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The Potion Dumbledore Drank - Clearly Not Green



 
 
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Old December 3rd, 2005, 10:24 am
Cryoz  Undisclosed.gif Cryoz is offline
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The Potion Dumbledore Drank - Clearly Not Green

Two months ago, I wrote a short editorial about the potion that Dumbledore drank in the cave. I had sent it to Mugglenet, but I'm afraid it was rejected. Probably because it wasn't very well-written, but I don't really have time to go over it and besides, I'm not a native English speaker. I wrote this editorial because I'd thought that I was on to something, and I still do. So without further ado, here it is:

The introduction to new potions has always been a tradition in the Harry Potter series. In Chamber of Secrets, we were first introduced to the Polyjuice Potion, who later in the series was followed by the Wolfsbane Potion, the Veritaserum an so on. Traditionally, we were introduced to a variety of new potions in the sixth book as well, though in a much vaster way than in the past books. In Half-Blood Prince, potions played a relatively major role, a fact that highly raised my suspicion. Knowing Rowling's style, many details which may prove significant in future books, are always hidden between the lines and are often obscured by events that are more significant to the present book plot. We've seen this, for example, when Lupin mentioned Scrimgeour absent-mindedly in the fifth book and when Harry talked to the boa constrictor in the first book. The vast use of potions in the plot made me think that Rowling, among the extravagant assortment, tried to hide a potion which is extremely crucial to the plot. So I sat and wondered, what potion, out of the many ones to which we were introduced, is the one that will ultimately affect the plot, and do justice to the potions themselves as an inseparable part of J.K. Rowling's world?
A brief search between some of the potions may find us some clues. Could it be the Amortentia potion? The Amortentia clearly symbolizes an important theme in the HP books - love. But what is the scale of the love that this potion contains in relation to the strong true love that we were presented to when Lily Potter sacrificed herself for her son? Can it really be the one potion we're looking for? Or is it another potion? Other potions we came across that may fit for the role are the Polyjuice potion and the Felix Felicis. Them both represent important themes - luck and metamorphosis, but are these two themes pillars in the plot? After being used many times in the past, will these potions surprise us, and result in a twist in the main plot? Logic dictates that the potion I'm looking for is a potion that we've already been introduced to, but in a minor way. In a way that will make its final appearance surprising and unexpected, and yet unmistakably logical. The potion we're looking for is a potion so mysterious we don't even know its name and effects, or so it initially seems. The potion I was looking after is located in the cave where the locket Horcrux was hidden, the cave to which Harry and Dumbledore entered in their last journey together. I think I have the solution to the potion mystery, and in this editorial I will take you thorugh the course I'd taken in the way to uncover the mystery.
The first step we must take is to collect all the facts available about the mysterious potion in the cave. The only way to find something that's hidden beneath the rock is to first locate the rock. Let's take a glance at the properties of the potion I managed to collect from chapter twenty-six:
- This potion's surface had a phosphorescent emerlad glow.
- There was something hidden beneath this potion.
- Physical contact with this potion was forbidden.
- The intruder was forced to drink this potion.
- This potion weakens its drinker.
I'm sure these properties seem obvious to you as they did to me too. It was only later when I found out how significant they were, and how misleading. The mysterious potion I looked for, the potion I thought Rowling was hiding, did possess all these properties, but there was a distracting factor, a disguise.
Let's have a more intensive look at the emerald potion in the cave according to the aforementioned properties: This potion did have a phosporescent emerald glow, and there was something hidden beneath it, an object - the locket Horcrux. Touching it was forbidden - by a barrier of inflexible air, and as there was no other way to extract the Horcrux the trespasser, in our case Dumbledore, was forced to drink the potion. After drinking it, the potion greatly weakened Dumbledore, making him hallucinate and see frightening visions. All of the facts that I mentioned all had seemed outright and direct to me, except for one. There was something more to what the potion did to Dumbledore, something that may indicate its possible real purpose:
Following its effect on Dumbledore, the potion first made him see things, things that made him collapse, shout, and cry. The potion probably made Dumbledore see things that he feared of, things that Dumbledore couldn't bear seeing. He pleaded with Harry to make it stop, and with every gulp, his reactions became more critical, until he finally pleads with Harry to commit something terrible. He pleads with him to kill him. This was such a strong moment to behold, I almost ignored what the potion made Dumbledore do afterwards, its ultimate effect:
