Of course only the headmaster's portraits, Ron and Hermione (and possibly Ginny) knew this. I doubt whether anyone else would need to be told since someone evil might find out try and steal the wand and kill Harry to become the master of it. It's all on the last page of the chapter before the Epilogue.


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Old April 11th, 2008, 2:53 pm
e_nigma  Undisclosed.gif e_nigma is offline
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Re: The Truth About the Deathly Hallows (March topic, 4/5/08)

Yea Harry left the wand in Dumbledore's tomb. Saying it would loose ownership if he could die a natural death, without someone taking it from him. Or atleast that is his theory.

This raises an interesting point though. A point that was not discussed in my editorial. What of the future of the hallows? The Cloak, I am sure, will get some more use out of the Auror Harry and company.

THe wand however is just sitting in the tomb. We are all fishy on the subject of wand ownership, but if someone steals the wand from the tomb, they would be really taking it away from harry, as he put it there for safe keeping. Possibly meaning they would become the new owner. Plus I can see there being a good reason for Harry to go back and grab the wand to use it to repair some serious dark magic that he encounters as an Auror (it would make for a great plot point).

And then there is a stone. Laying in the forrest. Most likely this is lost forever. I doubt anyone will notice a single stone laying in the forbidden forrest. THe Centaurs might find it and recognize it for what it is, and then spend the rest of the their lives preventing it from reaching the public.

I Think the hallows would make for interesting points of interest, if anyone ever wrote about the next generation.


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  #20  
Old April 11th, 2008, 5:34 pm
inkling7  Female.gif inkling7 is offline
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Re: The Truth About the Deathly Hallows (March topic, 4/5/08)

Actually I rather like the idea of the Centaurs finding the Stone and guarding it against future evil. That works for me since the Centaurs wouldn't be interested in the power of the Stone.


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