"'Water,' croaked Dumbledore." - HBP, British edition, page 536
Dumbledore asks for water. Of course, Dumbledore was for a moment unconscious, and we all deduced that he asked for water like every human being that is physically weak. But look at what happen afterwards, when Harry fills the crystal goblet with water from his wand. As the water approached Dumbledore's mouth it vanished. Why did that happen? There was a reason. It happened because Voldemort had wanted it to happen. It was all planned in advance. Voldemort wanted the intruder to drink water specifically from the lake. He has done so by making the intruder drink the green potion, who would arouse in him the need to drink water. And why is that? Why was it so important for Voldemort that the intruder would drink water from the lake and not from any other source? The answer to this question seems obvious at first. Voldemort wanted the trespasser to wake up the Inferi in the water. The Inferi would then take him into the water and drown him.
Or would they? The Inferi did attack Harry, but did they attack Dumbledore too? Did they try to take him down along with Harry? Remember what Dumbledore said in the cave beforehand:
"'...[Voldemort] would not want immediately to kill the person who reached this island,' Dumbledore corrected himself. 'He would want to keep them alive long enough to find out how they managed to penetrate so far through his defences...'" - HBP, British edition, page 532
Dumbledore said that Voldemort wouldn't want to kill the intruder immediately, but keep him alive long enough to find out how he managed to go through the obstacles he'd set in the cave. Then why would he want him to drink from the water? If the Inferi's purpose is to kill, and Voldemort, according to Dumbledore, which was most likely right, would not want to kill the trespasser immediately, then what purpose would drinking water specifically from the lake serve? At that point I remembered something vague about the water and reread the cave scene. While I was rereading, I spotted what I looked for, a few lines that made me even more suspicious. When Harry and Dumbledore entered the cave, J.K. Rowling described strange occurences. Occurences that imply that something isn't right with the water:
"Harry looked back at the water. The surface of the lake was once more shining black glass: the ripples had vanished unnaturally fast;" - HBP, British edition, page 525
"Harry gasped as the ghostly prow of a tiny boat broke the surface, glowing as green as the chain, and floated, with barely a ripple, towards the place on the bank where Harry and Dumbledore stood." - page 526
Why did the ripples vanish unnaturally fast? Rowling shows us that something about the water in the lake is abnormal, unnatural. But what is it? Is it something important or just a negligible piece of information? Did Rowling try to impart us a hint that if we look more closely we can find the answer hidden somewhere?
Let's go back to an earlier part of the book, Slughorn's first lesson. It was in Slughorn's lesson that we learned about new potions and revisited old ones. Slughorn showed the Veritaserum, the Polyjuice Potion, the Amortentia, and last but not least - the Felix Felicis. All the potions were really interesting but it was the Felix Felicis which drew the class's real attention. Furthermore, as a treat for the first Potions lesson of the new year, Slughorn conducted a competition in which the students had to concoct a potion. The one whose potion was best concocted would win a Felix Felicis vial containing twelve-hours luck.
Again, so many potions in one lesson. Did Rowling try to obscure something? There is one potion that was introduced in Slughorn's lesson that drew my attention most, and it was the one that I'd hardly noticed when I had first been reading the book. And yet, its connection to the potion in the cave was not visible. Not until one small piece of information caught my eye. A small and seemingly negligible piece of information that was given while Harry was making the potion in Slughorn's lesson. Here we get the solution (literally) to the potion mystery, the final piece of the jigsaw:
"His annoyance with the previous owner vanishing on the spot, Harry now squinted at the next line of instructions. According to the book, he had to stir counter-clockwise until the potion turned clear as water." - HBP, British edition, pages 180-181
Harry had to stir counter-clockwise until he would achieve the final product, a potion clear as water. So what was wrong with the water in the cave? Nothing, except that it wasn't water at all. The lake in the cave was not filled with water, but with a potion, the same potion Harry had to make in Slughorn's first lesson in order to win the Felix Felicis. And what was this potion? For those of you who don't remember, this is a potion that was mentioned long ago, in the first book, by none other than the Potions Master himself, Severus Snape:
"'For your information, Potter, asphodel and wormwood make a sleeping potion so powerful it is known as the Draught of Living Death.'" - PS, British edition, page 103
All the aforementioned facts lead to the conclusion that the potion that Dumbledore drank in the cave that had the ultimate effect on him was the Draught of Living Death, an extremely strong sleeping potion, according to Snape.
But what is the logic behind it? Why did Voldemort fill an entire lake in the cave with a sleeping potion? The answer to this question lies in another question we asked ourselves previously. How would Voldemort keep the intruder alive long enough to find out how he penetrated through his defenses? Now that we know about the potion, the answer is simple. Voldemort would make the intruder drink a sleeping potion, thus making him sleep until he finds him, wakes him up and finds out how. And how would he make the intruder drink the Draught of Living Death in the cave? By making him drink another potion, the emerald potion.
The emerlad potion in the basin was the disguise. J.K. Rowling used the emerald potion's properties to hide the "water", the Draught of Living Death, by making them similar to the latter's: The Draught of Living Death's surface did have a green glow, as the glow emitted by the emerlad potion was reflected in it. There was something hidden in the Draught of Living Death - Inferi, the Living Dead. Touching it was also forbidden - by Dumbledore himself. Dumbledore was forced to drink the Draught from the lake, inasmuch as the green potion fulfilled its real purpose and aroused the need to drink water in Dumbledore, and becuase no other source of water was available. The Draught weakened Dumbledore, made him drowsy, and slowly exhausted him until he would fall into a deep long sleep.
Furthermore, what makes my belief in this conclusion even greater is that Rowling keeps relating Dumbledore to sleeping, and while describing him in the events that follow his and Harry's departure from the cave, she carefully chooses words that imply that Dumbledore might be sleeping, even after his supposed death:
"Dumbledore closed his eyes again and nodded, as though he was about to fall asleep." - HBP, British Edition, page 550
"'Think your little jokes'll help you on your death bed, then?'" - page 553
"Dumbledore's eyes were closed; but for the strange angle of his arms and legs, he might have been sleeping." - page 568 (also notice his eyes were closed as opposed to Cedric whose eyes were empty and blank like "the windows of a deserted house").
"And a new portrait had joined the ranks of the dead headmasters and headmistresses of Hogwarts ... Dumbledore was slumbering in a golden frame over the desk," - page 584
"In its place was a white marble tomb, encasing Dumbledore's body and the table on which he had rested." - page 601
All these implications may foreshadow what's in store for the devoted Hogwarts headmaster. Although I'm sure many of you are convinced that he's dead, and are past the "denial phase", I'd like to remind you that it is not the purpose of this editorial to determine Dumbledore's fate. I am merely following facts which I find enormously significant. However, hiding such a fact so brilliantly and meticulously, and having it worth nothing later by killing Dumbledore seems completely redundant. Not to mention the fact that there are implications of Dumbledore being asleep, even after he's supposedly dead.
Let's assume for a moment that Dumbledore is not dead, that Snape didn't really use the Avada Kedavra, but just spoke the incantation and cast another non-verbal spell instead, that what Snape did was satisfactory according to the Unbreakable Vow (remember Narcissa's last line of the Vow - "and should it prove necessary" - what if it wasn't? what if there was another way and it was unnecessary to kill Dumbledore?), that Dumbledore somehow survived the fall from the Astronomy Tower, that he or Snape cast some spell that slowed down the fall when "for a split second he seemed to hang suspended beneath the shining skull", that the locket was not opened by the force of the fall but by Dumbledore, that Fawkes's song was not a lament but a call for help to wake up Dumbledore, which was not given so he went to seek after it somewhere else, and that Dumbledore is now sleeping in his tomb. What is going to happen to him now? I think that one of the big questions is what is the exact effect of the Draught of Living Death, and how can it be undone. In my opinion, the Draught of Living Death puts its drinker into an eternal sleep. An everlasting unceasing sleep that can only be undone by another potion, an antidote. My prediction is that if the assumption that Dumbledore is alive is true, he will be awoken by an antidote made by Snape. There is still a possibility that Dumbledore is indeed dead, though very slight in my opinion, but the possibility that Dumbledore is in his tomb, sleeping a long and presumably eternal sleep after unknowingly drinking the Draught of Living Death, without anyone we know of knowing about it yet, seems plausible to me all the same.
In conclusion, I think that we can all be assured that the potion that ultimately weakened Dumbledore in the cave was not the emerald potion but the Draught of Living Death, which was so cunningly and cleverly disguised as water by J.K. Rowling. Now we all know what is the potion that is so crucial to the future plot and the final book. It does not resemble love, luck or truth, but another component of the plot which affects it greatly - death. It resembles death, or to be more accurate the feigning of death. Dumbledore is one of the most beloved characters in the Harry Potter novels, but beyond loving him, beyond feeling affection towards that specific character, it will be great to witness J.K. Rowling artisitically merging the slight difference between deep sleep and death and its enormous consequences into the final book's plot, by her own innovative and creative means.


That's it.
BTW, since I wrote the editorial I've been reminded of other quotes from the book that may serve clues of Dumbledore falling asleep by the end of the book:
If you read carefully, you would notice that as the plot of book 6 advances, Dumbledore becomes steadily more and more tired:
'There sat Dumbledore, looking unusually tired;' - HBP UK, p.242
''Please close the door and sit down, Harry,' said Dumbledore, sounding rather tired.' - p.399
'[Dumbledore] sounded exhausted.' - p.461
What would you expect of a tired person to do eventually?
- Dumbledore and Harry always meet at night in HBP. And Dumbledore, in the end of almost every meeting, says 'Goodnight, Harry.' Could this say something about the end of their last meeting?
- In the last chapter "The White Tomb", Dumbledore's body body was "wrapped in purple velvet spangled with golden stars". Could this be an allusion to a nightgown?

What do you think?



Last edited by Cryoz; December 4th, 2005 at 6:18 pm.
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  #2  
Old December 3rd, 2005, 10:45 am
Mike_Grawp  Male.gif Mike_Grawp is offline
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Re: The Potion Dumbledore Drank - Clearly Not Green

Oh...my...God. That is one of the most brilliant theorys i have ever seen. It covers all the bases, and supports ** being alive!! I would be completely amazed if this point wasn't addressed or resolved in book 7. Its absolutly brialliantly thought out.

All i can say is wow. I don't even have anything that could disporove it. =D


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  #3  
Old December 3rd, 2005, 10:50 am
Cryoz  Undisclosed.gif Cryoz is offline
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Re: The Potion Dumbledore Drank - Clearly Not Green

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike_Grawp
Oh...my...God. That is one of the most brilliant theorys i have ever seen. It covers all the bases, and supports ** being alive!! I would be completely amazed if this point wasn't addressed or resolved in book 7. Its absolutly brialliantly thought out.

All i can say is wow. I don't even have anything that could disporove it. =D
Thanks. I've had this theory in my mind for quite a long time, and I felt I ought to let you, devoted HP community, know about it.


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Old December 3rd, 2005, 3:02 pm
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Re: The Potion Dumbledore Drank - Clearly Not Green

You might want to check out these already open threads:

All about the potion in the basin that Dumbledore drank
Did the green glow of the potion mean death?

Please do a "Search" before opening a new thread. Duplicate threads use unnecessary server space here and confuse many people. If you need help learning how to Search, please use the Tutorial link in my signature.


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Old December 3rd, 2005, 3:31 pm
MoonCrystal  Female.gif MoonCrystal is offline
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Re: The Potion Dumbledore Drank - Clearly Not Green

WOW - this is really one of the best theories here, great done...
words fail me right now so just wow, amazing and thanks for giving back hope to those of us who still hope ** alive ;o)


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Old December 3rd, 2005, 3:33 pm
Albus_Merlin  Male.gif Albus_Merlin is offline
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Re: The Potion Dumbledore Drank - Clearly Not Green

Wow great theory!!! It is hard to find any loopholes in your theory. But if according to you Dumbledore is sleeping in his tomb after taking the Draught of living dead then why was there a sudden flash of fire and a phoenix like shape going out of it at Dumbledore's funeral? Doesn't that suggest that Dumbledore is dead.(Coz a phoenix symbolizes Dumbledore) so doesn't that mean he has not taken the Draugt of living dead?


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Old December 3rd, 2005, 3:55 pm
Cryoz  Undisclosed.gif Cryoz is offline
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Re: The Potion Dumbledore Drank - Clearly Not Green

Quote:
Originally Posted by Albus_Merlin
Wow great theory!!! It is hard to find any loopholes in your theory. But if according to you Dumbledore is sleeping in his tomb after taking the Draught of living dead then why was there a sudden flash of fire and a phoenix like shape going out of it at Dumbledore's funeral? Doesn't that suggest that Dumbledore is dead.(Coz a phoenix symbolizes Dumbledore) so doesn't that mean he has not taken the Draugt of living dead?
Why does smoke in the shape of a phoenix suggests that Dumbledore is dead? On the contrary, the phoenix symbolizes ressurection after death (which emphasizes the possibility the Dumbledore is still alive.) Some even say it's Dumbledore's Patronus, though I doubt it.


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Old December 3rd, 2005, 4:17 pm
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Re: The Potion Dumbledore Drank - Clearly Not Green

MODS before you close this. It should be renamed: "The truth about the lake in Voldemorts cave" because that is the actual theme of this editorial. It need not be closed.


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Old December 3rd, 2005, 4:19 pm
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Re: The Potion Dumbledore Drank - Clearly Not Green

Quote:
Originally Posted by SageThyme
You might want to check out these already open threads:

All about the potion in the basin that Dumbledore drank
Did the green glow of the potion mean death?

Please do a "Search" before opening a new thread. Duplicate threads use unnecessary server space here and confuse many people. If you need help learning how to Search, please use the Tutorial link in my signature.
I wonder if you have read this editorial? It is actually about the water in the lake and not the potion in the basin. It should be re-named.


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Old December 3rd, 2005, 9:57 pm
Cryoz  Undisclosed.gif Cryoz is offline
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Re: The Potion Dumbledore Drank - Clearly Not Green

Quote:
Originally Posted by gualsa
MODS before you close this. It should be renamed: "The truth about the lake in Voldemorts cave" because that is the actual theme of this editorial. It need not be closed.
Thanks for notifying me gualsa. Jessica has kindly moved back my theory to a thread of its own.


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Old December 3rd, 2005, 10:34 pm
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Re: Theories about the Lake in Voldemort's Cave

I think your theory is amazing, very well worked out, and of course I had been wanting some way for Dumbledore to still be alive. However, while re-reading to see if I could find out anything else about the properties of the Draught of Living Death, I noticed something in HBP Ch. 9 when Harry is making the potion. While the instructions do state that the potion should turn "as clear as water" the last color that Harry's potion is described as is "palest pink" HBP p190 American version. It is possible that with his further stirring the potion turned completely clear, or that Harry's potion was imperfect. But it is also possible that "as clear as water" only refers to the potion's translucence, and not its color. Draught of Living Death could possibly be completely translucent, like water, but with a pink hue to it.

Also, in the same chapter, the veritaserum is described as "what looked like plain water" HBP p.184 American version.
Quote:
"'...[Voldemort] would not want immediately to kill the person who reached this island,' Dumbledore corrected himself. 'He would want to keep them alive long enough to find out how they managed to penetrate so far through his defences...'"
Perhaps Voldemort wanted the person who reached the island to be forced to drink out of the lake if it were veritaserum so that they would tell the truth when he asked them how they had gotten so far...
I know that this is not as well thought out as your grand theory, these are just my reactions as a naturally skeptical person.


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  #12  
Old December 3rd, 2005, 10:43 pm
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Re: Theories about the Lake in Voldemort's Cave

This is an Excellent theory seeing as how i never thought Dumbledore was dead..you're really smart because i would have never of anything like that. It makes alot of sense as to why Dumbledore couldn't drink water from harry's wand and why Snapes ** curse affected Dumbledore differently than the way it affected others-good job, i hope your right about this.


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  #13  
Old December 3rd, 2005, 10:49 pm
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Re: Theories about the Lake in Voldemort's Cave

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoGryffindor31
I think your theory is amazing, very well worked out, and of course I had been wanting some way for Dumbledore to still be alive. However, while re-reading to see if I could find out anything else about the properties of the Draught of Living Death, I noticed something in HBP Ch. 9 when Harry is making the potion. While the instructions do state that the potion should turn "as clear as water" the last color that Harry's potion is described as is "palest pink" HBP p190 American version. It is possible that with his further stirring the potion turned completely clear, or that Harry's potion was imperfect. But it is also possible that "as clear as water" only refers to the potion's translucence, and not its color. Draught of Living Death could possibly be completely translucent, like water, but with a pink hue to it.

Also, in the same chapter, the veritaserum is described as "what looked like plain water" HBP p.184 American version.



Perhaps Voldemort wanted the person who reached the island to be forced to drink out of the lake if it were veritaserum so that they would tell the truth when he asked them how they had gotten so far...
I know that this is not as well thought out as your grand theory, these are just my reactions as a naturally skeptical person.
WoW! that could be true too! omg yall are really smart - now i dont know what to think. veritaserum would be a way to find out why or how the person got into the cave and stuff like that. thats alot of potion lol. But i still have the question about snapes curse though.


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  #14  
Old December 3rd, 2005, 10:50 pm
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Re: Theories about the Lake in Voldemort's Cave

I must say that this is a very good, well constructed theory. Very good thinking here. I can find very few flaws in it. There is only one thing I question-if Dumbledore was simply under the influence of the draught of living death and Snape did not actually kill him, then why did his portrait appear in the headmaster's office? I have always assumed that those portraits are of the deceased former headmasters. But perhaps they appear when the person stops being the headmaster How would whatever magic makes the portraits appear know that Dumbledore was not just asleep...can the draught of living death be so decieving? That's what I wonder...

GoGryffindor31: actually, when I read the theory I also immediately thought of Veritaserum. I really, truly did! Odd coincedence, that. And that is a good point about the draught of living death being pink...Slughorn certainly praised it enough, which makes me think that pale pink is the correct color.


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  #15  
Old December 3rd, 2005, 11:05 pm
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Re: Theories about the Lake in Voldemort's Cave

A few things:
  1. There's no protection against the killing curse. Perhaps Snape used a non-verbal spell, but there hasn't been any indication that two spells could be casted at the same time, with the choice of one effect of a spell coming out. That seems a bit too deus-ex-machina.

  2. Magic can be tricked, but only because the people who interpret it are falliable. The Portrait in Dumbledore's office clearly indicates he's dead. Unless it's for "former" headmasters (meaning you could have worked there and still be alive and still have a portrait), I fail to see any reason why a portrait would appear due to a what is essentially a sleeping potion. It's only "death-like" in name only, not by effect. Besides Dumbledore just died...I imagine having a portrait formed needed some time to adjust and rest before being all spry and happy.

  3. Although magic could be fooled, I doubt that sleep equates death in the magical world. Thus if the unbreakable vow was to kill Dumbledore...then Snape would probably die if Dumbledore was merely sleeping. If the unbreakable vow was to make Dumbledore useless, and get him out of the way...then I would imagine it would be correct.


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Old December 3rd, 2005, 11:12 pm
Cryoz  Undisclosed.gif Cryoz is offline
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Re: Theories about the Lake in Voldemort's Cave

I also thought about the Veritaserum as a possibility, but I think that its practical purpose in Slughorn's lesson was to distract us, and make us think there isn't another potion that looks like water. Besides, the after-effects of this potion would not be as exhausting as the Draught of Living Death's (assuming that they were not caused by the green potion, but we're beyond that I think.)
Concerning the portraits, nowhere does it say that the headmaster should die in order to have a portrait, and nowhere does it say he shouldn't. There's not much to argue about here, and nothing that contradicts my theory.
Whether the "clear as water" refers to the color or translucence? No one can tell for sure, but I think it refers to the color, because if it was clear pink it would be probably mentioned. It says clear as water, and not just "clear", which is more specific.


  #17  
Old December 3rd, 2005, 11:16 pm
PorridgeBoy  Undisclosed.gif PorridgeBoy is offline
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Re: Theories about the Lake in Voldemort's Cave

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cryoz
Concerning the portraits, nowhere does it say that the headmaster should die in order to have a portrait, and nowhere does it say he shouldn't. There's not much to argue about here, and nothing that contradicts my theory.
If that is the case, why is it that a portrait did appear in CoS if Dumbledore was no longer a headmaster? I imagine even for that short while, a portrait would appear even for the breifest moment during his absense. Even when he left Hogwarts and Umbridge was in charge, there seemed to be no protrait at the time.

And point #3 still stands.

I should mention I'm not debating whether or not the water in the cave is Draught of living death. Just that Dumbledore is dead..I hope I'm not bringing ill will into this thread.



Last edited by PorridgeBoy; December 3rd, 2005 at 11:48 pm.
  #18  
Old December 3rd, 2005, 11:26 pm
Cryoz  Undisclosed.gif Cryoz is offline
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Re: Theories about the Lake in Voldemort's Cave

Quote:
Originally Posted by PorridgeBoy
If that is the case, why is it that a portrait did appear in CoS if Dumbledore was no longer a headmaster? I imagine even for that short while, a portrait would appear even for the breifest moment during his absense. Even when he left Hogwarts and Umbridge was in charge, there seemed to be no protrait at the time.

And point #3 still stands.
The mechanism to the appearance of the portraits is unclear. However, it is possible that it was set up by Dumbledore and that he knew he was going to feign his death in some way that night. It is very likely, because it should look like Snape fulfilled his vow, and killed Dumbledore (without mentioning the careful wording of "should it prove necessary" that Voldemort probably isn't aware of).

Concerning point #3, as I said before, notice Rowling's careful wording of Narcissa's vow conditions - "And should it prove necessary". It might have been unnecessary to kill Dumbledore.

And don't worry, PorridgeBoy, your ponderings are totally understandable.



Last edited by Cryoz; December 3rd, 2005 at 11:31 pm.
  #19  
Old December 4th, 2005, 2:19 am
bravesfan150  Male.gif bravesfan150 is offline
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Re: Theories about the Lake in Voldemort's Cave

that was a great article that you wrote, it seems very possible to me that dumbledore is alive now.

but how could mugglenet not accept that editorial, it was more practicle than some i have read(nifflers helping find horcruxes), and made more sense than others(magical echoes)


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"What's comin' will come, an' we'll meet it when it does." - Hagrid

"Well, I had one that I was playing Quidditch the other night," said Ron, screwing up his face in an effort to remember. "What do you think that means?"
"Probably that you're going to be eaten by a giant marshmallow or something," said Harry, turning the pages of The Dream Oracle without interest.
  #20  
Old December 4th, 2005, 7:08 am
HPbecky  Undisclosed.gif HPbecky is offline
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Re: Theories about the Lake in Voldemort's Cave

This theory is genius, pure genius...


 
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